Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It was slow for me today in the S. Platte just below the canyon, so I decided to putter around and scoop up some bugs (I always carry an aquarium net with me). Usually all I ever see are midge pupae (they were there today as well and larger than I am used to--perhaps size 24). Today however, I saw a lot of caddis larvae in the water, about size 16-18. Tons of them, in fact. I didn't know they came out this early, and I also didn't think the South Platte was known for caddis hatches. These larvae could be easily matched with a black head and a segmented olive or green body. Does anyone have particularly good success with caddis imitations on the Platte? I thought it was a mayfly river (no evidence of those today)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Interesting that you described the caddis larva as you did and that it can be matched with a black head and green body. I was at Gander Mtn a couple of weeks or so ago, and was helped by a Greg. Greg said he used to live in the Deckers area, guided there back when he could, and used almost exclusively a nymph with black head and green body. He gave me the stuff to tie it with. I tied a number of them on a size 18 hook - got a bunch of them just waiting to go. Glad to hear your report.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Heres the thing to remember with caddis; there entire life cycle does not occur within one day. Caddis are grouped into three categories, free living, net spinners and case makers. The free living caddis is commonly called a rockworm. They build no outer protection hince the name "free living." Net spinners use peaces of algea meshed with saliva to form a cacoon from which they pupate. Case builders use small grains of sand to form there cacoon. The free living and net spinning variety are the most important to fly guys. They are constantly moving about and thus getting swept away as forage. Case builders tend to hunker down and blend in well with their surroundings and are of less importance during the larva stage. Many people aproach caddis with an out of site out of mind attitude. However, keep in mind that there life cycle takes around a year to complete. Thus in non hatch months their larva stage is alive and well subsurface. So yes, anywhere caddis hatch in the summer their larva stage can be found in the water year round. Just keep in mind however, that since they are not constantly laying eggs through the non hatch months, their population will not come close to numbering that of chironomids (midges) which hatch year round. For this reason, trout tend to key in on whats the most abundant and 9 out of 10 times its chirono's. Even then, I have used caddis larva in the winter as a point fly and have taken fish on it. My favorite caddis larva pattern is barr's netbuilder along with standard "rockworm" patterns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the lesson Pescado. Your information is, as alway, very helpful. I actually saw the free living and cased varieties. The cased type were about an inch and a half long.

Husker, I was shocked at how much the free living kind looked exactly like the common caddis larva patterns you see at the store. I'm more into using realistic looking flies now instead of nonspecific ones like copper johns and the like. It's incredible how if you take an 18 hook, put a black bead on it, and wrap the rest of the shank with green thread, you can come up with a verrrrrrry close semblance of what I saw. If I can set up my camera for a side by side macro comparison, I'll post it, because I preserved some bugs in formaldehyde.


On the other hand, it's amazing to me how an elk hair caddis looks nothing like the real thing. I've tried up a bunch of caddis imitations with antennae and brown floating foam, swept back wings. They look much closer to the real thing.

I'm stocking up on the larval and adult forms and I can't wait for the Mother's Day hatch on the Arkansas (Sorry, Pescado, since you'll be away at school-I'll catch a few for you)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
One killer fly to help imitate all the case makers you see is called the glasshouse caddis. Pumped alot of fish in my day and its seems to me that all they were eating were sticks. I wondered why would these fish love to eat sticks. Little did I know they were cased caddis........little more educated now. You dont hear to much about fishing case builder imitations.....perhaps maybe it should be kept confidential. To me, the cased caddis is like not being picked for a game a dodgeball. You would be suprised what such a teammate could bring you. Who likes to fish mayfly, midge, and stonefly imitations anyways. Viva the Caddis Fly forever.

Hey Silicone Boy where did you get the formaldehyde and the little bottles to put them in. I want to start my own archive of each river's biomass. It's alot better to have the real thing then to be looking at some picture in a book to try and imitate it on a hook. Any help would be appreciated.

Peace

The Rocnesmonsta
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Rocness,

I get the bottles from the pathology lab that I use for my medical office. They are just the right size and they give me as much as I want. PM me if you want me to send you some. Anything to help out a fellow flailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
just about any caddis dry will take fish at waterton. However there is one particular one in a size 18 that can take a fish on about every other cast at waterton. It's called a fluttering caddis. basically rather then having elk hair trimmed at the eye like the traditional caddis dry, the fluttering variety has palmered hackle up front and the elk hair tied down directly behind the hackle roughly 1/4 back from the eye. I dont know what it is about this fly, but if there are fish in shallow water and riffles, this fly will draw strikes even if fish aren't actively feeding on the surface. Look it up online and give it a shot sometime!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top