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Sounds like bad flouro. Flouro can kink up really badly, but I've never had it come off the spool like that. Did you give it a good pull to see if it would straighten out?
 

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Discussion Starter #62
I used to use the rubber pieces to straighten my line out. Heat and friction cause problems over time and I was having leader failure towards the end of the season. I don't change out leaders often. A good pull should straighten the line out, even with flouro, if it doesn't, I'd get rid of it.
 

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slowdown said:
TH said:
I tried doing a search for this- no luck, so I'll ask here:

I fished with flouro tippet for the first time this weekend and I was miserable. Everytime it came off the spool it curly-qued up like gift wrapping. Threading #20-22 flies was no fun.

Is this just a bad roll of tippet or is this common with flouro? Thanks.
You were pulling from the wrong tag end.
Thanks, slow. Makes sense.
 

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ptaft said:
Let me clarify. Of course you can catch as many fish with a 20$ rod, heck I could catch fish with a piece of pvc and a wad of yarn, that's not the point I was trying to make. Any analogy will fit here, sure you can drive down the road in a bug but wouldn't you rather be driving a Lambo? And any bow will kill an elk but I gurantee my Bowtech is a hell of a lot more fun to shoot than my old PSE 15 years ago. My point is sure a TFO will catch fish but I enjoy the feel of some high end rods and granted not all high enders are on the same level, case in point Oyeys z-axis. It's all personal preference, and by the way I have casted virtually all types and price ranges of rods and while some low enders do cast well I can certainly tell the difference, and anyone that has fly casted for any decent amount of time should be able to tell. Use whatever you can afford or enjoy, I could care less, my comment was to Koldcut as I assumed he haden't had the opportunity to cast a high end rod, and like the Lambo analogy I think people should take advantage of experiencing nicer things if they get a chance, that's it. Or don't and everyone stick with the bug. ::)
I think the other big difference with most more expensive rods is the warranty. I have an Albright rod that is wonderful, but only a 1 year warranty. It cost 60% less than a higher end rod I have. The higher end rod is better, but the Albright is in the ball park. BUT the higher end rod has a life time warranty. I buy higher end rods because I know its a matter of when I am going to damage my rod not if.
 

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Re straightening leaders or tippet, I read in an A.K. Best book a tip to just put the line across the heel of your hand with all four finger tips pressed on the line and pull your hand down while holding the upper end stationary with your other hand, and it straightens well without generating too much heat/friction. You can feel any heat that generates and control it, plus the idea is that you'll slow down to keep the heat tolerable. Anyway, I tossed the leather leader straightener after reading that and have done the A.K. think ever since and it seems to work well.

But also, be sure to pull the outer end of the tippet off the spool and not the inner end . . .

For what it's worth.
 

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I am a newbie to the ColoradoFisherman forums, but have been a Colorado fly fishing guide for years.

I think that you can only be as good as your equipment! I also think the best way to learn how to fly fish, especially in Colorado is to hire a guide. I am NOT saying that just because it is my main source of income, but because bad habits are hard to break. The right guide will show you the ropes and have you let it fly, until he or she sees you making a mistake, then they will correct you.

Back to the topic -
I like bamboo! I only fish bamboo and so do my guests. I use good fly line (I actually use 3M sharkskin on all my reels) I do not buy leaders, I taper my own with tippet. I use Wright and Mcgill waders because of the warranty, and because they are located in Denver (oh and because the sponsor me ;) ) I use korkers boots because I do a lot of hiking and you can swap the soles easily. I like a good lanyard full of toys, and a simms G4 guide vest. I would recommend buying a seine to find what bugs are in the water. Weights (I use egg and have for years) Indicators - I love the new thingamabobbers. Hair indicators are also great.


What you need to know -
A great guide! But if not learn these things: 3 knots - nail knot, surgeons knot, and improved clinch. What flies are hatching, and what bugs are in the water column (seine comes in handy). Where to put your fly (top water, sub-surface, dredge)

This sounds like a lot? Then go with a guide the first few times! Get all the gear you need and make sure fly fishing is for you before shelling out $1000 bucks on stuff you may only use twice!

That is my 2 cents...
 

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coloradoflyguide said:
...and no this is not SPAM.
coloradoflyguide said:
I am a newbie to the ColoradoFisherman forums, but have been a Colorado fly fishing guide for years.

I think that you can only be as good as your equipment! I also think the best way to learn how to fly fish, especially in Colorado is to hire a guide. I am NOT saying that just because it is my main source of income, but because bad habits are hard to break. The right guide will show you the ropes and have you let it fly, until he or she sees you making a mistake, then they will correct you.

Back to the topic -
I like bamboo! I only fish bamboo and so do my guests. I use good fly line (I actually use 3M sharkskin on all my reels) I do not buy leaders, I taper my own with tippet. I use Wright and Mcgill waders because of the warranty, and because they are located in Denver (oh and because the sponsor me ;) ) I use korkers boots because I do a lot of hiking and you can swap the soles easily. I like a good lanyard full of toys, and a simms G4 guide vest. I would recommend buying a seine to find what bugs are in the water. Weights (I use egg and have for years) Indicators - I love the new thingamabobbers. Hair indicators are also great.


What you need to know -
A great guide! But if not learn these things: 3 knots - nail knot, surgeons knot, and improved clinch. What flies are hatching, and what bugs are in the water column (seine comes in handy). Where to put your fly (top water, sub-surface, dredge)

This sounds like a lot? Then go with a guide the first few times! Get all the gear you need and make sure fly fishing is for you before shelling out $1000 bucks on stuff you may only use twice!

That is my 2 cents...
 

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I'm a newbie who's starting to get a handle on things (or so I think). What about Streamers? Any info for newbies about fishing them? Techniques? Any special tricks?

Thanks!

Tom
 

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I often say that there are as many ways to fish them as there are patterns.

In my experience one of the most important factors is depth. Like Slow said, make them dance !! The larger a fish gets the more they will take the opportunity to feed on smaller fish, you may not have the 50 fish days but you can find great satisfaction in catching fewer yet larger fish.

Think like a fish. This is a huge key to success, know when and where the fish are and why they are there.

I fish a 6wt most days, it allows to to nymph or strip whatever the fish want. I also carry an 8wt with me, we get some really wicked winds in the canyons and when the guys with the 3-4wts are packing it in I am still blasting away, I love the wind, bring it on.
 

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Hey, Geek. Have taken your advice re Albright stuff, i.e., A-5 rod, Bugato reel, Trinity waders, and so far, am very happy with all of it, plus, like you, I'm averse to spending a lot of dough on this stuff if I don't have to. You mentioned earlier in this thread about $7 a spool fly line (??). Was that a typo, or do you actually find decent fly line that way? Can't see how you'd get "weight forward" or "double taper" that way. Thanks for any further insights.
 

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No it was not a typo and it was Orvis WFF fly line, unfortunately they have begun running out of it and the only have 4wt and 7wt lines left. I hope your Albright gear serves you well for many years, I don't think I have ever heard a bad thing about the A-5 rods, I love the Bugati reels I have and while I have had to make some repairs to my waders, for $30 I have been well served.

DUBBN told me he picked up a $7 fly line and he is really liking it for more than one reason.
 

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FFG - Many thanks for the reply and add'l advice. Re breathable wader repair, just saw a short article on that a few days ago involving spraying isopropyl alcohol to identify pinhole leaks on the inside which I'm interested to try on some old waders to see if I can salvage them to use as backup waders or for float tubing. Knute
 

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I just skimmed this whole thread and may have missed this but I think that it is one of the most important aspects of learning how to fish. That is learning how to think about fishing, or as some people say to think like a fish.

All fish are very basic and dumb creatures with a set of insticts that can make them difficult to catch. However, if you understand the insticts you can often manage to hang a few fish even in difficult situations. The entire existance of fish is to stay alive so they can reproduce, all their insticts are geared to achieve this.

1. The most helpful instinct to understand is the goal of a positive calorie balance- ie fish need to eat more calories than it takes them to live.
This affects several things. First, fish will seek sections of water (especially in rivers) where they can move as little as possible but still have access to good amounts of food. This is why fish often sit by rocks or on the slow edge of a seam. This also means that a fish will move more for high calorie food vs low cal foods which affects fly selection and presentation (and also provides basis for crashing a hatch). Much more could be said on this but just learn to ask yourself if your fly/presentation is such that fish can achieve this (remember at times consistent small meals can be easier than one large one)

2. While optimizing #1 fish must stay alive by not being eaten. This drives them to find places that have food require little energy to stay in and provides protection. This is why people often look for structure when fishing. This is also why you will often find tons of fish in optimal feeding lanes in shallow areas, but only when a nice big pool or other place of escape is near by. This is also why changes in color of the river bottom ar so crucial (fish the areas where it is harder to see the fish). This is also why fly selection/presentation have to be perfect at times.

3. Fish, like all animals, lose their minds when it comes to mating. They will at times attack things much larger and at others not eat at all. If you can identify fish that are in this mode you can safe yourself a good amount of time by not fishing to them- especially since it reduces future generations of said fish.

4. Think of fish senses. Flies should not smell, although I have bleed on a fly and then had it continually devoured for 15 min. Fish have a lateral line that detects vibration so preventing water vibration is more important than noise in the air. Finally fish do not have hands and so their sense of touch is limited mostly to their mouths. This can allow you to fish strange flies when nothing else is working and fish will bite it to explore what it is.

There are other instinct to consider, but these thought processes help, especially when you find you are out of your comfort zone in terms of fishing.
 

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I by no means consider myself a veteran of fly fishing and have only been flying for 4 or 5 years thanks to the help and guidance of a real good friend. Reading a river to me is one of the most challenging and and awesome things to be doing on a day off fishing. Entomology, learning some about the responsiveness of gear and technique for sure is a must. But I have to tell you the biggest lesson I have ever learned on the water was, You must, I mean absolutely must, always respect the power and strength of the water even in small streams. Know your limits as a river walker!!! This is serious [email protected]#.
 

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I just read this ENTIRE thread (while I should've been studying) and the biggest lesson I got out of all of it is....well.... Anyone wanna take a newbie out fly fishing?

Sounds like that's what it's going to take.
 

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I'm still a beginner and I estimate the fly line on my reel is 8 years old. It's time for some new line. What would be the best all around line for fishing the rivers of CO for trout and including some high mountain lakes. I assume floating line. Double or Forward taper? I'm still working on my casting.
 

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Hehe expensive rods and reels...I spent more on my rod/reel case than I did on my rod and reel, and that has proven to be a wise move; still flinging my 5wt Pflueger I bought off of a pizza delivery guy in 1998. ;D

I'm actually a terrible fly fisherman, but I haven't made a serious time investment in it for a decade or so. I went twice last summer and didn't hook into anything fleshy. No biggie.

This summer, my fly rod goes on every fishing trip with me, and my fly boxes will be evacuated and re-supplied; I got 'em wet and forgot, now they're all rusty. :-\

My favorite tip: when you're on a rip-rap shoreline ala Mt. Elbert Forebay and you want to change it up, fling a big 'ol Pistol Pete and let it sink for 15 seconds, then start stripping. By the time you're naked, it's deep enough to begin pulling line in. ;D
Josh
 

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Begginer question. I have heard a lot about setting the hook downstream. What does this actually mean. My brain is taking this to mean you should never cast upstream. Does this simply mean setting the hook by moving the rod sideways in the same direction of the current?
 

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TT Boy said:
Begginer question. I have heard a lot about setting the hook downstream. What does this actually mean. My brain is taking this to mean you should never cast upstream. Does this simply mean setting the hook by moving the rod sideways in the same direction of the current?
I would say 95% of the time you are wanting to fish upstream. Fish face into the current and you want to make sure they don't see you. If they are facing upstream then you will want to cast upstream and place the fly above them. If you cast upstream to a fish and it eats, the raise the rod to set the hook. If you are nymphing and your flies are downstream of you and a fish hits, raise the rod up to set the hook. At that point, your flies are downstream from you and when you set the hook, you are basically pulling the flies away from the fish's mouth. If the fish was upstream, and you set the hook, you are basically pulling the hook back into it's mouth. Make sense? Down stream hook sets are hard to do and many fish are "lost" on the hookset. I hope this make sense and helps answer your question.
Juan
 
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I have a Zebco fly rod combo that I bought circa 1986. I might have caught a few brookies on it back in the day in WY, but it'd been parked in the garage since at least the early 90's. I brought it out of retirement on Sat and took along to N Cat. The only fish I caught were on the fly rod. I didn't hammer them near like I thought I would have, but I had a great time hook 4 decent fish on the fly. My set-up was probably barbaric by most standards, my presentation was barely tolerable, but it all worked out to some degree. I had a great time and can't wait to do it again.

The moral of this story: my POS flyrod caught fish.
 
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