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For carp, no.
My point exactly. A well rounded fly fishermen should know how to build leader for the given species he/she is targeting i.e. streamer rig vs a nymph rig. Building a leader doesn't take that long. I'm going to put this blood knot to use this weekend. My 3wt needs a rebuild. Thanks for sharing chewydog.

I think tippet rings are a gimmick however haven't tried them yet. I see their purpose nymphing, even light as advertised, not for dry fly fishing. My focus is on changing weight and depth over worrying about how many times I'm going to be re-rigging.
 

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Blood knot away guys, seriously!

My point exactly. A well rounded fly fishermen should know how to build leader for the given species he/she is targeting
So I do know how to build a leader, but I don't do it practice 95% of the time because I find it less time+cost effective in most scenarios...

All I need to do now is fish for some carp and I'll be a "well rounded" fly fisherman??
 

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Thanks for the support Danny!

So I do know how to build a leader, but I don't do it practice 95% of the time because I find it less time+cost effective in most scenarios...
Please explain because that doesn't make much sense.

All I need to do now is fish for some carp and I'll be a "well rounded" fly fisherman??
Precisely and bass, pan fish, wiper etc...I believe my initial question to you was accurate.
 

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Others feel free to join in; don't be shy... Amusing for sure!


Please explain because that doesn't make much sense.
You're right. I failed to mention that I specifically target trout and that 90% of the time I'm fishing wet (whether a few inches or a few feet deep). For these conditions I find the setup I mentioned with the tippet ring a better choice for me.

I found that maintaining all the various lines necessary to hand tie leaders was more costly than a few tapered leaders + tippet ring + tippet. Time considerations are obviously subjective to the individual.

Finally, when using long hand tied leaders I find the knots introduce greater possibility for the line getting caught on rod eyes when landing fish; resulting in lost fish or potentially broken rod tips.

Maybe after I catch more carp, bass, etc. I'll find that a hand tied leader works best for me. When/if this day comes I'll gladly accept this knowing it makes the most sense for my fishing style and conditions. On the same hand, I will never let my fishing ego deter me from trying new techniques/technologies that when added to my toolbox allow me to be more productive on the water.
 

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Much as I am reluctant to crash the party so to speak & risk breaking up the current debate, nevertheless whilst preferring to remain neutral would like to chuck in my two cents worth re blood knots.

I have always felt properly tied blood knots were the preferred option strength wise, in my very limited repertoire for a wide range of various materials, dias, bs etc.

Problem is that as others have mentioned I have always had trouble tying them properly & invariably took what seemed like forever to complete one which as likely as not would slip apart when testing. This has become more pronounced with advancing years, as the natural attrition factor hands become shaky along with deteriorating eyesight further complicates the situation.

Consequently I had virtually given up on attempting to tie blood knots, therefore I found that vid on how to do so quickly, using a toothpick a revelation so am eager to try it & if it works for me will be eternally grateful for the method being posted ... so thanx a million Chewy Dog in advance.

IMO when comparing various knots it pays to consider all the factors such as do they perform well when joining
different materials ( eg flouro to nylon ) different hardness or softness, supple or springy, breaking strains & dias etc. etc. For instance in my experience the surgeons knot is a worthwhile alternative inasmuch as is easy to tie but as has been mentioned only suitable if one or both of the sections is short, however the major downside in my experience is that altho fine initially, it often seems to break after having encountered a couple of hard fighting fish unless replaced, which is a pain in the proverbial.

As for using manufactured tapered leaders for anything other than dry or shallow water nymphing simply does not work for me as the sink rate tends to be far less controlled. My preferred setup is say a meter of heavy nylon
( 20 to 30 lbs ) that will throw the complete rig out of sight of the flyline to which is tied a meter of say 10 lb flouro which also carries an adjustable indicator. Finally comes another length of flouro of choice, maybe 6 or 8 lb.
with the length determined by the depth of water being fished, along with the speed of flow. Such a setup minimises the chance of spooking fish whilst allowing the nymph/s to get down quickly to where the fish are ( usually near the bottom ) & imo maximises the distance of effective drift.
 

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I just tie two clinch knots together. It takes about a minute and I don't have any issues with strength. This method works well for joining different sizes of line.

That toothpick trick is the ****. I carry a small piece of metal tube for tying nail knots. It will work perfectly in place of the toothpick should I decide to try it.
 
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