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There is a concept new to me that I have recently started playing with called a shooting head line. All I have to say is wow!!! for those of yall about to start the wiper and pike season, I would strongly suggest this system I am about to describe. I have one question before you start reading, "Would you like to cast 70-110 feet of line with only one false cast?"
K good, now that we're all on the same page read on.

To make a shooting head line, cut off the first 30 feet of your fly line and throw away the back 60 feet. The back section passed the exagerated tapered front does absolutely nothing for distance casting.

Once you have cut the head of the fly line off, attach it to a nylon braided mono like line that Rio makes for this exact purpose (ask a fly shop for details). this line is a lot thinner in diameter then the back end of the fly line you all are used to. As a result it rips through your guides a lot easier.

To cast this line, get the fly line all out on the water, with the knot joining your mono section hanging a few feet below your rod tip. Pick your line up to make a cast and let it fly as soon as you feel the rod load on the back cast. That shooting head will carry the backing a long way (in excess of 130 feet if you are a good caster).

However, there are some disadvantages. This technique is made for lake fishing. In a river situation, the mono section does not float and will get carried under water creating all sorts of issues I dont feel like detailing. Also you cannot pick the line up off the water to make another cast once the mono section is on the water. However, in most situations for the fish you are using this system for, you most def. want to by finishing your retrieve when the loop to loop clunks up against your rod tip.

Hope I detailed this enough for yall to understand.
 
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I use a shooting head system on my 7 weight and my 5 weight full sink is a shooting head as well. When I fished the ocean, I had an 8 wt reel with straight lead core as the shooting head that we used for bonito and mackeral.

A couple of things - look into learning the "double hall cast". This will help you get more power to shoot the line. Make sure you keep your lines clean - a clean line will shoot through the guides better. Finally, an advantage you may find is if you buy a double taper line (instead of a weight forward), you can cut it in half - use the first half for a few seasons, when it goes bad, then use the other half (or split the halves between you and your kids, or you and your wife). Saves a little money.

Instead of braided nylon, you can also use a red mono (that's relatively light) or you can use stuff that's specifically designed for it that is similar to a fly line. Something with less memory is better. When I used to compete, we used bicycle rims to hold the line instead of fly reels - kept the loop memory to a minimum.

Have fun!
 

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Good post. I do the same though not so muc h anymore (getting old). My last magnum set-up was a a sage RPL3, 10wt & ross g-4. I used a DT-11 Cortland
cut in half. Each half spilced to mono (of your choice). I like to taper the mono and insert in (about an inch or so) into the fly line, makes a very clean joint.
This is a cannon ( strong arm required) and will cast 5/0 bunny bugs as far as
you are able. Super Pike set-up
 

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Excellent! ;D

Once you have cut the head of the fly line off, attach it to a nylon braided mono like line that Rio makes for this exact purpose (ask a fly shop for details). this line is a lot thinner in diameter then the back end of the fly line you all are used to. As a result it rips through your guides a lot easier.
How do you attach the braided mono to the fly line? Won't the knot catch in the guides? Can you think of any options for line that would float?
 

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A little bit tricky, but..You would need a beading nedle(several) from Michael's. a few double edge razor blades. Use the blades to taper the mono about two inches(don't hold down the mono- just shave
it off freehand). Get a really fine point (got to go in the beading needle) Now the fun part! Needle into the fly line; about a half to one inch, or more. This won't be too tough since you are working with fairly large diameter line ( two wts can be a little trying). A little silicone on the needle helps. Needle out thru the fly line side. I like to nail knot it here. super glue if you like but not needed with the knot. I do this on all of my line to leader connects. Trust me - it gets easier !! Fail safe ! visit Angler's All We have both been doing this
for 20+ yrs. Bottom line - no hang-ups in rods guides. LUCK
































a half
 
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