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would like to know if anyone has info fore the lakes southeast fishing report and water levels especially the two lakes just south of eads.
 

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I took this from http://www.kiowacountycolo.com/fishing.htm:
The Great Plains Reservoirs, located just south of Eads, Colorado, offers Kiowa County visitors some of the best fishing opportunities to be found anywhere in Colorado. The natural setting of the reservoirs and the mild climate make fish abundant in all of the reservoirs.
The most common species of fish found in Kiowa County's Great Plains Reservoirs include wiper, saugeye, walleye, crappie, channel catfish, largemouth bass, small mouth bass, bullhead, drum, and carp. Fish weighing in excess of five pounds are common. Fish species are similar in all Kiowa County lakes and reservoirs.
Water levels in all lakes are moderate. Visitors need to be alert for Spring and Summer Storms containing high winds.
 

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From the Rocky Mountain News...

April snowpack key to reviving plains fisheries
February 9, 2005

Reservoirs in southeastern Colorado are in a tight spot as another spring approaches. After several years of drought, warm-water fisheries held in high esteem in wet years have become dwarf fishing holes.

In some cases, fish populations have withered from lack of habitat in which to spawn. In others - notably at John Martin Reservoir - prized sport fish simply became water over the dam.


"A lot of fish went out of the reservoir," said Jim Ramsay, Division of Wildlife biologist in Lamar. Ramsay said thousands of saugeyes and wipers escaped during water releases that reduced John Martin to 5 percent of its capacity last summer.

When Ramsay and regional fisheries supervisor Doug Krieger launched their boat for the traditional October gill-netting survey, their outboard motor hit bottom nearly everywhere they went.

Water in the formerly huge reservoir is rising again as irrigation companies shuttle storage to make room for a relatively plump snowpack amassing high in the Arkansas River drainage. But even if miraculous quantities of water were to melt from mountain snows, it would take years to rebuild several important fisheries.

The chief survivors of drought in the southeastern reservoirs are catfish, which tolerate warmer water and lower oxygen levels than other species.

Ramsay said crappies and catfish have held fast at John Martin, but the reservoir's glamour hybrids have nearly disappeared. "I'm afraid we're going to have to start over again with wipers and saugeyes," he said.

Gone also are vast numbers of jumbo crappie that once made Adobe Creek Reservoir (Blue Lake), north of Las Animas, a perennial spring angling attraction.

"That used to be the go-to place for crappie, and that's past right now," Krieger said. "We don't have spring high waters, so we don't get much reproduction. As the water goes, so goes the crappie."

A few bright spots still illuminate the otherwise down-in-the-dumps region. Nee Gronde Reservoir, the deep one south of Eads, boasts a fair amount of water and doable boat ramps. Farther upstream, Pueblo Reservoir is rising.

Tuesday, the Arkansas River drainage was sitting pretty with 126 percent of average snow-water equivalency, but a lot can happen between now and runoff.

"The April snowpack will tell the tale," Krieger said. "And we're not going to need just one year to recover. We're going to need multiple years of 120 percent."

Some observations on southeastern reservoirs:

? ADOBE CREEK RESERVOIR: While crappie and wipers have declined, catfish are hanging on. Last winter was the first in several that passed without fish dying.

? NEE NOSHE: "There are still lots of wipers and saugeye," Ramsay said. "And we have a project to extend the (county) boat ramp in April." Without that extension, don't count on launching anything but carry-on craft.

? NEE GRONDE RESERVOIR: "It's still the bright spot," Krieger said. "So we have one that does have some water in it. It's not thriving, but it's holding on to its own."

? UPPER QUEENS RESERVOIR: "It's just about gone," Krieger said. "I'm not sure if we're even going to stock it this year." Ramsay said the puddle that remains is 6 to 8 feet deep at its deepest. Without a recharge, the fishery will dry up.

? PUEBLO RESERVOIR: Walleyes and wipers have fared well, and anglers have reported seeing bigger smallmouth bass and spotted bass than ever. The level is rising, and more water is due to arrive from Twin Lakes as water providers prepare to catch what is hoped to be a respectable mountain snowmelt.

? BONNY RESERVOIR: Once a belle of the plains, Bonny, on the Republican River, started shriveling before the recent drought. "We've seen a decline in inflow over the last 20 years," Krieger said. "There's little hope that one will refill."

The culprits include evaporation, a leaking dam and a receding water table - the latter probably caused by too much water being sucked from wells to run center-pivot irrigation rigs.

Bonny's fish were getting skinny before the wildlife division backed off on the numbers of fish it stocked. Catfish, wipers, white bass and crappie likely will offer fair to good fishing this coming spring. "There will just be fewer of them," Krieger said.
 

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well its just like it says low
both nee granda and nee noshe will be open the 4/1/05
queens has been putting out some nice fish for about
3 week now
heard lots of wiper are comming out of there on shrimp
 

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Does anyone know what the water level is like at John Martin. I've heard its filling up fast. Pueblo is as high as its been in long time due to plenty of water from the ark.
 

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Has anyone tried to put  boat on any of these lakes yet this year. I would like to fish Queens this weekend, but I'm not sure if it's worth dragging a boat down there. Also can anyone give any tackle reconmendations. I read the about the Shimp. Thanks for any input you can give.
 

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unless you can pick that boat up and put it by hand i dont think you can put in a boat at queens

mister twisters white chartreseus spell check that one

you can put it on the other two lakes
 

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From the Rocky Mtn news:

Dentry: A catch or two on this opening day
April 1, 2005

The dynamic duo of warm-water fishing opens today, but it won't be a grand opening. Nee Gronde and Nee Noshe reservoirs in southeastern Colorado - they're prized among early-season anglers - remain down on their luck for water.

They are better off than some other reservoirs in the area, however.


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Lower Queens Reservoir is bone dry. Upper Queens Reservoir and Adobe Creek Reservoir (Blue Lake) are precariously low; fish could die when the weather warms.

It has been a long, arduous drought, and the somewhat improved water situation last year didn't help. Every drop that flowed to the southeast flowed right on through for irrigation.

The only good water news comes from John Martin Reservoir, which has grown again after shriveling to a pond last summer.

"The reservoir is at 64,800 acre feet," said Sandy Bemiss, spokesperson at John Martin State Park. "It's the highest level we've had in the last two years."

The water came down the Arkansas River after being released from Pueblo Reservoir, which should rise again, thanks to a fairly plump snowpack.

The catch is, when Big John was drained, thousands of precious walleyes, saugeyes and wipers shot through the dam tubes, bound for fields in Kansas. The loss was considerable, according to area biologist Jim Ramsay of the Colorado Division of Wildlife.

Nee Noshe and Nee Gronde open today after a long closure for waterfowl hunting seasons. John Martin escaped much of the closure and reopened Feb. 18, thanks to an agreement among the Corps of Engineers - it operates the dam - the wildlife division and State Parks.

So southeastern Colorado, which usually ushers in a joyful plains angling season, instead offers sobering dichotomy this spring. You can choose between plenty of water and almost no fish, or plenty of fish and not much water.

Public boat ramps at Nee Noshe and Nee Gronde are virtually useless for standard fishing craft. The new, amazingly steep boat ramp on the south side of Nee Gronde is a monolith jutting out into space, then plunging to dry land.

"I call it The Sphinx," said John Philpy, an Eads resident who owns and operates the private Cottonwood Park campground across Nee Gronde. "Or the Great Wall of China in Kiowa County."

Even though the boondoggle ramp is worthless, it does have a certain architectural charm. Evel Knievel might have used it to launch a motorcycle across Nee Gronde to Philpy's campground.

Among the Great Plains Lakes, the only reliable boat ramp is there, at Cottonwood Park. But Philpy said his ramp won't be ready for larger craft until about April 15.

"You could launch smaller boats there now, but I want to do some work on it before then," he said. Cottonwood also is open for limited camping today, on a first-come basis, but Philpy doesn't take reservations.

Nee Gronde is low but still fairly large, owing to its natural depth. "It's still 40 feet deep," Philpy said. "There's still a lot of water out there. It's probably 1,800 surface acres. It's a pretty good pond."

The catch is, Nee Gronde's water still is fairly cold, in the upper-40-degree range, which is not conducive to any sort of feeding frenzy among fish species that relish warm water. Look for water temps approaching the 60s before wipers, Nee Gronde's glamour fish, start hitting with any regularity.

Neighboring Nee Noshe, just to the east, is so shallow it certainly will warm up in the next couple of weeks and offer the season's first big bite. Small craft and carry-on boats can launch, and wading anglers probably will find a few largemouth bass and saugeyes in a biting mood. Typically, crappie start early at Nee Noshe, too.

The catch is, Nee Noshe also will simmer first and fall into a slump (or worse) in early summer. It is so low it has split into two lakes separated by a sandbar.

"Get them while they're hot," is not good advice for fishing these shallow water bowls.

For what it's worth to fishermen, the new State Parks boat ramp near the dam at John Martin Reservoir is operable. The ramp at Road 18 is high and dry, however.

Bemiss said the wildlife division has stocked more than 7,000 catchable-sized rainbow trout in Lake Hasty, below the dam. Anglers also have been catching a few escapee saugeye there.

Not every fish departed John Martin. A few saugeyes and wipers remain. And the reservoir's crappie and largemouth bass probably survived because those species are less inclined to follow current and seek escape.

As for Nee Gronde and Nee Noshe, the first bite likely will start after the area has experienced several 80-degree days. That hasn't happened yet. When it does, prime time could come and go quickly.

So get them before they're hot.
 
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