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Does anyone have any secrets on how to use a bait caster??

I have never had one before and everytime that I try to cast it, I end up with a big pile of spagetti... :mad:

I have wanted one and when I was at Garts the other day, they had a clearance table and I picked up a Pfulger for $30.00 that was normally $100.00. Being the red neck that I am, I mounted it proudly on a Ugly Stick, which everyone is laughing at me about. ???

Anyway, any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, John
 

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My advice: practice, practice, practice. Of course, it is especially important to learn to rest your thumb on the spool as the lure slows down and is just about to hit the water. I made the switch to primarily using baitcasters a couple of years ago and my accuracy is much better than before.

Also, I have recently seen some of those new Pfluger reels (over at mcfly's house) and they have a great feel to them! Combining one with an Ugly Stick also seems like a good setup.

Good luck.
 

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I'm not sure if yours has an internal brakeing system. If so you can play with that. If there is no internal, you should be able to adjust on the outside. If your throwing alot of weight, you can let it rip. But the lighter your lure, you'll need to play with it.. Good luck
 

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Adjust your brake so that whatever lure you are using falls at a slow steady pace from the rodtip once the released button is pushed,, Since your just starting out, maybe a little tighter than that will be better. Dont try and throw too light of a lure at first. Save that until you get the hang of it.
Another thing that really helps is how you cast. It hard to explain by typing but I'll try.

Instead of starting your cast with the reel pointng up, Turn your hand sidways. Similar to how you would throw a football or a dart. This will help reduce your baklashes because the spool will not start to spin as hard like it does when you have the reel facing straight up.

Hope that helps.
Brett
 

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cant go wrong with any of these suggestions. Just remember to adjust the break to the lure you are using every time. It just takes practice, i would suggest practicing with heavier wieghts till you master it. I learned on a 1 and 1/2 size water bubble full to the top (with a fly behind of course, why cast if you cant catch anything). Someone asked me once if it hurts your thumb to break. Not at all
 

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Funny you should post this question... I just bought my first baitcaster and I suck bad at casting it. I found this link that has helped me a little bit, but I still have to respool after each time I try to go fishing with it.

http://experts.about.com/q/1634/3977263.htm
 

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Everyone here has good advice. I would just like to add that you should adjust your braking system so the lure you are throwing falls slowly and when it hits the water it stops. You do this by holding you pole out ove rthe water and letting the lure drop till it hits the water. It should fall slow and stop when it hits. When casting you should never let the lure hit the water with out your thumb stopping the lure first. What is happening is the when you cast the spool is spinning very fast when the lure hits the water. When the lure hits the water it stops but your spool does not thus you get a birds nest. (Spinning under the line) Hope this helps.
 

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Just like everybody else said. Practice, practice, practice and make sure the brake is set properly so that your line drops but not too quickly. I bought an Ambassaduer setup for like a buck fifty when I was younger and just could not figure it out. Started last year again and now cast like a pro. It was very hard to learn but once you get it, you'll never want to use another reel for the big boys.
 
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My tips:
1. Avoid casting into the wind until you are real good at untangling birds-nests.

2. Dont use braided line in the learning stages. The braided line VERY quickly accelerates the spin of the spool when you cast. Mono stretches a bit and is easier to cast.

3. Rest your casting hand thumb on the spool. Get used to having it there - always. Apply slightly more thumb pressure as the lure gets closer to the target (aka feathering). As the lure touches the water your thumb should have stopped the spin of the spool.

4. Just to learn the mechanics of a baitcaster and how to use your thumb, take about a 1 oz lead weight and tie that on. Stand on a chair in the living room or outside on the lawn. Pick a target only 10 feet away. Partially extend the casting arm and rod towards the target. With the weight, make a pendulous swinging motion....back and forth, towards the target then back towards your body. After a few swings and as the weight nears its arch away from you, let the spool go. Feather the spool with your thumb as the weight nears the target. Now, you are basically "pitching" a lure which is a casting technique I use alot. Once you have that down do small side arm casts, once again picking a target close to you. Think and work on the spool feathering with your thumb.

5. Whether you are "pitching" or casting, slack in the line upon the initial cast accelerates the spool into a birdsnest. Keep the weight no more than 12-18 inches from the end of the rod on a side or over head cast and no more than a rod length on a "pitch". Swing the rod so that no slack ever builds up in the line on the initial cast (the point before you let go of the spool). Once airborne, slack will build in the line but that is ok...just watch the weight and feather the spool with your thumb as it approaches the target or the water.

6. Try these techniques with both hands, cast right and left handed. You will find that one hand is better at feathering the spool. In the advanced stages you will be able to cast either right or left handed but at first, one hand and thumb will work better than the other...you just need to determine which one.

Start short then work towards longer casts.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Everyone for the responses,

I did not have the break set at all and that was a lot of my problem, the rest is me trying to use it like a spin cast reel.

I'll try it again today, I am down to 2 birds nest out of every ten cast.

I am sure that it is a great reel, it just needs a great fisherman behind it with more patience.

John
 

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definetely dont cast into the wind untillyou get the hang of it and what i did with my girlfriend when she wanted to learn was to tell her dont try to cast a mile right away, i told her 10 feet at a time, seems kindof silly to cast 10 feet but she said it helped her get the mechanics of the reel down as she had only used a spinning reel. she does pretty good now with medium weight lures but she's working on her distance.
 

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I found a good tip when I was first using baitcasting gear was that when you cast do not 'snap' the tip of the rod like you would with a spinning rod because it accelerates the spool too quickly and tends to cause spool overrun and backlash. instead the casting technique was supposed to be more of a lower arm movement from the elbow which accelerates the spool more slowly. I have found that as you gain experience you can begin snapping the tip more and using the action of the rod to cast instead of your arm. I have gotten really frustrated with baitcasters before and even chucked one in the lake after my 3rd 'cut all of the line off and re-spool' backlash in 2 days. Once you get them they are pretty trick though.
 

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I wanted to make another comment wrt untangling a rat's nest. I never have to repool my line because of these. You can just pull those loops of line on the spool BACKWARDS and then gently pull the line out of the reel again. On the particularly bad knots, I just keep pulling line out backwards until things untangle themselves. I think this technique was described in the owner's guide that came with the reel and it has always worked for me...

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
work2fish,

You are right on about the untangling the line. Believe it or not, as much as I have screwed up with this thing, I have not had to retstring or cut string so far..

The best advise you gave though, is to read the instructions that came with it. I never do read those things but in this case I might.

John
 

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Another tip that may help is to make a fairly long cast and pull another 20 ft of line out. Then put a peice of electrical tape over the remaning line on the spool. This way if you get a really bad backlash, it wont go any deeper then the tape, that way your not cutting all the line off.

JC
 

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Once you master a baitcaster you will never go back. Be sure that you do not try to throw anything light to begin with.
 
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