Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
okay, lets see who really knows their stuff....
since i have been fly fishing (about a year now and over 75 days on the water fishing different types of streams and rivers) i have only fished wf-X-f line. i have read about double taper ine and it sounded like the line for me. what i understood it to be is a sacrific in casting length, but ultra easy to gently cast/place and super easy to mend.
last week i ventured to using a dt-4-f line on my 8 1/2 ft. 4 wt rod. i thought it was awesome. especially nymphing and dry fly fishing using a super extended downstream drift. the following day i used my wf-5-f on my 8 1/2 5 wt rod, same sort of fishing and i believe i saw an amazing difference in that the wf line was harder to mend and control.
i never attempt long casts, rather i get into position to make the shortest most effective cast i can make. so being that is my style, i think the double taper is for me. in fact i went out and bought 2 spare spools for each of my go to reels and put dt-4-f and dt-5-f line on them.
gonna use them side by side tomorrow so i hope to further validate my experience.
how about you guys? what say you on the subject.
thanks,
tomcat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
Tom---

I guess it really depends on the fishing you do and the presentation you desire. i prefer a WF-F line, as i do a lot of long casts and fish streamers a lot on faster action rods, but i know guys that fish slower rods (meaning more "limber" or "softer" action) that like DT lines. if you fish dries a lot and are looking for a more delicate presention that is probably the way to go. i like a line that loads quickly and can handle wind, so a WF line works better for me. some of my rods are so fast i even overload them with a line that is rated 1 weight heavier than the rod i am fishing---like my 8 weight Sage XI2, which i use mainly for salt water, or my 8 wt Sage XP which i use almost exclusively for streamers. with this setup i can get alot of line out quickly and therefore load my rod more effectively than i would if i was using a DT line. I do have a DT line on a 4 wt Thomas and Thomas, this i use mainly for throwing dry flies on smaller creeks where my cast rarely exceed 30 feet or so and it works fine. it all boils down to what you like though...keep messing around with the two, but dont limit yourself to one line if you can afford it...you might come up short one day depending on the conditions you fish or the type flies you are using...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,797 Posts
i recently went to Royal Gorge Anglers, a nice fly shop in Canon City to buy a fly line and played dumb, ok i wasnt playing. i had a 3 wt rod and needed a good line. i showed him my fly rod and he wipped it around a bit and looked at the model. he recomended that i put a 4 wt wt forward on it he sugested the 4 wt partly because the cheepest 3 wt he had was twice the price and i wasnt ready to spend $70+ he also said the 4 wt would load the rod better and be less of a strain on my arm (got a bum shoulder) although he admited most wouldnt be able to tell the diff from a 3 to a 4 wt on my rod a redington FSF IM6 or IM7 grafite

he sugested the wieght forard for better casting pushing bigger flys and dealing with wind better he said the doulble taper would realy come into play if i was fishing lots of small streams and such, and it would be easyer to handle in close quarters and trees and easy to mend stuff like that

i mostly fish small creeks (almost small enough to jump) which is what he was going to recomend the double taper but i mentioned i also float tube on small lakes and would like to fish in the weeds for the bluegill so he said step it up to the wt forward

long story short i picked up a 4 WT weight forward scientific anglers mastery seires hope to try it out this week
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I agree with both Rottal and Tomcat. The WF-F is the way to go when fishing bigger water and bucking wind. I loved to chase post ice out fish in Wyomin and would be throwing big streamers for cruising bruisers. The wind and long casting distance was the big reason for this. My favorite fishing on earth would be small streams chucked full of brookies. These normally small fish in tight quarters do not require long casts. Streams like the one up Guanilla pass are a perfect place to use a DT-F where you are in tight quarters. Streams choked with willows as well require you to head strait up the stream. Here I bust out the 2 weight Orvis and DT-F and start throwing caddis and royal wulfs and terestrialls and knock em dead. All have fun and keep fishing!
Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Tomcat,

Of course this all depends on the water(s) you're fishing, but the DT definitely has its place. As you noted, it mends (and roll casts) better. It can make a soft presentation easier. And maybe best of all, it lasts twice as long -- just turn it around when one end gets worn. Nobody will convince me that this last feature hasn't pushed the sales of WF by shops in recent years.

Overlining with your DT can be smart too, since it's best applications tend to be close in and the added grains in casts <30' will load the rod better.

I suspect that lots of WF sales are for the same reason that so much money gets spent on drivers in golf (if you'll forgive the golf analogy). Everybody wants to really punch it out there. Just about all golfers would be better off with an hour of putting and chipping practice a week, but the driver's just so much sexier. Likewise in fishing, there's a lot to be said for fishing a short line and getting a great, sensitive drift (look at how the "Czech nymphing" Euros kick the crap out of Americans at every World Fly Fishing championship), but that crazy reach cast to the far bank is just sooooo appealing....
 
N

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I like rottal, fish fast action rods. And like to look cool on the river(joking) and lay out some lengthy casts. I still cast a wf-4-f on my light presentation dry fly rigs. I think the most important factor in presentation is technique. Wind is a big factor for me in line choice, places like the dream stream and the Yakima in Washington have taught me the finer points of weight forward line.March Browns still hatch on the Yak in 20 mph winds. But i do like my rocket taper for salmon and steelhead.But, to each his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,797 Posts
what is the other end of a wt forward like to bad you cant have a wt forward and then turn it around for a lighter taper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Once you get past the WF taper it's just small diameter, level running line to the end. Pretty well useless for turning around, particularly on a rod of the same weight that the WF was designed to fit. But that running line minimizes air drag and shoots through the guides more easily which will help you make that 35 yard cast with the two S mends spaced in the middle of it.

Which I'm sure you need every time you're on the river...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,797 Posts
35 yards? man if i need more than 30ft the river is to big for me...lol
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top