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I've been fly fishing for about 30 years and a large part of that has been indicator fishing. Last year or so I've been learning the Czech (Polish) method. Curious to how many here have tried the Czech method and your thoughts. I will say personally I'm sold on it. And will not go back to indicator fishing.
 

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It's alright.. it gets super boring when done properly... you will likely catch more fish , but smaller fish... It's a good thing to learn and have, but nothing I would do often for recreational fishing
 

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Using dynamite is like using a Kasty:crutch: ...No skill. :boom: >:D




















:tongue: ;D
 

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I've done it, there are definitely advantages in certain places. For example some of those deep slotted short runs in Cheesman are a good place for that kind of thing. Get the flies down quick and those fish are notorious for subtle takes, which plays into this system.

Frankly I fish from the boat most of the time now so its not effective that way. But some of the styles of nymphs that were born from that method of fishing are awesome: sleek, aerodynamic flies that cut through the water and have less drag than other patterns, and most are depth charges that get flies down quick and get you "in the zone" faster - which in turn means less crap along your leader like split shot to hinder strike detection.

Don't limit yourself to Czech/Polish style if you're really into it - There are the French/Spanish methods that have a similar setup but are about twice as long (15-20' leaders) that are great for fishing really spooky fish in shallow water and getting distance between you and your flies. The one thing that really makes a difference though is the rod. If you use your standard 8.5' to 9' rod, it will be really tough for you chucking that rig. Most of those guys in the comps use between 10' and 12' rods to get some length between you and your flies.

It does seem to be more of a numbers game - hence why it is so widely used in competitions. If that's what you're after have at it. I'd rather chuck dries and catch two fish than czech nymph and catch 10 - or rip streamers all day and catch only two fish that are twice as big as every one else's...
 

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It's alright.. it gets super boring when done properly... you will likely catch more fish , but smaller fish... It's a good thing to learn and have, but nothing I would do often for recreational fishing
Dead nuts Jason. Czech nymphing = boring as hell.
 

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The only nymphing that isn't boring for me is dropping a small nymph off a dry.

At least i'm still casting a dry, and working on a drag free drift that way.
 

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that is using skill there ^^^^^
 

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I enjoy it. I enjoy fishing with bait though, so I am not sure if my opinion counts.

In high gradient streams it is particularly effective. I have caught some nice fish with it. I think the idea that it only catches small fish comes from the fact that it is a very effective way to catch fish, period. You catch more fish Czech nymphing than you do Western high-stick nymphing, because you get much better strike detection. Most fish are small, so that explains the "it only works for small fish" idea. If you really want to target big fish, sight fishing and high-sticking is the way to go. If you just enjoy catching lots of fish, and don't care if they are all big, Czech nymphing makes a lot of sense.

I enjoy the French method more than the Czech method, as French nymphing is better suited to low flows and low-gradient streams, and I feel the visual aspect of French nymphing is more exciting than the (mostly) tactile Czech method.

Bottom line, if it makes you grin, do it. I would not toss out Western nymphing just because you found a new tactic, because Western nymphing has a place. If you always use an indicator, try high-sticking without one. I find it vastly more effective, and enjoyable, to dispense with the bobber and just watch the fish. Bobbers are great for blind fishing, but I prefer to sight-fish.

Get in where you fit in.
 
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