Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm just curious as to what everyone else keeps warm in.

I was thinking of picking up a pair of Carhartt coveralls. I just picked up a pair of Sorel Glacier's which are very comfortable and easy to walk in, even for how wide they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
If your on a budget, check out second hand stores, look for wool and synthetic fabrics, stay away from cotton. I have froze my rear off in Carhardts. I do better with a down jacket, ski pants, and lots of layers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I have used regular coverall's like carharts and froze my *** off. I went to e-bay and found a snowmobile suit for 50.00 and under it i usually wear two layers of clothes one very thin and then a pair of sweats and make sure you wear two pairs of socks. One thinsulated that will wick the sweat from your feet and a second heavy wool set to insulate.
I have a old pair of sorrels and one thing i can say it to make sure when you have a set you can wiggle your toes and the boots are not to tight that you cant get circulation. Make sure the snow suit or bibs or what ever you get are waterproof.
I have spent days on the ice with wet knees and cold feet. Also you make sure you have a neck gator and a hood or good ski hat. The gator will keep wind off your neck and you can pull it over your face to keep thewind off you. Hand and toe warmers are good however i find they sometimes work and sometimes dont.

Tight Lines and Bent Rods!
Grizz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
The key to staying warm on the icfe IMHO is a hut and a small heater. Nothing beats the combo period just enough clothes to get too and from were you are going of course if you dont have a hut wool and polypro are your friends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Used to wear a 10-year-old pair of Rocky Pack Boots rated to -65, but they weigh 5 lbs. I just got a 3 lb. pair of Kamik Pack boots at Sierra Trading Post in Cheyenne, Wyo. for $35. Other than that, I have always been warm without a shelter in a lightweight pair of long underwear, jeans, and a $20 snow bib on bottom, and a 650 fill goose down Parka with hood on top. For the hike in, I usually wear a windproof fleece jacket with pit zips, and put the parka on after I've drilled a few holes and start to cool down. This worked well even at 0 degrees F on Williams Fork last winter.

Coveralls are too hot, in my opinion. I prefer a bib and parka, so I can delayer when necessary. Carhartt stuff is great, and if you don't mind the ankle area absorbing some water on warmer day when the surface gets a little wet or slushy, they are nice and warm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
I use Carhart coveralls only as an outerlayer. Most important is what goes against your skin. Use polypro or fleece products against the skin and layer with the same and you can stay pretty warm. Catching fish helps also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,562 Posts
Yeah,I'm never cold when I'm catchin! I wear layers of poly pro stuff on top,bottom and feet.Good ole sorrels for boots. I have always worn a Carhart "poopy suit".I've got one of the new black ones now. A neck gator is key.I just discovered these 3 years ago and it's amazing the diff.I start out with big ski gloves early,and switch to lighter ones almost instantly. If I need to hike to the spot I'll remove the Carharts till I'm done walking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Neck gaiters are great. The one I have is usually so warm I can't wear it for long, though. combined with a windproof hat of some kind, and I don't even need the rest of my clothes (I do keep them on, however).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
A one-piece snowmobile type suit is all I've ever needed. I've fished at -37 F and aside from 2 blocks of ice I'll call my hands, I wasn't cold. I can't stand to wear gloves or mittens when I fish. A baclava can be indispensable as well. Also, find boots that are rated to at least -40 F. With all of that you'll be good to go!! John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Layer, layer, layer.  It is the key.  I start with a duofold union suit and then ski pants.  Several layers on top, and a ski jacket.  It is a Columbia, which is a shell with a liner.  It is nice because I can take the liner out (just another layer).  One pair of Wigwam socks inside of my LaCrosse "airfield style" boot bought in 1988.  These boots were copied after a military style boot used in Alaska or Syberia or someplace ultra cold.  They are a bit heavy but warm as all get out.  ever year I say I'm getting something lighter, then I head out on the first trip and say what the heck, these are fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Has anybody seen those new Ice Armor gloves? I checked them out at the Granby bait shop last week. They are supposedly water proof and were lined--felt pretty warm. $30 a little spendy, but not bulky, water proof and warm, just could be the ticket...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
I layer, that is the only way to go. I often find myself taking things off. I only wear one pair of socks at a time but do take dry spares. If I am walking alot multiple socks just cause blisters and slide down. I also beleive in windproof nylon shells. Both pants and coat.


Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Yes indeed.... layer, layer, layer. Put it all on in the a.m. and take it off as it warms up. You don't have to spend a ton of cash if you dress this way. Consider this: inexpensivie set of ski bibs, zippered side legs to get them on and off easily, good thermals underneath your jeans and upper body, shirt, hooded sweashirt or jacket to easly cover your head and go over your hat or baseball cap, wool gloves or thermal gloves (I rarely wear them most of the day, usaully only in the morning) and don't forget the sunglasses and UV cream.

The one area you don't want to do on the cheap is your feet. You have get good water proof boots, with good insulation. Man, cold wet feet are an ugly thing and can ruin an ice trip, or even cause you to loose a toe. Sounds insane, but it almost happened to one guy I fished with, he was hobbled for two days.

There are individuals that no matter how well they dress in the winter, they always seem to get cold. I'm sure each one of us can think of someone that fits into this catagory. If this sounds like you, then I highly recommend a good fish trap or hut so that you can fire-up a heather in fish fom inside, if you're cold to the bone and can't shake the chills.

High calorie lunch, and a thermos full of hot soup, coffe or cocoa can help keep old man winter at bay as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
Carhart extreme bibs and a carhart hoody and lots of fish action keeps me warm. Don't forget the schnapps!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
CHRIS said:
Carhart extreme bibs and a carhart hoody and lots of fish action keeps me warm. Don't forget the schnapps!!!
Hot Damm Schnapps works particularly well...just don't get that low alcohol kind--we found out last year that it freezes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,347 Posts
Layers. NO COTTON. Polypropylene, merino wool or silk long johns, wicking sox. Fleece. NO fabric softener.
(softener defeats the wicking action of most poly fibers, including Under Armour)
Down is good if you are SITTING STILL. Fleece is better in layers if you are MOVING.
Feet get cold? 1) best boots you can afford, 2) chemical boot heaters (ganders or sportsman's, bps only
has the toe ones - ganders and sportsmans have the full sole heat treat ones that can make your day bearable), 3) get some cleats if you go somewhere icy - falling on the ice hurts, if you haven't guessed,
4) learn about insulating - Thinsulate only works (i.e. in hunting boots) if you are MOVING - and boots do have temperature ratings too! (Sportsmens has Baffin boots - worth every penny) Pac boots with removeable liners are worth it. (chemical insoles go inside the liner next to your foot, fabric side up)

Neck gaiter. Windstopper. (Windstopper is different from fleece, it doesn't stretch. Test by trying to stretch fabric - if it stretches, it isn't windstopper). Balaclava that covers your head and ears - most will also offer some sun protection as the sun reflects right up off the snow and can cause a painful sunburn.

Ice Armor suits are really the bomb. The padded knees and seat will pay for themselves the first day. Tons of pockets and d-rings to stow and hang stuff. The extreme cold suit has one of those 'hot' layer jackets and the bibs convert to pants. Good snowmobile suit, too. Wet freezes to the outside and doesn't soak thru. Big fly patch on left chest for jigs. Pockets are huge enough to hold a bait box, pliers, whatever(beer)
Windproof. Longer coat for sitting on a bucket. Really decent hood. Neoprene cuffs. Made to be fished in.

I sell outerwear every day, as well as all sorts of other apparel (work at bps). I know all the fabrics, weights, and technology, but sometimes no matter what I say, some folks still insist that they need to wear cotton thermals (aka. pajamas, as that is all cottons are really good for), PVC is perfectly fine for rainwear, and somebody out there somewhere still makes puffy ski pants!

Dressing properly will really make or break your day - even catching a bunch of fish won't make up for spending a day miserable, cold, or frostbitten. My ski gear didn't cut it at Tarryall, but my Ice Armor kept me from cracking my tailbone at Granby on Christmas last year.

And wore it my first day at Tarryall this year and caught a pretty fishie to show
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,399 Posts
Apparel? Co-ed nakkid ice fishing!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Code:
ePiC said:
Apparel? Co-ed nakkid ice fishing!!!!
I have no problem with that except I can not keep my hands warm.I must own 6 or 7 pairs of gloves but none of them keep my hands from freezing. especially early morning on the walk out. I wear layers,morino wool socks,&waterproof boots.I stay plenty warm but my hands are always froze by the time i get where i'm going....Any advice on gloves for those of us who don't know anyone who knits?          8)
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top