Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been throwing swimbaits for the last year and have sadly become sickeningly addicted. I have a fairly large arsenal including 8 and 6 inch huddlestons ranging in ROF's as well as 8 inch BBZ's savage gear line through's and roman made lipless trick. I am just curious if anyone is having luck so far this year in northern colorado. I picked up my first couple fish last week on a shaky head but can't seem to get the swimbaits out of my head! Any insight is appreciated! Tight lines!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
You, as I have, have a deep seeded desire to catch BIG fish. I have had fair success on the Western Slope fishing with bluegill and bass swimbaits that I make. When a fish takes them, it's a good one and it's a real toilet flush off the surface. I have not had much luck with Hudds or BBZ's but I'm hoping to be able to fish some lakes that have both bass and trout in them to see how they work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,547 Posts
Get ready to haul water. But if you have been throwing them for a year already you already knew that.

To me, there are only a small number of baits you really need. Hudds, a wakebait (either a M. S. Slammer or a 3:16 Wake Jr.) a weedless soft bait, and a bluegill. I am all about the Mattlures Hardgill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Get ready to haul water. But if you have been throwing them for a year already you already knew that.

To me, there are only a small number of baits you really need. Hudds, a wakebait (either a M. S. Slammer or a 3:16 Wake Jr.) a weedless soft bait, and a bluegill. I am all about the Mattlures Hardgill.
Thanks I have had some success on the 8 inch hud in trout color at quincy and a coupe small ponds in south denver, the small ponds were never stocked with trout.I am just hoping to expand my horizons to northern colorado where I have yet to get on the swimbait bite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,547 Posts
If there are bass in the water, there is a swimbait bite. Some places work better than others, because of the nature of the swimbaiting game. A big featureless bowl-type lake is a bad place to get a ton of swimbait fish. Get comfortable with the "one cast" concept, it changes your entire outlook on swimbaits as viable options in daily situations. Most people don't understand how it can apply to smaller waters, but it can.

I've said this a lot before, but the 6" Castaic boot-tail is an absolute killer. Cheap and effective. What is not to love?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
If there are bass in the water, there is a swimbait bite. Some places work better than others, because of the nature of the swimbaiting game. A big featureless bowl-type lake is a bad place to get a ton of swimbait fish. Get comfortable with the "one cast" concept, it changes your entire outlook on swimbaits as viable options in daily situations. Most people don't understand how it can apply to smaller waters, but it can.

I've said this a lot before, but the 6" Castaic boot-tail is an absolute killer. Cheap and effective. What is not to love?

Could you elaborate a little more on that "One cast" concept?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
you guys are dumb.......you have one cast to a spot....don't **** it up :biggrin1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
you guys are dumb.......you have one cast to a spot....don't **** it up :biggrin1:
I was thinking maybe that 1 cast can make a trip!! Like go big or go home... fishing for 1 bite, Quailty not quantity, ect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,547 Posts
Ok. The "one cast" concept is basically just that; the idea that you are most likely to achieve the best results with a swimbait on your first cast to a given area or structure. The thought is that a swimbait is something that is really hard to overlook, and the first presentation will get noticed. The bigger the bait is, the stronger the effect. A smaller bait might need to carpet bomb an area to achieve "saturation" and be maximally effective. A big bait, on the other hand, is maximally effective on the VERY FIRST presentation. After the first presentation, the effectiveness drops off dramatically. All this means is you want to have your ducks in a row when you toss the thing across a point, or past a dock, or any other ambush point.

Swimbaits are items that extend the effect of visual realism to the edge of lure design. If you expose a critter to a fake again and again, eventually the "magic" wears off. The critter sees it for what it is, which is a fake.

You want to think in terms of setting up the predator to succeed. A predator needs to have surprise on its side. A predator wants to put in the minimal effort and get the maximal reward, a successful hunt. Ambush points are CRITICAL to swimbaiting success. Ambush points are areas where the natural physical environment leads to the increased likelihood of a chase leading to a kill. So, sudden changes in the contour interval, areas of shade, edges of natural cover, the surface, mud lines, things like this are really good spots for a predator to set up an ambush.

If you "farm" your first cast to a prime ambush zone, your next cast is not going to have the same potential the first one had. The cast after that, even less. Think in terms of setting up the first cast perfectly. Stay super focused. "Going through the motions" is a very bad way to fish swimbaits. Identify the key areas and targets, attack them with conviction for two or three casts, and move on. Changing angles is always worth trying, but beware of saturating an area and loosing the edge of realism a swimbait has over "normal" lures. Once you have hit the key areas and angles, keep moving. This is the heart of the "one cast" concept, you allow a predator the opportunity to engage without damaging the illusion of realism. Being familiar with the key locations and making a circuit of them is called having a "milk run" by a lot of people, all it means is hitting the best spots in a sequential manner. A small pond might have only one or two key areas, so you hit it and quit it. Give the spot time to rest, and hit it again. And so on.

I hope that is useful, there is more good information on the concept in Bill Siemantel's book "The Big Bass Zone"

SS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Thanks for that info swimbait, that was what I figured you were basically talking about but im glad you elaborated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
Bill Siemantel's book "The Big Bass Zone" - Thats a good book!! I have actually read it LOL. However it's been a few years and I have evolved as an angler dince then so i think i will go back and re-read it.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top