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Even with four points, Rob still only had about a 25% chance of drawing. He got lucky, though, and drew a tag for 1st rifle. He killed a cow elk on Fort Carson some years ago, but he hadn't yet got a bull. I was really hoping to help him get one.

We set up camp at 11,400 feet.



It was about an hour hike up to where we hunted, above the timberline at 12,000 feet. It took until the second to the last day of the season to get on some elk. It snowed about an inch on Monday night, and we went up into the cold and wind on Tuesday morning. Nothing there, but we cut some fresh tracks. They had crossed to the east in the dark before we got up there. We followed the tracks over some scree fields to where it appeared that they had headed down into the timber. We thought that maybe we'd be able to spot them walking or bedded in the timber, but it wasn't to be.

We decided to stay put all day. Didn't have much to do for a whole lot of hours, so we took some pictures. Here's one of the clouds down below us...



Looking across the scree at another mountain...



The tag holder...



Looking up from where we spent the day...



We stayed put as long as we thought prudent after the sun went behind the mountains to the west, but with the light failing, we decided it was time to start moving west back across the scree. That stuff is treacherous enough in broad daylight, and the prospect of navigating it by flashlight was not appealing.

Just as we got out of the scree, we spotted three elk down below and ahead of us that had just come out of the timber. We could see that the trailing one was a bull, but not a great big one. I ranged him at 232 yards, and they stood still while Rob and I debated whether or not to shoot. Rob had been hoping for a really big bull. With 10 minutes of legal shooting light left and only one day of the season remaining, Rob decided to take aim.





We gutted him and left our T-shirts on him to discourage critters from chewing on him. It's not fun to strip down to your bare chest at night on a mountain, but this has always worked for me. We got back up to him before sunrise, and he was undisturbed. Even the gut pile hadn't been touched. As is always the case, there's no such thing as a small elk when it's time to get him off the mountain. 10 hours of foot wrecking work followed before we had the boned quarters, backstraps, tenderloins, and head back in camp.
 

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Dryfli said:
that's great congratulations! What caliber were you guys shooting? lots of good eating ahead
A 7mm Remington mag, and I'm glad you asked. It was Rob's late father's rifle. His dad came out here several times to elk hunt with him when Rob was still in the military, and that's the rifle he carried. He never was able to get an elk with it, though. It's only fitting that Rob got his bull with the rifle his dad carried out here 20 years ago.
 

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I also hunt with a 7 mag, Its great hunting with a rifle that has history. thanks for sharing this years hunt story i hope to have one in a few weeks to share
 

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Nice hunt.

I spread some pepper on the animal to keep it from being eaten.



I have a question that's never got me a good answer. Why wear camo if we have to put orange over it? I can see wearing it for small game that doesn't require orange, but why big game?
 

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Pete-G said:
Nice hunt.

I spread some pepper on the animal to keep it from being eaten.

I have a question that's never got me a good answer. Why wear camo if we have to put orange over it? I can see wearing it for small game that doesn't require orange, but why big game?
I carried pepper with me when I used to hunt down by Pagosa Springs--The flies are really bad down there and will get up into the nostrils of an animal on the ground for any amount of time.

We wear camo because that's just what most of our warm, wind and moisture resistant stuff is. Also, if you draw a bighorn or mountain goat tag, you don't have to wear orange.
 

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sswan said:
Pete-G said:
Nice hunt.

I spread some pepper on the animal to keep it from being eaten.

I have a question that's never got me a good answer. Why wear camo if we have to put orange over it? I can see wearing it for small game that doesn't require orange, but why big game?
I carried pepper with me when I used to hunt down by Pagosa Springs--The flies are really bad down there and will get up into the nostrils of an animal on the ground for any amount of time.

We wear camo because that's just what most of our warm, wind and moisture resistant stuff is. Also, If you draw a bighorn or mountain goat tag, you don't have to wear orange.

I wear it too, but as I was putting on the orange crap. I asked myself why I was wearing camo, and chuckled.
 
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