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Anyone know of a good small engine shop that tunes up eskimo ice augers. Have had nothing but problems with this auger since I bought it new three years ago. Going to try a tune up first then go from there.
 

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Hey Chris, I have a Jiffy 30 auger and I used the one mix type oil and it caused me all kinds of trouble. bought the regular 2 cycle oil and mixed it per the intructions on the auger and all the problems cleared up. Also you may want to try fresh gas.
 

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Most augers as well as outboards are jetted and set for much lower elevation than Colorado. As a result they tend to run lean on the air side of the fuel/air mixture. A tune up might not do too much good unless they can adjust the jets and maybe advance the spark abit.

Also double check your spark plug gap. They often come from the factory with less gap than recommended. I had this problem with mine, adjusting the gap made a huge difference.

Dan
 

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they do have a mixture screw that does wonders as well,my strikemaster ran like dirt till i played with it.now it never stalls EVER.it used to alll the time.
 

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Dan, How do you adjust your gap on the plug from factroy spec? Would you close it up or open it a tad? I have a strikemaster, since 98. and it runs good once it is warm but getting it started when its been sitting all week and cold to boot , can take 12 to 18 pulls to fire up.Thanks
 

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Rover said:
Dan, How do you adjust your gap on the plug from factroy spec? Would you close it up or open it a tad? I have a strikemaster, since 98. and it runs good once it is warm but getting it started when its been sitting all week and cold to boot , can take 12 to 18 pulls to fire up.Thanks
I heard and I don't know how accurate this is but at higher elevation increasing your gap by .005-.010 can help.  The theory that I was told is the spark hits more molecules in the air fuel mixture when it gapped slightly wider making it easier to start especially when you are running too rich or too lean.  By hitting more molecules you have a greater chance of sustaining the chain reaction to burn the mixture in chamber more completely.  If the gap is too wide then the sparking becomes inefficient and benefits are lost.  So start with a minimal over gapping and experiment.

As I said before I was told this (by a small engine mechanic) and I can't guarantee it works but it seems to help me.

Something else I do to help with a cold start is press the pressure button (if you got one on a 98 mines a 2004) I leave the on/off switch on (i don't know if it makes any difference but I leave it on) close the choke and slowly pull the cord 3 or 4 times (no primer button on my strikemaster) this helps prime the cylinder and then I give it a good hard pull and adjust the choke as needed to get it started.  Usually 3-4 pulls to start when cold.

If you think you flooded your engine and don't want to wait to let it naturally vent try this.  shut off the gas supply, if possible then pull cord slowly several times it should clear out most of the excess gas and make starting easier.

Hope this helps you a bit.

Be sure to test it at home before going to the lake,  That way if it works worse you can still adjust the gap back to factory before hitting the lake.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's the problem I have it runs great at home it's when it's time to drill a hole on the lake is when it runs like sh**.
 

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Dan, that?s a convincing theory and I?m going to give it a try.My Techumseh Manuel says to set the gap at .030. My model does not have a primer,so I will experiment a little at a time.
This may solve another problem, it seems my right arm is always a little bigger than my left arm during the winter. Thanks Dan
 

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as to plug gap the biggest that you got the juice to fire is the way to go, with a car or the like you can up the juice with aftermarket coils and ignition systems but with augers and other small engines they ussualy have a magnito ignition and mags dont put out as much juice at low speed ie pull start so with too wide a gap they can make for hard starting but once they get going they would run better so depending on your unit if the juice is weak then decreasing the gap can make it easyer to start

also a little trick i like to use on hard to start small engines that dont see lotts of hours of run time, i call it pointing the plug. pull the plug and gently bend the ground electrode out of the way then with a small dremel tool grind the center electrode to a point (a blunter/shorter point lasts longer but is less effective) then grind the ground electrode in to a V shape so the pointy part wil point at the center electrode when you bend it back in place and set the gap

my theory on this is that electricity jumps better from an edge or piont kind giving a directional spark also the extra metal removed kinda unshrouds the spark letting it ignite the air/fuel easier only problem is the pointy plugs wear out much quicker, but with the short time an auger is run it might really help you can also get away with a bit bigger gap this way

good luck
 

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Dan,
Just a little follow up on your advice about widening the gap on the plug, It worked liked a charm .I went from the factory spec. of .30 to a .33.
We hit Grand Lake Sunday for the first time out and the auger fired up second pull, thanks again for the good advice.
We also did pretty well on the Lakers with the typical at 17 to 20 and the best 24.Caught about 15.
Ice was about 5 in. On the way home when we passed Granby we saw 3 guys fishing Granby at dike 1 close to shore ( Smart Guys,I bet the ice was only 3 in. there)
 
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