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Discussion Starter #1
Fished Chatfield from 7-11pm.  Caught two walleye, one 15 (the chatfield usual) the other 19 inches (only my second keeper from Chatfield this year).  Small eye was caught on a silver and red glow in the dark jig with skirt, the larger eye was caught on a rainbow crankbait.  Both fish were caught along massy draw in 6-10 feet of water.  Talked to a couple guys when putting the boat in, said they were catching trout by the East marina on gold colored cranks.  Hopefully the fall bite is finally happening, it has sure been slow late summer-early fall at Chatfield.
 

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The CDOW has new walleye regulations for next year.
 

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I heard DOW was going to update the regs next year but have not heard what they are going to do for the brooding fisheries. Even with the pressure most of these fisheries get they are still getting 30+" fish in the nets each spring. Look foward to seeing the official release of the new fishing regs next season.
 

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This was excerpted from a Denver Post article by Charlie Meyers.

The regulations approved by the Colorado Wildlife Commission for the period 2006-2010 generally offer greater safeguards for walleye in key locations, while boosting the take of crappie across much of the state.
Meeting in Lamar on Thursday, the commission ratified a compromise with the Colorado Walleye Association that protects small walleye in more than a dozen eastern Colorado waters. The new regulations also serve as a potential boost to the Division of Wildlife's spawn collection for a species that ranks as the second-most popular in the state.
Waters designated for walleye egg-taking - notably Chatfield, Cherry Creek and Pueblo reservoirs - will operate under an 18-inch minimum with only one fish allowed over 21 inches. Pueblo's daily bag will grow from four to five, consistent with other prime walleye waters across the state.
A separate category of "quality" lakes will carry a 15-inch minimum, only one over 21 inches, all with a bag limit of five walleye, saugeye and sauger in the aggregate.
These include John Martin, Nee Noshe, Nee Gronda, Adobe Creek and Trinidad in the liberal creel limit zones of southeast Colorado. This designation also applies to all waters in the Republican River drainage, including Bonny and Flagler reservoirs.
Others reservoirs in this category are Aurora, Barr, Bear Creek, Boulder, Boyd, Carter, Jumbo, Arbor, Lonetree, Prewitt, Standley, Jackson and North Sterling.
More restrictive regulations for bass and catfish also will be in effect in the southeast. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass now are joined in a statewide aggregate of five daily. Similarly, the statewide aggregate bag for all catfish species will be 10.
Standardization also is the byword for crappie, which now carry a 20-fish daily bag statewide, except for Elkhead Reservoir, where it will be 10.
In a move designed to boost the recovery of threatened and endangered cutthroat trout populations around the state, catch-and-release rules were established on 84 separate waters that also require the use of flies and lures.
In one of the most controversial decisions, the policy body agreed with a DOW recommendation to eliminate the use of all scented plastic lures in waters where artificial flies and lures are stipulated.
"Scented baits are becoming so effective, fish swallow the larger ones just like a small device," Brett Ackerman, DOW's director of regulations, said of a change aimed at minimizing hooking mortality. Colorado rules previously banned fish-attracting scents in lures smaller than 1 1/2 inches.

The impact will be felt in reservoirs such as Spinney Mountain and the three Delaney Butte lakes, where such restrictions are used to promote quality stillwater fisheries. The Delaney lakes also were targeted for changes that eliminate an unsporting situation during periods of intense trout spawning activity. Fishing is prohibited year-round in the inlet to South Delaney and from Sept. 15-Nov. 15 in the inlet and along the dam of North Delaney. All rainbow and cutthroat trout between 18 and 22 inches now must be released at all three lakes.

This thrust toward species protection doesn't extend to lake trout, particularly at the popular Lake Granby. Here, the daily limit has been raised from two to four, with no size limits, in an attempt to reduce predation on kokanee salmon. A similar hike in lake trout bag at Lower Big Creek Lake from one to three has a separate genesis, this to remove smaller fish in the face of a slowed growth rate. Only one laker over 26 inches may be kept at Big Creek Lake.
The Shadow Mountain inlet at Lake Granby also features a regulation change, that to exclude all fishing from the spillway to the Twin Creek inlet from Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, also to facilitate kokanee egg-taking.
Other changes include:
* On the Gunnison River, the stricture for flies and lures, two trout over 16 inches, is extended to include a 3-mile stretch near the town of Gunnison.
* At McPhee Reservoir, all smallmouth bass between 10 and 15 inches must be released, a measure intended to promote harvest of an excess of small fish.
* At North Sterling Reservoir, only one wiper over 25 inches may be kept, protecting a declining population of trophy fish.
* On the North Fork of the Poudre River, catch-and-release, with artificials, will be in effect downstream from Seaman Reservoir to the confluence with the main stem.
* On the South Platte River, a seasonal closure, Sept. 15-Dec. 31, will be in effect for 100 yards immediately above Elevenmile Reservoir to facilitate kokanee egg-taking.
The brown trout spawn closure will be lifted on the Tomahawk State Wildlife Area section of the Middle Fork.
The closure on the new channel of the South Fork below Antero Reservoir has been lifted, with catch-and-release restriction.
 
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