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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to the thought of baitcasters. I want to try them but I am not sure if they are worth the hassle. I have two of them I got from a fishin buddy today, he said I could have them because he was done @#$%ing with them if you catch my drift. So the question of the hour is YES there worth it or NO there not and why?
 

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yes, but it depends on what your wanting to do. bait casters do excell in some areas. although you could fish your entire life with a spinning real and not miss much atleast in fresh water
 

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i like a baitcaster for flinging heavier baits and i also like it for bottom bouncing when trolling as to let line out all you do is push the button. just my preference. i don't really use them for anything else, still haven't mastered using one with light lures yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What would you say about bird nesting? Practice practice pratice? I have tried to cast a few times tonight and either dont go anywere or birdnest. Havent found inbetween yet or  is there an inbetween?
 

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If you do get one i'd practice with something heavy and work your way down. Adjusting your tention as you go. I learned using pretty heavy weights in CANADA casting roe bags for kings. After a few days it was no thing. Dont let anyone tell you you'll never backlash once you getit down. Even the pros will BL sometimes.



[me=Jay_In_Parker] [/me]
 

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with practice you will improve I have been throwing one for years and I still have casting issues once in awhile. lol
 

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like he said start with big weight and short casts, just to get the feel for when to stop the line and work your way smaller and further. thats what i did with my girlfriend,she's getting better. i still can't cast small stuff. don't try to cast too hard either as that will cause some birdnest issues. watch the guys on tv, they just flick it, even the guys when fishing for muskies on tv, they don't cast very hard. i think for baitcasters, technique is more important than power of your cast..
 

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you gotta be SMOOTH any jerkyness and its birdnest big time

so work on being smooooooooooth! and start heavy and short like mentioned above. you'll get the hang of it
 
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Don't go out and buy the top of the line Shimano right off the bat. Buy a decent, lower price model and see if it's something you can learn to cast. I've known too many people who buy the expensive models and find they can't get the hang of casting one, now they have a reel they hate to use and $100 bucks or more into it.

Of course I'm always willing to buy these people's reels at a big discount.

If you fish bottom bouncers or three ways, get a reel with a flippin switch. You can let line out and stop it with one hand which is nice.
 

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Ambassaduer C4s are a nice reel for the money. I use baitcasters alot, especially when throwing spinnerbaits or any other large bait around cover. Plus they are the only enjoyable way to Slab!
 

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I use the Okuma Nemesis on a medium action rod for crankbaits, jerkbaits, and spinnerbaits when fishing for bass, pike, or even large trout. The thing I like about the baitcast setup is that it is a very direct link between the reel and the line. The line doesn't go at a right angle through a roller like it does with a spinning reel. I think this makes for a more direct feel between you and the lure and also you and the fish. The baitcast reel wont twist line like a spinning reel does and works well with heavier line when you need to use that. You can also reel against the drag on a baitcaster and not worry about twisting line.
The key is to practice and practice some more. There have already been some good tips on this thread. One more tip I can give is not to snap the rod tip like you do with a spinning rod. When you're learning, you want to get the spool on the reel to accelerate up to speed as slowly as possible. Use a sidearm type cast and use your whole arm to cast the rod. Don't snap your wrist like you may when casting a spinning reel. As you get better, you may find that you're able to cast the baitcast setup more like a spinning rig. For starters, keep the brake set up high and use medium to heavier lures. your casting distance will suffer but you will avoid backlashes.
Try to learn how to use your thumb to control spool speed. I tend to keep my brake fairly light and use my thumb for the majority of spool braking. this takes practice but is sweet once you get the hang of it. I also use power pro (braided microfilament) line on my baitcaster ( as well as my spinning reels) , I find it's easier to get knots and backlashes out of...often if you have a line twist problem, you can just grab the line on either end of the knot and pull and the knot pops out. Use a 3 or 4 foot leader of your favorite mono line on the lure end of the power pro. You can also use heavier (10-12lb or greater) mono to learn a baitcaster because it tends to get less tangled when you backalsh.
 

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I use an ABU Garcia D6 6600 and I love it! It is my primary reel now, UNLESS, I am throwing light lures or fishing with a bobber setup, then I go back to my spinning reels. I like to use the baitcaster for everything else, even bottom fishing for big cats.
 

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First, find someone who knows how to cast one and have them give you a demo.  Then Practice! Practice some more! Practice some more after that!

I started out using an ABU 5601 C3 and I still use it. I also have some Shimanos, a couple of other ABU Garcias, and some big saltwater Penns. I actually prefer the baticasters with the mechanical (as opposed to magnetic) cast controls because once you develop an educated thumb, you can cast as well with those (maybe farther) than with the ones with the magnetic controls.

As others have already said, the trick is to practice a lot, and then just use them a lot.  I liken it to learning how to drive a stick shift.  At first, you'll stall left, right, and center, but with practice it (driving, not stalling) becomes second nature and you don't even think about it.  I used to go out and practice my casting in a park because you don't have to worry about your weight sinking and getting snagged if you are casting over grass.  Oh, and the comments you get from people walking by are great, too!

Like others have said, even experienced anglers still get the occasional backlash and birdsnest.  I get 'em, especially when I try to do something silly like fire off a long cast with a light lure into a headwind, or, when fishing in saltwater, casting a 4 or 6 oz iron on my Jigmaster and realizing, too late, that the heat from the friction of the spinning spool is enough to burn my thumb.  Naturally, I take my thumb off the spool to save it and voila, one big overrun.  Not fun when the albacore or yellowtail crash your iron before you can get the tangle worked out, but hey, that's fishing!

Why use baitcasters when spinning reels are so convenient?  Well, I like being proficient with all kinds of tackle (spinning, fly, baitcasting, sidecast, handline), so it's just another technique that's neat to learn.  I prefer using baitcasters for trolling because they don't twist the line and it is easy to release more line if necessary.  I also like them for some of the bass fishing techniques like pitching and flipping (especially flipping) where you need to be able to control the line the instant it hits the water.  Finally, for dealing with big fish that run long distances, or that require heavy lines (anything over 20-lb test), I personally think that the drags and line capacity of baitcasters are superior to that of similar spinning reels.
 

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Humph! ;D Go back to the November issue of Colo. Fisherman Mag. for my article on how to use a baitcasting reel. And in the December issue for my review of several reels...

Most of the replies are good. But the November article goes into detail on how to sense and avoid birdsnests as well as how to untangle them quickly.
 
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