Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well. I'm bidding a fond farewell to Colorado, home for the last 50+ years, going back to my roots. It brings a bittersweet memory to leave such a beautiful state, a state that I'll always call home. But the cold and the long winters are getting to my old bones. The thought of sucking an umbrella drink sitting by a pool in my swimming suit versus hot toddies by the fireplace in my sweater - to me, that's a no-brainer. Don't get me wrong. Eating a freshly caught 7 inch brookie in a high mountain meadow or downing a perch, walleye, a red meated trout in corn meal or whatever concoction you prefer is great in it's own right. But eating salt water fish or a freshly shucked oyster or catching a mess of blue crabs (or stone crabs) or drooling over your own lobster caught an hour earlier sure beats anything that the fresh water can produce in my humble opinion. Sure, there are major drawbacks. Bugs, fire ants, hurricanes (that's what insurance was invented for), tornados (ditto), more PEOPLE than you can shake a stick at, falling iguanas, alligators, snakes, etc, etc. But going back to your roots brings an ethereal feeling to your soul. The sounds of the waves breaking on the Gulf beach and seagulls screaming overhead waiting to catch a thrown entrail, smelling a hibiscus or jasmine bloom or passing an orange grove when the trees are blossoming when the snow is falling back in Colorado, all make a Louisiana/Florida boy happy.

Colorado - pretty as a picture. The pines, the aspen, the mountains, the scenery that cannot be equaled, quiet fly fishing whether it be in a tiny pool or a rushing river, I sure will miss ya. But my roots are calling me back to my true home, the ocean. A place I can call my final resting place. To the many friendships I have forged throughout my years, farewell and goodbye...

Plus there will always be a place poolside with an extra Mimosa or Tequila Sunrise or Pina Colada or Daiquiri or Mai Tai calling our names... Or an ice cold Modelo or Corona (no jokes plz) with a lime slice if you prefer...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Hurricanes....enough to convince me I like it just fine here in Western Colorado. I wouldn't call it an opportunity but I had the experience of talking with and listening to one of our Squadron Commanders who was hunkered down in his house when Hurricane Andrew thundered overhead. Not enough insurance in the world would make me want to go through that. He got all his planes and folks out of Homestead Air Base but stayed behind to marshal help when the worst was past. Still, I have good friends that live in Florida up in Melborne and I worry for them every hurricane season. Good luck with your upcoming move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
True about the hurricanes. You just have to prepare in the off season for hurricane season. And buy the correct home with enough elevation to stave off high water which comes mainly from rain water and ill established drainage systems in most hurricanes. The same way you buy a house in Colorado doing your homework about winter, radon, fires, etc. You do your best homework and live with the results. Hurricane season is approx 5 months long and at 8600' elevation in Colorado (where we have lived for several years), winter can last about 7-8 months when we can and do get snow and at or near below 0 degree temps. However, since our skiing days are over and our winding down years are approaching, we've decided that since fishing season is 12 months a year in Florida and swimming season lasts 9 months a year plus an average high temperature is 75 degrees and a low temp is 57 degrees where we're moving vs our current average high 57 degrees and 22 degree lows makes sense for us. We're just ready for the change and we'll deal with the weather as we reacclimatise to the heat and humidity...
We'll miss the clear blue skies and starry nites though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
True about the hurricanes. You just have to prepare in the off season for hurricane season. And buy the correct home with enough elevation to stave off high water which comes mainly from rain water and ill established drainage systems in most hurricanes. The same way you buy a house in Colorado doing your homework about winter, radon, fires, etc. You do your best homework and live with the results. Hurricane season is approx 5 months long and at 8600' elevation in Colorado (where we have lived for several years), winter can last about 7-8 months when we can and do get snow and at or near below 0 degree temps. However, since our skiing days are over and our winding down years are approaching, we've decided that since fishing season is 12 months a year in Florida and swimming season lasts 9 months a year plus an average high temperature is 75 degrees and a low temp is 57 degrees where we're moving vs our current average high 57 degrees and 22 degree lows makes sense for us. We're just ready for the change and we'll deal with the weather as we reacclimatise to the heat and humidity...
We'll miss the clear blue skies and starry nites though...
Again, good luck with the move. One thing I have to laugh about was while I lived up in Oregon we went through about 10 months of rain. (September to June it seemed) I never knew there were so many types of rain (at least in the typical Oregonian jargon). What surprised me is I spent quite a bit of time down at Homestead AB and then Patrick AFB up in Melbourne and it seemed like it rained harder there than it ever did in Oregon. It was in Oregon however that I learned that rainy season was a great time to fish. Also learned that if you were going to fish the rivers you would wade in up to your knees. If you couldn't see your feet you might as well go home as the water was too murky. I guess that isn't a problem in Florida - My experience fishing in Florida consists of fishing the Banana River that runs between the mainland and the island where Cocoa Beach and Melbourne are located. That was actually pretty good fishing now that I think about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,786 Posts
My roots are Mass. You couldn't pay me enough to go back there. I agree the cold Colorado winters are getting harder as I get older but not enough to leave. Everything else is good here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I remember fishing the Nisqually and the Snohomish rivers and Lake Quinault in Washington State fishing with my Grandpa Jack back in the 50s where I learned to love trout fishing. He also taught me how to fish for sea run browns and the occasional flounder near the Narrows Bridge with nightcrawlers we caught the week before in his yard then semi buried them in a pine box out in his yard. I remember digging the gooeyduck clams from the beaches of Washington and the bowls of fresh clam chowder afterwards. Thank you Grandpa Jack for taking the time to take this kid under your wing and giving him a lifelong passion from which he never recovered.
I remember fishing with Grandpa Jack and my mom and dad casting old level wind reels into the Gulf of Mexico on Indian Rocks Beach in the 50s and 60s and catching breakfast and dinner from the shoreline. I remember fishing at lunchtime during school in the bay of my elementary school's backyard in Indian Shores, Florida. Imagine that - fishing during lunch at school. Bet they don't do that anymore. Too dangerous... Dangerous is kicking a catfish off of a pier with tennis shoes on and stabbing your big toe with one of his fins. Then having the thrashing fish with his fin still in your big toe while your father clipped off the barb with his knife or whatever, going to the emergency room to get the barb removed and having your big toe grow to such a prodigious size that you could not wear shoes for the next couple of months and hobbling around in flip flops having a toe the size of a lemon. Ah, the joys of youth and growing up fishing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
When it snows 5 inches on June 9th and we get wind chills in the low 20s, it again reminds me of why we decided to move back to FLA and swelter in 90 degree temps with 80% humidity and the cool ocean water. Heat and humidity for 4 months sure beat snow and cold temps for 7-8 months of the year. However, both would be nice too...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
When it snows 5 inches on June 9th and we get wind chills in the low 20s, it again reminds me of why we decided to move back to FLA and swelter in 90 degree temps with 80% humidity and the cool ocean water. Heat and humidity for 4 months sure beat snow and cold temps for 7-8 months of the year. However, both would be nice too...
I "relocated" to FL in 2015 but kept my cabin in Florissant CO and return 6 to 8 time per year - best of both worlds. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Humidity is good. No more cracked and bleeding fingers, lips, chapped hands, can't feel my fingers or toes or nose, nose bleeds, dry skin, can't hold on to anything 'cause it slips out of my dry fingers, etc. Hello swollen fingers, drenched clothes, bathing suits in October, flip flops, swimming through the air in June-July-August, traffic, salt water and rust, etc. Damn that traffic...
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top