Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Cabelas has a mini troll downrigger for $50.00. I was wondering what kind of downriggers you guys use and what you would recomend for this spring, or this summer. I have never used one and heard good things about them.

Any suggestions or good lakes to use them on.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,266 Posts
Im no pro on this subject although I pln on being by fall. Id go with something alittle bigger if your boat can handle it. I go 1 step above the lake troll.

Id try the "Cannon Sport-Troll" http://www.cannondownriggers.com/site/html/htmlsite/cannon/sport_troll.htm

Or heres what ill be running. Scotty No. 1050 Depthmaster: http://www.scotty.com/marine/products/product/downriggers/index.html

I got mine from this place. Alot cheaper than any other place I found. http://www.queenscreek.com/manualdownriggers1050.html

Although If you buy from BPS or Cabelas they will usally throw in a rod and 8lb weight. A great deal.

Hope this helped

[me=Jay_In_Parker] [/me]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
I use the Cannon Uni-Troll model:



I like the telescoping boom and it really helps get them out of the way of the motor, etc. The electric versions are very nice, especially if you are fishing by yourself, but they are pretty expensive. One of the tricks is setting the line release at just the right tension, not too tight or too loose. This takes some practice (heck, I've had my downriggers for years and still have troubles ;))

As for which lakes to use them on, go DEEP. Downriggers (especially manual crank ones) are a pain in waters where the water depth fluctuates or is very shallow. I use leadcore line instead of downriggers for trolling in the 10-35' depth range with less hassle. Downriggers are best at places like Granby where the fish can be very deep and there is little chance of dragging bottom. There are many other deep lakes in the mountains, just check out the lake maps and such.

Another often missed advantage is that you can usually see the downrigger ball on the fishfinder and so you know exactly the depth you are at (which accounts for the angle of the steel line in the water at a given speed, etc.).

Hope this helps,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
Oh, and another thing for Cannon downrigger owners. A while back I was informed of a good site for Cannon downrigger parts:

http://www.captgarys.com/

One of mine had some internal parts that were broken and I fixed them by buying parts from this site. Saved lots of $$ over buying new ones!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
btw, here is an example of the sonar picture I am referring to (this is a sonar pic from Granby and that more faint bottom line is about 75' deep). You can see the two horizontal lines which are from the downriggers:



Ideally, you want to position your lure above the fish, but the darn things keep moving around as soon as I would adjust the depth ;) (I dunno, could be something about that big lead ball I am dragging, eh?)

As for lures, I pull a lot of spoons and sometimes crankbaits. Due to diving characteristics, cranks are a little more difficult in determining where they are in the water column...

Hope this helps.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I downrig alot after spring. I have used Scotty and I now have Big Jon downriggers. I prefer a vertically mounted spool if you are going to purchase manual (hand crank) models as opposed to a horizontal spool. The horizontal spool like what the Scotty's have is just ergonomically uncorfortable. The Big Jon's are 90% aluminum, very little plasctic. They are about the toughest I've seen. They are a little more money but I think well worth it. I've also found if you can mount hand crank models a little higher off the gunwales it is alot easier on your back, so your not hunched over cranking all day!
The biggest challenge in the downrigger learning curve is the realease. I have used probably every release sold by Cabelas, even releases designed by salt water companies. I now use the Cannon pinch-pad releases exclusively. The key is to have a release that holds the line while you descend your weight, but will release the line upon a solid take by the fish. I don't live by the rule that the line MUST be released upon hookup, but you do want the line to come free with a sharp quick UPWARD motion of your trolling rod. Most people who fish in my boat want to pull the rod foward to the front of the boat to pull the line free from the realease. That only pulls the line through the release not out of the release. I also recommend using only braid or fireline as your line.
I've used just about every type of bait while downriging. While downriging for Lakers, I consistently will outfish other boats 5 to 1 with my setup. First, find what the fish want that day, spoon, stick bait, jointed rap, artificial squid bait, etc... Then find if they like a certain color better, although I think color is only 20% of the type of bait the fish are in the mood for. I will give up one secret for Lakers, when nothing seems to work, put on a Kokanee setup. I downrig when the fish require me to exceed 40 feet deep. Above that I troll lead line. I've never liked three way rigging with heavy weight, but that is the cheepest way to get deep! Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,266 Posts
What about rubber band rel.? Have any input on that? Im going to start with the rel that came w/ my rigger but may also try some small rubber bands. Any thought on those?


[me=Jay_In_Parker] [/me]
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I have 9 foot downrigger rods and I like to have them flexed over quite a bit while trolling so the tension of the rod will transmit any hit on the bait. The rubber bands stretch so they actually absorb some of the strike making the strike sometimes unnoticeable at the rod unless the fish hooks-up and breaks the rubberband which a smaller fish or a kokanee usually will not. I suggest trying the rubber bands first (I did) and see how you like them. If they work well for you, use them. I also didn't like having to re rig rubber bands after every fish, not to mention having this darn bag of rubberbands floating around the boat always getting dumped and having them all over the boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,266 Posts
Thanks for the input. Im pretty new to the deep trolling game but after a few times of doing it, it has become my fav. style of fishing.

Thanks again!


[me=Jay_In_Parker] [/me]
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top