Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A fellow CF member suggested that my posts were too loud. Soooo, in an attempt to be “quieter,” I will post a picture my smallest fish this year:


The picture doesn’t do it justice. This was one of the prettiest white bass I have ever seen. Perfect fins. Intact, glimmering scales. I even got to thinking: is this the version of “baby skin” for fish? Anyhoo, little fish are cool too. I think all of my prettiest fish were little.

My prettiest walleye:


But, alas, maybe showing pretty fish is being too loud too? Maybe I ought to show ugly, little fish:


That won’t do either. That’s just the other extreme, and extremes are loud by definition. I guess I don’t know how to be quiet. What should I do? This is an intellectual impasse! Am I condemned to roam the surface of the earth as a wretched loudmouth until I expire? If this is my destiny on earth, then truly dread the ominous fate that awaits me in the hell of loudmouths! What will I do, I who am a loudmouth sinner, when the trumpet of the Lord shall sound! :D

OK, so, yeah, let's see your small, or ugly, or pretty, or whatever fish. :biggrin1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,702 Posts
A.O I'll respectfully share my opinion that I think your posts are just fine the way they are.

But you asked for pretty fish, regardless of size, so here's a couple from a few years back when I had to work in the Midwest.

Wisconsin Brown Trout from a crystal clear spring fed stream in Southwest Wisconsin, an area known as The Driftless.





North Central Michigan stream. A swampy area surrounded by white pines in the National Forest. The most beautiful Brook Trout I have ever caught.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Nice! Brookies are some of the prettiest fish out here. Brown trout, or fario as they call it in certain parts of Europe, are nice too. It's just hard to capture all of the color hues in those fish. For me anyway. I don't have the fancy camera for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #15





Bonus Golden trout.
You saved the best for last. Browns from my childhood looked more like this:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://img.xooimage.com/files96/0/0/8/02--3e44a85.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.natureetpassions.com/t2268-Truite-fario-ou.htm&h=450&w=800&tbnid=yrRtdhEdEw6k0M:&zoom=1&docid=HTQkqmUsesMncM&ei=IFF4VYGFB4bKogTfvoCwCQ&tbm=isch&ved=0CAgQMygEMAQ4rAJqFQoTCIGVgZ-yhcYCFQaliAodXx8Alg
or this:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://lesamisdelatruite.com/wpimages/wp394390c3_05_06.jpg&imgrefurl=http://lesamisdelatruite.com/identification.html&h=166&w=342&tbnid=FtROrJ1apZBhsM:&zoom=1&docid=b9usxWGrNDaXgM&ei=JVB4VaDNC9GvogSV3oJY&tbm=isch&ved=0CGQQMyhgMGA4ZGoVChMI4POtp7GFxgIV0ZeICh0VrwAL
It turns out there are a lot of strands:
http://lesamisdelatruite.com/repertoire.html

The brown trout has a special place in European lore and lexicon. Something I wrote on here a while back:

Bummer :mad:. I swear, it wasn’t me. Based on what little I know about Latin, it should be “truttam” for the accusative case. As a reference, check the inflection for dies/diem:
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dies
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/trutta
It’s the same difference between “he” (nominative) and “him” (accusative) in English.

BTW, trout have a special place in the Indo-European lexicon (the family of languages that includes most European languages, Persian in the Middle East and Hindi in Asia). The root for the word “fish” in Proto-Indo-European means “paint or mark.” It is believed to refer to trout as the prototypical fish due to the markings on the trout, i.e. the ubiquitous trout in Eurasia came to mean “fish” in general. The root for the word salmon can also be traced back to Proto-Indo-European. Therefore, linguists have argued that the homeland of the Proto-Indo-Europeans must be in an area with trout/salmon. However, due to the semantic shifts that likely occurred during the Indo-European diaspora, linguists are not sure whether “trout/salmon” refers to the Atlantic salmon (salmo salar) or the brown trout (salmo trutta). Based on the first interpretation, the homeland may have been near the Baltic Sea (for salmon). The second interpretation would place the homeland near the Black Sea. So, there you go, if you didn’t already know, “carpe trutta” is the perfect address for discussion about fish (not just trout) related topics because the trout is the prototypical fish in Indo-European languages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,616 Posts
A pretty brown:



A pretty 'Bow:


A pretty Brook:


A pretty Cutty:


Another pretty Cutty:


Another pretty Brown:


Another pretty Brookie:


Prolly my Prettiest Cutty:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
A pretty brown:



A pretty 'Bow:


A pretty Brook:


A pretty Cutty:


Another pretty Cutty:


Another pretty Brown:


Another pretty Brookie:


Prolly my Prettiest Cutty:
I can't see pics
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
One of the greatest misnomers in trout fishing is the use of the term "German Brown." Unless you're fishing in Germany, the chances of the fish having the genetics of a German Brown are small. Most brown trout in the USA are mutts with a mixture of genetics from German, Scottish, English and Irish fish. Lewis Lake in Yellowstone has a fairly pure strain of Loch Leven Browns from Scotland and, if I recall correctly, they lack any red spotting. Rainbow trout have a similar hodgepodge of genetics in the USA.

Here's an interesting article about Brown Trout in the USA- http://thefrogwater.com/2013/06/01/brown-trout-subspecies-in-the-u-s/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Are u color blind?
Well, um, no, but even if I were, I would still be able to see pics. I do see RED X marks where the pics should be. :biggrin1:
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top