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Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow anglers,

I now finally have the weekends free and I want to look into 2-3 day hiking routes with great fly fishing along the way.

Any recommendations? I live in Denver and I'm more than willing to drive 3-4 hours.

Thanks
 

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When the high lakes open up you can really get busy with adventures like this. Until then, you will need to get creative and do your homework with finding somewhere to do this on creeks or rivers, as a lot of them have private stretches mixed in where you can't walk, and camping can be restricted to designated sites only even on public land.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When the high lakes open up you can really get busy with adventures like this. Until then, you will need to get creative and do your homework with finding somewhere to do this on creeks or rivers, as a lot of them have private stretches mixed in where you can't walk, and camping can be restricted to designated sites only even on public land.
Thanks for the reply, I've heard good things about different high lake hikes - as you can tell I'm eager to get out there.

Do you think Mt. Evans or Vasquez Peak would be a better place to get creative?
 

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Probably not open yet, but I would think you could spend as much time as you want in Rocky Mountain National park and fish to your heart's content without worrying about private property.
 

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It'll be some time before those high alpine lakes thaw to the point that they're fishable...
 

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Pick up a Colorado atlas & gazetteer. It shows many of the hiking trails as well as roads. Find the ones that lead to the blue spots. Then use your Google Fu to find the answers which you seek grasshopper. Get the topos for the areas you plan on hiking in. Should be enough time to find a summers worth of options in the 2-3 day range within 3-4 hours of Denver before the high country opens up.
 

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Pick up a Colorado atlas & gazetteer. It shows many of the hiking trails as well as roads. Find the ones that lead to the blue spots. Then use your Google Fu to find the answers which you seek grasshopper. Get the topos for the areas you plan on hiking in. Should be enough time to find a summers worth of options in the 2-3 day range within 3-4 hours of Denver before the high country opens up.
This. People don't talk about their high country spots much, you have to find your own! :-X
 

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If you have a couple of days, my suggestion would be to choose a good lake, hike in and spend a couple of days there. Oftentimes the feeding windows can be short..a lake that appeared dead can turn on and you'd never know it if you only spent a few hours fishing.
 

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Thanks for the reply, I've heard good things about different high lake hikes - as you can tell I'm eager to get out there.

Do you think Mt. Evans or Vasquez Peak would be a better place to get creative?
I'd look for low elevation creeks and forks of creeks through public lands.
 

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Its not usually until Early / mid July that high lakes are accessible in most cases. The continental Divide holds hundreds of lakes, plenty of hikes to keep you exploring and finding the good ones :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
THANK YOU


I'm impressed and very grateful! I didn't think I'd get this kind of response, much appreciated. I'll check out the Rocky Mountain National Park, no need to worry about private property.

And Bugz, I must say, you make it sound so complicated.. :clap2::loco:

Thanks for the recommendations, I'll report back.

Bolen
 

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I'm impressed and very grateful! I didn't think I'd get this kind of response, much appreciated. I'll check out the Rocky Mountain National Park, no need to worry about private property.

And Bugz, I must say, you make it sound so complicated.. :clap2::loco:

Thanks for the recommendations, I'll report back.

Bolen
The cool part about this state is that you could explore all the little high mountain lakes, streams, etc for the rest of your life and never run out of stuff to do
 

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And Bugz, I must say, you make it sound so complicated.. :clap2::loco:
Bolen
If looking at maps is too complicated you really should not go into the mountains without a chaperon...:der:
 

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Pick up a Colorado atlas & gazetteer. It shows many of the hiking trails as well as roads. Find the ones that lead to the blue spots. Then use your Google Fu to find the answers which you seek grasshopper. Get the topos for the areas you plan on hiking in. Should be enough time to find a summers worth of options in the 2-3 day range within 3-4 hours of Denver before the high country opens up.
That's too complicated? :-\

The Gazeteer is a magazine format, helps give you an overview of the entire region. You just flip the pages until something catches your interest. Then you get the topo maps (REI, Federal Center, Army Surplus store, etc .)which gives you close up details of what you will be going through. That's all you need right there but you do need to be able to use a compass. If you don't know how to use a compass then you should go with someone who does and can show you, or take a course at REI.
 

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If you're really interested in high lakes and the alpine experience, other than the Never Summer Wilderness..I'd skip Rocky Mountain National Park. It's a great place to take your wife or girlfriend for a hike or a picnic. But, so many better places to go.

With the internet now, you really don't need a Gazeteer or any other maps..you have everything you need right online...including google earth. I don't own a gps ...I own several compasses but haven't used them since I was in the boy scouts. You'll find that every lake with a name has a trail leading up to it. It's pretty hard to get lost.

Just for starters, there are great lakes on both sides of the Sangres, the Collegiate Peaks, the San juans, Holy Cross..even the Indian Peaks and James Peak areas close by...Rocky Mountain Park is beautiful..but of just the few areas mentioned...it would be my last choice to fish.
 

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If you're really interested in high lakes and the alpine experience, other than the Never Summer Wilderness..I'd skip Rocky Mountain National Park. It's a great place to take your wife or girlfriend for a hike or a picnic. But, so many better places to go.

With the internet now, you really don't need a Gazeteer or any other maps..you have everything you need right online...including google earth. I don't own a gps ...I own several compasses but haven't used them since I was in the boy scouts. You'll find that every lake with a name has a trail leading up to it. It's pretty hard to get lost.

Just for starters, there are great lakes on both sides of the Sangres, the Collegiate Peaks, the San juans, Holy Cross..even the Indian Peaks and James Peak areas close by...Rocky Mountain Park is beautiful..but of just the few areas mentioned...it would be my last choice to fish.
CHURCH! (although I do use topo maps to find flatter areas to camp in.)

RMNP is especially unappealing with the entry fees, camping permits and mandatory camping sites.

FYI, always call the local ranger district of an area you are looking to overnight in. They can give you snow pack reports and permit info.
 

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If you're really interested in high lakes and the alpine experience, other than the Never Summer Wilderness..I'd skip Rocky Mountain National Park. It's a great place to take your wife or girlfriend for a hike or a picnic. But, so many better places to go.

With the internet now, you really don't need a Gazeteer or any other maps..you have everything you need right online...including google earth. I don't own a gps ...I own several compasses but haven't used them since I was in the boy scouts. You'll find that every lake with a name has a trail leading up to it. It's pretty hard to get lost.

Just for starters, there are great lakes on both sides of the Sangres, the Collegiate Peaks, the San juans, Holy Cross..even the Indian Peaks and James Peak areas close by...Rocky Mountain Park is beautiful..but of just the few areas mentioned...it would be my last choice to fish.
I agree about RMNP.

But I do think it's easy to get lost. Real easy. GPS is a great toy but you can run out of juice. Knowing how to use a map and compass is basic, IMO. Just like dressing in layers, having raingear with you, etc.
 
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