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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-17-2012 09:18 PM
Dave M
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

He's in college for biology, so he can study fisheries management. As much as I'm busting his balls, out of everyone on this forum aside from someone like ewert.... He's the only one with cred when it comes to the topic of fisheries management.
02-17-2012 09:56 AM
fistfullafish
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brookieflyfisher1
One lake that hasn't benefited from the introduction of the ZM? I have a pretty big one, it's called Lake Michigan. Erie is the only lake where there was any kind of positive effect from zebra mussels. The other lakes, especially Lake Michigan, are suffering, especially the perch fisheries.

It's sad to listen to the bait shop owners out here talk about how much better the fishing used to be before the ZM started spreading.

Zebra mussles change the ecosystem from pelagic- and macrophyte-based food webs to benthic based food webs dominated by zebra mussels and their only predator: the freshwater drum. In other words unless the lake is polluted beyond all get out, then the zebra mussel will have large, irreversible, and incredibly negative effects. There is no lake in Colorado that could possibly benefit from a zebra mussel introduction, and that is a fact.

Bighead carp and snakeheads aren't much to worry about out here. Snakeheads are so stupidly aggressive that it would be easy to fish them out, plus they don't compete as well with northerns and bass as was once thought. The bighead carp require backwaters and flooded waterways in order to proliferate, and they don't have that here. If you must know, bighead and silver carp have been present in Colorado for some years now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brookieflyfisher1
The fishing still appears to remain good because of intensive management and short memories. The simple fact of the matter is the Great Lakes are huge and we haven't yet reached the tipping point (look up "alternate stable states" or "hysteresis") to where the ecosystem situation becomes truly terrible. People also forget about how good it used to be. It's still good compared to 90% of the US, but it's a shadow of what it was just 10 years ago. Sure, smallies have benefited but that's because, like I said, the food chain is already beginning to shift from a pelagic to a benthic-based ecosystem. They'll continue to thrive until the shift has gone too far.

Record salmon and steelhead? You weren't here last year, when only a few hundred steelhead came through the South Bend fish ladder (for comparison, we usually get about 5,000). Salmon and steelies aren't good indicators of ecosystem health because they're more subject to stocking and freak events (whole year classes can be lost in the river of origin if there's an early warm spell).

If ZM or other invasives were to enter CO waterways, it would be like the great lakes just on a hyper-accelerated time-scale. In the case of ZM, due to the fact that they cause a large amount of damage, it could would likely become so bad that the army corps and BOR will make the decision that it isn't worth the cost to maintain the dam, and they'll drain the lake. Nobody wants that.
Do you work for an ANS inspection company or training program?
02-17-2012 09:48 AM
slimer
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheUkrainian
Are seat belts really that important?
For kids, yes. But once you reach legal age I feel it's your choice.
02-17-2012 09:24 AM
TheUkrainian
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

Are seat belts really that important?
02-16-2012 09:30 PM
Dave M
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brookieflyfisher1


If ZM or other invasives were to enter CO waterways, it would be like the great lakes just on a hyper-accelerated time-scale. In the case of ZM, due to the fact that they cause a large amount of damage, it could would likely become so bad that the army corps and BOR will make the decision that it isn't worth the cost to maintain the dam, and they'll drain the lake. Nobody wants that.
alot of OK's lakes are ACE ran and maintained, and they have zebra mussels... and they are still full, brookie.
02-16-2012 04:47 AM
brookieflyfisher1
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

The fishing still appears to remain good because of intensive management and short memories. The simple fact of the matter is the Great Lakes are huge and we haven't yet reached the tipping point (look up "alternate stable states" or "hysteresis") to where the ecosystem situation becomes truly terrible. People also forget about how good it used to be. It's still good compared to 90% of the US, but it's a shadow of what it was just 10 years ago. Sure, smallies have benefited but that's because, like I said, the food chain is already beginning to shift from a pelagic to a benthic-based ecosystem. They'll continue to thrive until the shift has gone too far.

Record salmon and steelhead? You weren't here last year, when only a few hundred steelhead came through the South Bend fish ladder (for comparison, we usually get about 5,000). Salmon and steelies aren't good indicators of ecosystem health because they're more subject to stocking and freak events (whole year classes can be lost in the river of origin if there's an early warm spell).

If ZM or other invasives were to enter CO waterways, it would be like the great lakes just on a hyper-accelerated time-scale. In the case of ZM, due to the fact that they cause a large amount of damage, it could would likely become so bad that the army corps and BOR will make the decision that it isn't worth the cost to maintain the dam, and they'll drain the lake. Nobody wants that.
02-15-2012 07:44 PM
mogul buster
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

I've spent time fishing Lake Michigan near Arcadia, MI recently...locals seem to be loving record salmon/trout runs...6+ lb smallies...quality walleyes...and the whitefish are doing well (especially smoked). All this and they don't have to wait in line to launch and can do so anytime as long as there's no ice. Sounds like a good trade....
02-15-2012 04:04 PM
slimer
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

From wiki:

Quote:
However, zebra mussels and other non-native species are credited with the increased population and size of smallmouth bass in Lake Erie[27] and yellow perch in Lake St. Clair.[28] They cleanse the waters of inland lakes, resulting in increased sunlight penetration and growth of native algae at greater depths. This cleansing also increases water visibility and filters out pollutants. Each quagga and zebra mussel filters about 1 US quart (0.95 l) of water a day when confined to small tanks.[29] In lakes, their filtering effects are usually spatially restricted (near the lake bottom) due to non-homogeneous water column mixing.

Doesn't sound too bad to me
02-15-2012 01:44 PM
walleye seeker
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

that is true that the eastern waters are fishing better but it wont last. the deeper the water will show no decrese in fishing for several years but sooner or later there will be no food for the minows and as they die off so will the bigger fish
02-15-2012 01:14 PM
Dave M
Re: Are Zebra Mussel Inspections Really That Important?

Quote:
Originally Posted by UNREPENTANT SINNER
Can't say about any others but the people I talked to on eastern L Ontario and the St. Lawrence said the fishing had rebounded and the water cleared and had no I'll effects to blame on the ZM.
There is a thriving fishing industry there.
The SM fishing was great.
your friends are liars that do not fish.
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