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Discussion Starter #1
Since I started fly fishing this spring this winter will be my first time cold weather fishing/cold weather fly fishing. I think I am doing pretty good for this winter although I do think wading in freezing cold water adds it's own little complications.

I have:

-Long johns (pants and top)
-Thick wool socks
-Merinos wool t-shirt
-Hoody
-all kinds of synthetic and fleece long sleeve shirts
-Buff
-Waders and nice wading boots

I am thinking I need a fleece or other material vest to keep my core warm. Also I am looking into another layer for my legs. Right now I plan to wear some track pants over my long johns if it is that cold. I am not terribly worried about the upper half of my body as I have a ton of options that I didn't include on the list as well. I also have good hats.

What I am really looking for are gloves. Fingerless sounds appealing but at the same time I need something that can get wet. So, suggestions on gloves for fly fishing in winter?

Anyone care to share their setups? Anything I am missing? Any cool products I can look into? I am going to up near Rollins pass tomorrow. While I don't think it will be super cold it will be my first time fishing in colder weather and I am sure I will learn a lot. If anyone has advice for cold weather wading/fly fishing please share!
 

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You have it pretty well covered. I would wear 2 layers on the bottom (legs & feet). I usually wear a thin synthetic first layer and then wool or fleece for the second layer under my waders. You'll probably want some gloves. There are some gloves where the finger tips are exposed (so you can still use them), some where the finger tips fold back when you want to use them and neoprene gloves.
 

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stay away from anything and everything cotton !

Fleece "Under Wader" pants are my go-to, also a good pair of poly-pro socks under smart wool is a no brainer to keep warm. fleece gloves dry pretty quick, keep a backup pair just in case. Layers, layers, you can always remove one layer if you get too warm.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So went to Charlies on lunch and bought a pair of convertible fingerless gloves/mittens. These should do nicely. My concern is landing a fish. Do I just reach in with these gloves on? They are Simms btw.
 

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Under-armour makes some really nice "underwear" that is my go to for cold fishing. I think the stuff I have is called under armour cold gear or something and it's like a woodland camo pattern. I even wear it to school under my jeans a lot to stay warm. If I'm fly fishing I'll have my underarmour top and bottoms on and then depending on how cold it is and whether or not I'll be in the water I may add more. I remember fishing the blue last year in -13 degree weather and really the only part of me that was cold was my hands. I have gloves but they suck as do most so I usually will go bare handed even if it's ridiculously cold and just tough through it. I think I have good circulation or something cuz I'll be standing out in the water just doing my high stick thing without gloves and my buddy will be standing in the 7-11 trying to warm his hands haha.
 

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So went to Charlies on lunch and bought a pair of convertible fingerless gloves/mittens. These should do nicely. My concern is landing a fish. Do I just reach in with these gloves on? They are Simms btw.
Honestly I've tried lots of gloves and fished in extremely cold weather and I just prefer to not use them. Usually they're more of a burden than a blessing but that's just me. If the rest of me is warm I don't mind my hands being slightly cold
 

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Good suggestions on how to dress for the winter fly fishing season. I wear Patagonia Capilene bottoms and tops with fleece over those. For the footsies I wear one pair of liner socks and then a good thick pair of wool socks over those. Most waders will have neopreme booties so that shoulld keep you warm enough. I know it keeps my feet from getting numb. Further layering on top is done so that I can add or subract to keep from getting too cold or overheating which can be also a problem. For gloves, I have used Glacier Gloves for years (thumb and index finger tips fold back). They are neopreme and work well enough whether you get them wet or never touch the water.

I believe the Patagonia Capilene is fairly similar to the Underarmor stuff but not sure so you may have to check around.
 

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I hate to admit it, but I can tell you from experience- no matter what you wear, bring an extra set of clothes and a towel- in case you go for a swim! I hit a rock that flipped on me and went down in only 2 ft of water, but it was enough to half fill my waders even with the belt on, and water temperaure was about 35.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I hate to admit it, but I can tell you from experience- no matter what you wear, bring an extra set of clothes and a towel- in case you go for a swim! I hit a rock that flipped on me and went down in only 2 ft of water, but it was enough to half fill my waders even with the belt on, and water temperaure was about 35.
I always pack something dry to change into when done. I will be heading to blackhawk for a night of poker after fishing tomorrow so I will definitely be packing some nice clean dry clothes!
 

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For gloves I go super getto cheap.. I take my smart wool socks that I have worn holes thru the heel and cut off the toes. Thumb goes thru the heel hole. They cover most of your hands but leave fingers free. when you got to reach in to unhook your fish just tuck the thumb back thru the hole and push the sock up towards your wrist.
 

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Irish coffee is always a good way to stay warm.
 

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You have it about covered. I would add a couple poins; first, chemical toe warmers. Do it.

Second, make sure you have a LOT of wiggle room in your waders before you start piling on the wool socks. Circulation is more important than insulation, IMO. If the blood don't flow, no amount of wool is going to keep the toes happy.

Third, water proof shell. You might have one, didn't say so in the OP. This needs to have a hood.

Others have said it already, but NO COTTON. None, not even a little, not even in blends. Check the label(s)

I am known for liking the sauce. Sauce is a thing of beauty. At home. Drinking enough to "warm you" will make you slower and more clumsy, things that work at crossed purposes to your implicit objective when you go fishing. Winter days are not full of endless shots at fish in the same way summer days are, sometimes five or ten fish is a killer day. Don't farm the shots you do get. A thermos of hot tea, coffee, chocolate, or whatever (hell, even soup!) will serve much better than a flask.

Keep a change of clothes in the car in a plastic bag during the winter. If you dunk, you will not want to drive home naked.
 

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^What he said about the socks, it's counter-intuitive. Cramming big thick socks into your wader booties and then stuffing all that into your wading boots is not as effective as keeping a little air space in there.

Down coats and vests are awesome in the cold as well!
 

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A guy on one of the other sites put me on to these -- in more brutal conditions such as wind, the little knit glove liners with blue nitrile rubber gloves over them are pretty good at keeping hands functional and you can handle fish for photos, release, etc., without getting your hands wet but while still not affecting the protective slime layer on the fish. I wear 'em under a pair of $15 neoprene Glacier Glove fingerless mittens from Sportsman's, and they work great.

Also, if you're on a budget, or just want an extra layer of synthetic fleece under waders, the $10 fleece pajama pants at Walmart work pretty good.
 

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Honestly I've tried lots of gloves and fished in extremely cold weather and I just prefer to not use them. Usually they're more of a burden than a blessing but that's just me. If the rest of me is warm I don't mind my hands being slightly cold
This is so true...until your fingers get frostbite. Happened to a couple friends of mine. The digits have never quite worked the same.
 

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My dad always used leather driving gloves... Not to keep his hands away from the outside temperature, but to keep the wind off. They fit tightly and don't hinder dexterity.
 

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I didn't read all the responses to this so I will reply with a few tips I have learned over the years with risk of repeating what someone else said.

Fleece pants that have elastic/stirrups at the ankle to hold them in place when shoving into your waders. It's important to not have material bunched up down there, it will drive you mad. I use something similar to this:

http://tinyurl.com/p5z5pok

I also took a pair of old fleece pants and cut them off below the knee and also cut out the pockets. I wear those over the linked pants above. Waders often afford more space within above the knee so I just get as much fleece in there as I can while still affording movement. Pockets are cut out to because they are not necessary and to avoid bunching.

For your upper layers, it really sucks having 3 or more layers of sleeves under your shell. Again, the bunching factor will drive you mad over the course of a long day. Fleece or down vests provide the extra core heat without stuffing your sleeves full. Also, try to find fleece and under layers with thin or no collars. Because, again, 3-5 collars will piss you off.

 

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I use these gloves for winter fishing...

http://duranglers.com/product/simms-exstream-foldover-mitt-gloves/

They stay warm even when wet and I have been 4 rifle season hunting with Simms foldover mitts for the past few years and they have held up well. The only issue is if it is really, bitingly cold they are not substantial enough. I am not sure if there is a fishing glove that is substantial enough but still not bulky and annoying. When it is super cold, I wear the foldovers and bring along a larger pair of leather lined mittens to wear over the foldovers when I am not fishing or walking to and from the car.

I have been hearing some things about this company Kast, but I can't speak to their quality or warmth.

http://kastgear.com/
 
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