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It must have been something special to have fished Colorado back in the day. Back when fishing was far less popular and a puddle could produce some bucknasty fish. Angling pressure meant having too many pike in one area while the lure of choice was anything with a hook. Fishing has grown exponentially over the years. New anglers are now roaming the state looking for your honey hole and hungry to find that piece of water that has been untouched. I reckon in the coming years those honey holes will be far and few between. Not every new angler will pursue the sport full throttle but enough will. Colorado only has so much water and with a growing population it stands to reason your favorite honey hole will one day be overrun. It’s not the quantity of fish that I worry about but the quality of fish that we can expect here in Colorado. It must have been something special to have fished Colorado back in the day?
 

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I think honestly fishing is still the same, the usual lakes still have big fish... Just gotta put in your time.

And anyone can post on this? Rad. I'm gonna start blogging here.
 

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Next generation will be saying the same thing about what's going on now. People aren't leaving Colorado nor are we growing more waters.
 

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If you can get far enough off the beaten path you will still find the honey holes. Honestly, I think people don't want to stray too far from cel service nowadays, which is fine by me...I have respect for those others that want to get out away from technology....as i type this from my laptop!!!
 

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Ive heard lots of stories first hand and It was something special. No doubt the average size fish has gone way down. More so than Population and more fisherman, the reservoirs had a huge impact on fishing. Most of them were built at the same time beginning in the early 60's, the reservoirs have thwarted many of the prolific bug hatches and changed natural water temps and flows for ever.
One of the best examples is the the stone fly hatch on the upper gunnison under Blue mesa. The gunni was known as one of the top trout fishing rivers in the world. My grampa told me stories how they would drive down the road and stick a net out the window and collect the big "willow flies". He said the average trout was 18" and they would catch 10 pounders on every trip.
I remember my grandpa telling me after we got turned down a couple times asking for private property access, that back in the day property owners almost always said yes.

In south park, where my great uncle Sam Dodero was the forman of the Hartsel ranch from the 50's through early 80's, before spinney, and Antero there used to be so many rainbows that when they would flood irrigate, the bows would run up in shallow water and those bows ran 18 to 20 on average. I seen pictures that my grampa had when i was a kid, ive been trying to find those pics for a long time i know my mom has them somewhere.
 

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Dave, just read this soon after I posted this blog....

http://www.coloradofisherman.com/forum/89-fishing-chronicles/121233-new-site-blog-forum.html

My bad pikester. Next time I'll get it approved first
That's OK CM, great subject! I started this section in part just for this, giving you younger anglers like yourself and Whomp that want to cut your teeth at blogging get the experience like Eric Allee, Tiny and Mitch have mastered. Also wanted to give the experienced bloggers a place to post them up so we can all enjoy them. I just want to see the articles from the new bloggers so we don't end up with a bunch of Penthouse forum type articles! Again great subject and hope some more old geezers chime in, I will in a bit! :thumb:
 

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it would be neat to go back in time before the mackinaw death fleets or war on pike began. or even to just go fly fishing down town Denver for 6 to 15 pound browns... now i save my money up for out of state trips. i might be like my buddy i go with and skip getting a license for Colorado this season...
 

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Somethings better, some worse, some just different.

Better walleye, better front range creeks, less wiper for sure and well Bonny, Nee Noshe and Nee Gronda...

Just have to roll with what you got.
 

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Somethings better, some worse, some just different.

Better walleye, better front range creeks, less wiper for sure and well Bonny, Nee Noshe and Nee Gronda...

Just have to roll with what you got.
X2

The gunnison river for example , was a world class trout fishery before the reservior, If it was still a river than most of it would be private and inaccessible, there would be huge debacles over float fishing.
Now with the Reservior we have public use in the Curicanti national recreation area. As well as boating and a hay day of near world class Reservior fishing.
 

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I've heard the same old stories form my dad and uncle growing up- 18" fish in the Poudre was average, when it was still a dirt road. Where they would absolutely hammer North Park, in a lake that I had been skunked for most my childhood.

Good thread.
 

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It must have been something special to have fished Colorado back in the day. Back when fishing was far less popular and a puddle could produce some bucknasty fish. Angling pressure meant having too many pike in one area while the lure of choice was anything with a hook. Fishing has grown exponentially over the years. New anglers are now roaming the state looking for your honey hole and hungry to find that piece of water that has been untouched. I reckon in the coming years those honey holes will be far and few between. Not every new angler will pursue the sport full throttle but enough will. Colorado only has so much water and with a growing population it stands to reason your favorite honey hole will one day be overrun. It’s not the quantity of fish that I worry about but the quality of fish that we can expect here in Colorado. It must have been something special to have fished Colorado back in the day?
This made me curious to the real difference in popularity, so I looked up license sales for the past 35 years (info that is readily available). In 2015, Colorado sold 1,060,208 fishing licenses. That is resident + non resident. I am sure a lot of those are not annual licenses. But the rise in popularity isnt as big as you may think. Now of course if these numbers translate to individuals, then yes there is a lot more people. But you would probably have to account for people buying a week license maybe twice a year, or a few one day licenses here and there. So a lot of these reflect anglers on the water for a few days instead of year round, and I would assume many are on private water being guided.

Total fishing licenses sold:
2015: 1,060,208
2005: 856,028 (204,180 less than 2015)
2000: 953,275
1995: 953,275 (153,142 less than 2015)
1980: 719,174 (341,034 less than 2015)

Not too bad given the growth of the state over the past 35 years!
 

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This made me curious to the real difference in popularity, so I looked up license sales for the past 35 years (info that is readily available). In 2015, Colorado sold 1,060,208 fishing licenses. That is resident + non resident. I am sure a lot of those are not annual licenses. But the rise in popularity isnt as big as you may think. Now of course if these numbers translate to individuals, then yes there is a lot more people. But you would probably have to account for people buying a week license maybe twice a year, or a few one day licenses here and there. So a lot of these reflect anglers on the water for a few days instead of year round, and I would assume many are on private water being guided.

Total fishing licenses sold:
2015: 1,060,208
2005: 856,028 (204,180 less than 2015)
2000: 953,275
1995: 953,275 (153,142 less than 2015)
1980: 719,174 (341,034 less than 2015)

Not too bad given the growth of the state over the past 35 years!
Like many trends, the popularity seems to be cyclical. It's interesting that things work that way.
 

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This made me curious to the real difference in popularity, so I looked up license sales for the past 35 years (info that is readily available). In 2015, Colorado sold 1,060,208 fishing licenses. That is resident + non resident. I am sure a lot of those are not annual licenses. But the rise in popularity isnt as big as you may think. Now of course if these numbers translate to individuals, then yes there is a lot more people. But you would probably have to account for people buying a week license maybe twice a year, or a few one day licenses here and there. So a lot of these reflect anglers on the water for a few days instead of year round, and I would assume many are on private water being guided.

Total fishing licenses sold:
2015: 1,060,208
2005: 856,028 (204,180 less than 2015)
2000: 953,275
1995: 953,275 (153,142 less than 2015)
1980: 719,174 (341,034 less than 2015)

Not too bad given the growth of the state over the past 35 years!
I believe starting in 2015 every non-resident that bought a big game tag (deer ,elk, pronghorn and bear) a non-resident fishing was "thrown" in. I guess that justifies jacking the price of the big game tag up. It is in the regulations for this year again.
 

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Yea right, you're all talk! If you could manage that you must not fish very often
go up north where 7 pound browns are called cookie cutters. or fish here 100 days and have better odds at winning power ball than lunking into a big brown. up north i can catch an average of 7 fish over 6 pounds and nothing under 5 pounds... ive never had any fish here in colorado make me feel like i might loose the rod on the hit... too many live soaker suckers in Co to make laker fishing worth it anymore... or risk landing myself in jail for seeing them poaching...

seems like a no brainer to me... or save up more and go fish salty islands that dont see too many white people...

dont need a license to fish the private bass pond my pigs live on... even thats kinda lame cuz the local ranchers rape the big fish there too...

is denver considered a front range creek? didnt it have 7 pound browns in it like they used to up north??? how is that creek doing now? how is it better than before?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This made me curious to the real difference in popularity, so I looked up license sales for the past 35 years (info that is readily available).
Say the popularity isn't growing at an exponential rate.... there's only so much water available to fish..... over time those honey holes are bound to get a lot of pressure and thus an issue regarding quality over quantity. Great input fellas!
 
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