Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone has/does euro nymphing [1] and if so, what results they've had with these techniques?


I personally started using a euro style early last year after reading the book "Dynamic Nymphing" [2], which IMHO, is a book well worth its weight in gold. After grasping some of the euro techniques I'm consistently catching more+larger fish than I have in my career. Needless to say I've become a bit of a euro snob, and I rarely find the need to fish any other techniques (although I acknowledge the proper technique depends on a number of factors).


[1] http://www.bluequillangler.com/Knowledge/European-Nymphing-Methods
[2] http://www.amazon.com/Dynamic-Nymphing-Tactics-Techniques-Around/dp/0811707415
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,848 Posts
Well, I believe you are catching more... but if you are catching bigger, it's likely because you are either fishing better as a whole or different waters. Euro nymphing is great for covering water. If you're Chech nymphing, you really do end up rather close to the fish and frankly, truly big fish are tough to get close to. French nymphing is a slightly different story, but is still better suited for covering water, rather than chasing bigger fish. Either way, it's super effective and a great way to maximize your numbers IMO.

I think of it like a tool... there are tools for each situation and having all the tools in your bag is the best way to be a great fisherman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,848 Posts
one other thing, B... once you have mastered Chzech nymphing, give the Tankara rod a try, it is a whole new experience and having euronymphed, you will have a huge advantage from the get go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
@Oyey - totally agree with you on all accounts. After 10 years of not fly fishing I'm still getting back into the groove :) My leader is typically about 18', so although I do have to get somewhat close to a target, I can still target 25' - 35' out... I'm obviously very tactical in my approach as well.

While a euro style works well (for me) on the rivers I fish around here, I suspect it might be a different story on large rivers where I need to target out of my range... And while its a tool in my toolbox, I find it hard to try another tool when the current one is producing :) I think I only put a dry on twice last year, and a streamer maybe 3 times... Other than that I just didn't have the need.

And thanks for that rod link; very cool. I haven't seen those yet. I use an 'echo' fly rod which is 10' and have the extension kit which extends the rod to 10'6" or 11'... I typically fish at 10'6".


@slayerfish - thanks... I use a combo of the euro styles; depending on the conditions. Frankly I don't even recall the differences between the styles offhand :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,744 Posts
b.reelz thanks for the book endorsement, I've considered buying and now I will.

Slayer's Polish by the way if I recall correctly..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,848 Posts
@Oyey - totally agree with you on all accounts. After 10 years of not fly fishing I'm still getting back into the groove :) My leader is typically about 18', so although I do have to get somewhat close to a target, I can still target 25' - 35' out... I'm obviously very tactical in my approach as well.

While a euro style works well (for me) on the rivers I fish around here, I suspect it might be a different story on large rivers where I need to target out of my range... And while its a tool in my toolbox, I find it hard to try another tool when the current one is producing :) I think I only put a dry on twice last year, and a streamer maybe 3 times... Other than that I just didn't have the need.

And thanks for that rod link; very cool. I haven't seen those yet. I use an 'echo' fly rod which is 10' and have the extension kit which extends the rod to 10'6" or 11'... I typically fish at 10'6".


@slayerfish - thanks... I use a combo of the euro styles; depending on the conditions. Frankly I don't even recall the differences between the styles offhand :)

So many times in tailwater fishing (for big fish) you just can't get over the top of fish enough to drag the flies. I truly believe practicing with a 12' leader and no indicator is the best thing you can do for tailwater fish... I do think a coiled/colored line section (kind of a hybrid between chzech/standard) would be sweet in those situations though.

For me, big fish have always been sight fished... I have never really caught truly big ones tossing bobbers or chzech nymphing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
That bastage Oyey knows how to catch the big ones for sure. And by big, we're talking 24"+. The game tends to change drastically once you get into that size range. Once they are that size, and in a river in Colorado, they are 999/1000 times a highly pressured tailwater fish who sees anglers daily, if not hourly. Bobbers and getting close to them goes out the window.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
@pistoldog - I don't think you'll be disappointed with the book. I'm pretty sure there's gems for fisherman of all experience levels in there. But please don't ask me for a refund if you disagree! ;)

@Oyey + @Tangler
So I'm that you dude you see on the river using "tactical ninja" approaches (inch-by-inch, always from down stream, crouched down, camo on, etc.). I don't use floatation devices on my line; only 18" of high-vis tippet; so I'm not dragging a bobber over them.

I hear you saying -- it doesn't matter, the big fish are too smart / pressured even for that if you need to get with 30' of them... Is that correct?

Not trying to be a smart ass; I'm trying to better understand why I might be missing big fish with my current tactics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,848 Posts
b... don't get me wrong, you can get close to some big fish... but to me, there is so much more to it. As far as Czech nymphing goes, I don't think you are getting close enough.. French nymphing is a different story. You get an extra 10' or so. If you can fish 20' out while french nymphing, you are freakin good at it. I have not gotten much closer than 20' from big fish myself, but I am a big ox...and I am seen easily.

I'm not being critical of you or the techniques, I'm just explaining my experiences with them. I had a very good fisherman once tell me stories about huge trout caught Chzech nymphing but he never provided pictures. I have yet to see truly big fish caught that way and it's my belief it's just super tough to get close enough to do it. That's not to say that it can't be done. I'm hoping someone does, and wanna watch!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I'm sure I'll draw a wonderful response from someone in particular but, what's all the hub bub about Euro fishing. Am I correct in saying it's basically short line, high sticking nymphing? Heck, this is the only type of nymphing I have done in Colorado for 38 years. At times, I've been so close to the fish, I've had only a few inches of fly line from my rod tip. I've also done some short line, high sticking dry fly fishing on the Frying Pan, many moons ago, dropping an #14 elk hair caddis in pockets and again, with only a foot or two of fly line from the tip of my rod. For me, the problem with short line high sticking is, I need to be as close to good pocket water as possible but with high CFS in spring and early summer, this is difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
@Oyey -- Thanks for your input... I'm actually wanting you guys to be critical on my techniques. That's how I can improve; and I'm all about improving my game! :)

@Pogybait -- my $0.02 there are slight difference between high sticking and most euro styles, but IMO it's a grey line (unless you're writing a book on it). Some euro styles use a short leader, others a longer leader. For example I use about 17-20' leader.

To me the euro style is more about "the drift" -- it's a tight-lining technique where you effectively "lead" the nymph through the drift; rod tip starts outward+upstream and as you drift downstream you raise the rod tip and lead with a downstream motion to keep all slack out of the line (drift always upstream from rod tip - lead the drift w/the rod). I've never seen/done euro style with anything but nymphs, but I'm sure it can be done.
Pretty sure you find some hits on the differences if you're interested and google it as I can see I'm already going on a tangent here :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
b.reelz,

Your second paragraph explains exactly my nymphing technique. My leader is usually five or six feet in length. If I tie on a nine foot leader, I cut it short. I'll be the difference between my technique and just about any Euro method is the type of strike indicator I use. In fact, I don't know if the Euro methods use indicators.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
b.reelz,

Your second paragraph explains exactly my nymphing technique. My leader is usually five or six feet in length. If I tie on a nine foot leader, I cut it short. I'll be the difference between my technique and just about any Euro method is the type of strike indicator I use. In fact, I don't know if the Euro methods use indicators.
There you go; euro style and you didn't even know it :)

I don't use indicators other than a 18" section of high-vis tippet. Any type of floatation device in a tight-lining technique introduces slack which defeats the purpose IMHO :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
b.reelz,

I will disagree with you about a strike indicator. When I'm short lining it, I have no fly line or leader or tippet on the water if I can help it. My tippet is off the water all the way to the indicator; however, the farther away I am from the pocket, the more tippet/leader is on the water.

I learned this method of short line nymphing from an old high school buddy who was stationed at Ft. Carson in the late 70s. He learned from a retired Army sergeant who is credited with popularizing small cork or styro foam indicators. His name is Ed Marsh. Many moons ago, the former outdoor writer for the Rocky Mountain News, Bill Logan, wrote an article about Marsh. I cannot attach it because it exceeds the KB size limit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
When I'm short lining it, I have no fly line or leader or tippet on the water if I can help it. My tippet is off the water all the way to the indicator; however, the farther away I am from the pocket, the more tippet/leader is on the water.
You will miss more hookups if you are using an indicator, it's just not necessary. You will have a harder time making the distinction between fish and rock. You will also not be able to probe the peaks and valleys of the stream bed by lifting and dropping your rod.

Am I correct in saying it's basically short line, high sticking nymphing?
A key difference (at least with CZN, I'm not familiar with the other variations) is that you do not use a tapered leader since you are not casting in the traditional way. A tapered leader will eventually get you broken off due to the line stressing nature of bumping lots of rocks and false hook sets which come with the territory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
The only time I find myself fishing anything that acts as a flotation device is when I fish "curly q" indicators [1]. I made a handful of these and keep them with me just in case. I only find the need to use these in very select conditions; for example fishing flat water when the fish are feeding just below the surface in which case I use unweighted emergers or nymphs with the curly q.... I think I only had to use this technique twice last year, but it's a good one to have in the ole toolbox.

I know there are conditions in which a "bobber" is productive, but in my local fishing areas I don't find much of a need. And frankly I don't overly enjoy fishing with bobbers; just me.

[1] http://www.ginkandgasoline.com/fly-fishing-tips-technique/get-slinky-with-your-indicator/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
I'll fish an indicator. I'll fish without an indicator. It what conditions call for. Fishing with is much easier and more versatile than without. I have good vision and standing in thigh deep water trying to locate the end of my line after a 40 ft cast in a heavy run gets tiring on the eyes. I can do it all day with an indicator. I'll take that thing off in many cases, just a piece of unneeded junk that screws with the cast. That's the beauty of an indicator. Easy on...easy off.

I can't tell you how many people I've watched attempt a tight line a Czech rig over big fish. They think "Hey he's not spooked...Still there!" What they don't get is that it just stops eating. I've done it! Changed the rig and two casts later the same fish was hooked.

The biggest mistake I see are guys throwing way too much leader to indicator in too shallow of water. This results in two things; on a pressured tailwater it means fish have time to "spit" the fly long before the indicators gets to full fill its name and two, lots of foul hooks. It's adjustable....so adjust it.

Another problem with long leaders is that they span different currents. Other words you just might be doing 45 and a 25 mph zone.

A nice piece of orange amnesia about two foot long, "waxed and buffed" all day has to be one of the best rigs I've used as indicator. Not adjustable. I also run bicolor "spirals" and again they are not adjustable and require "wax and buff" all day to keep it on top but they seem to do better in lower volume runs and holes.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top