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The other day I was thinking about all the changes I have seen in my life. As I am nearing 70, and keeping in mind that I have grandkids older than some of the people on this forum, here are a few things I came up with.

When I was a kid:

There were people still living who had met Abraham Lincoln personally. My great-grandfather was one of them. Lincoln was his father's lawyer, and he used to go with his dad to Lincoln's law office in Illinois. My mother once said, "...and believe me, your great-great grandfather had plenty of use for lawyers." But she never explained what she meant.

There were no television sets available, and no TV stations, but they were soon to come. We got our first TV (black and white) when I was a sophomore in high school. We could get 2 stations, one in Omaha, NE and one in Sioux City, IA.

Some things that didn't exist when I was born:
Jet engines; nylon; The Baseball Hall of Fame; instant coffee; radar; Mercury cars; Tupperware; The March of Dimes; Seeing Eye dogs; auto turn signals; helicopters; the atomic bomb; fluorescent lights; FM radio; Jeeps; Bugs Bunny and Superman; polio shots.

Nobody had a computer, because there weren't any. I had to build my first computer from scratch components, and even to do that I had to wait 35 years until ICs and PC boards were invented. No assemblers, compilers or programming languages existed, just 1's and 0's. There was no Internet, and no e-mail. A postage stamp cost 3 cents.

My dad, a schoolteacher, made $3500 a year and supported a wife and 7 kids on it. He also was able to buy a 2-story house on a huge lot, on that salary. It cost $1500. You could have bought that house with a credit card, except there were no credit cards.

World War II had not started yet. The State of Connecticut had not yet ratified the Bill of Rights. The Dow Jones average hovered around 150. The Bald Eagle was not yet a protected species. Mount Rushmore had not been completed.

But you might be surprised to learn how many fishing lure companies that were making lures when I was a kid, are still around today! My Grandpa had lures in his tackle box from Heddon, South Bend, Shakespeare, Pflueger, and Arbogast. My brother still has that tackle box, and some of those lures are worth $5000 apiece today.

Regards,
Walking Eagle
 

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Its mind boggling. My dad used to tell us how he would see Civil War vets in the Veterans Day parades when he was a wee lad. Also, he remembered riding on HIS dads shoulders at protest march to halt the execution of Sacco and Vanzetti.
 

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Sacco and Vanzetti were about 10 years before my time -- I'm not that old! LOL!

But several of my mother's uncles were in the Civil War, and I have the letters they wrote home. Believe me, I'm thankful to have missed that one.

Edited:
Oops! She always called them uncle, but they were great-uncles.
 

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Cool post, W.E. I appreciate the wisdom of those who have more life experience than me. I think it balances nicely with the exuberance of the youth's on this site.

As far as the knuckleheads in between... I've got that covered all by myself! ;)

My Pop is a little older than you and I love hearing his stories and accounts of his life growing-up in the Chicago area. My favorites are the one's about my Grandfather and Grandmother visiting the speakeasys and hobnobbing with folks who's name's all ended in vowels! (My paternal Grandmother was 100% Italian).

(In my best Edward G. Robinson voice...) "You say 'dis here lure will catch me a fish, ..yeah? ..yeah? Well if it don' catch me no fish, ..see,.. I'm a gonna have Tony here come get ya an' take ye fer a ride, ..see? ..yeah, ..yeah!" 8)
 

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WE, not to worry, I feel old too,

JFK was alive when I was born, he talked about sending men to the moon! Humm, not a bad plan... ;D

Yeah, there were no computers, cell phones, air travel was still young, and black and white TV was still pretty new when I was born. I don't think we had fish finders, GPS, SUV's, soft plastic, downriggers, sideplaners, or superline. What amazes me the most though, is that only 200 years ago (and to think you (im not far behind) have seen over a third of that - wow), here in Colorado, there were no roads, no houses, stores, schools, only the native people and lots of buffalo.


Ter
 

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TAL0362 said:
What amazes me the most though, is that only 200 years ago (and to think you (im not far behind) have seen over a third of that - wow), here in Colorado, there were no roads, no houses, stores, schools, only the native people and lots of buffalo.
A little piece of history that always makes me chuckle -- 100 years ago a great uncle of mine homesteaded in Colorado. When people started settling the town of Loveland, he got to feeling too crowded -- because Loveland was only 10 miles away! So he pulled up stakes, and moved to Montana! I think we still have people with that streak of independence, but it's a little harder to express it in the same way nowadays.

I don't think I really felt old until my granddaughter asked me, "Grandpa, when you were little, did they have the pyramids?" LOL!
 

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When I was a kid it seemed we walked or rode our bikes everywhere.  That wasn't a problem, the problem was everything was uphill, both ways. ;)

Hmmm. ok seriously now

I had a fibreglass fishing rod. (still have it)

Power bait(ing) was using a crappie rig with a worm on one hook and  a minnow on the other.

Soft plastics were really made out of plastic.

My family went on vacation for 2 weeks with 9 people packed into an Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser that got 12 miles to the gallon.  But it was ok gas was only $.33.

All gas stations were full service, the pumped  your gas, checked your oil and washed your windshield.

When you bought gas you would tell the attendent "$2 worth please".

When I was a kid JFK, RFK and MLK were assasinated.

Nixon wasn't a crook yet.

Vietnam was on the nightly news.

There have been 10 different presidents since I was born.

There have been 5 popes since I was born.

Neil Armstrong walked on the moon.

The French were our allies. (i could not resist)

I was too young for Woodstock.

Kent State.

Nearly all cars had carburators.

Never heard of Radial Tires.

Gas had lead in it. (reduced preignition)

An actor (Ronald Reagan) was governor of California  (wait a minute an actor is governor of California now.)

Dan
 

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Well, I'm only a couple of presidents up on you. FDR died and Harry Truman took over when I was in fourth grade.

But the important question is:
What size fish did you catch?
 

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What boggles me is that someone would pay $5,000 for a lure they won't even use. And nowadays, even a rug rat can get a Barbie pole ready to go. Here are some of our tackle innovations as kids:
1. Reels made with Mom's empty sewing thread spools.
2. Poles made of whatever was growing in the neighborhoold that we could cut down without getting yelled at. Guides made of paper clips.
3. Safety pin hooks. Bent sewing pin hooks.
4. Sinkers of anything metal with a hole in it.
5. Flies tied with unwraveled string, shredded gift wrapping ribbon, chicken & bird feathers, and haircut remnants.
6. Line, well, wet cotton thread didn't work so good.

So I get my grandsons Shimano rods, Daiwa reels, Berkley XL line, Powerbait, Gulp worms, felt sole booties, and they couldn't care less. The skateboard and Game Boy will be the downfall of America.
 

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Grumpa, you were way smarter than me, it never even occurred to me to try to make a rod & reel. My most precious possession was a 12 ft. bamboo cane pole & bobber that my dad actually went out and bought for me. My dad had a rod & reel but fiberglass didn't exist, so the shaft of the rod was made of thin, round springy steel.

Likewise it never crossed my mind to try flies or lures. I would have been astonished beyond measure to hear that a fish would bite on something that was totally inedible. :) Garden worms (not night crawlers) were easily dug up and put into a tin can, and that was my bait. My grandpa had all those lures that I mentioned earlier, but I never knew about them while he was alive. I don't think he ever used them, that's why they are valuable now.

My mother never cleaned a fish in her life. She cooked them, but there was a rule in our house that people who caught fish cleaned the fish. I learned to skin bullheads and catfish very early in life. I don't remember if my sisters ever cleaned fish, but I think they always found ways to weasel out of it by sneaking their catch in with mine. That's girls for you.
 

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Yes, I'm an in between-er, too. Good topic, W.E.

I remember my grandfather showing all the new gadgets he had bought for fishing when we went to Nebraska each summer. A flasher (the orginal little green box from Lowrance) was an amazing piece of electronics that actually flashed an orange line at the depth of fish! Then he added downriggers to pinpoint the depth of his lures and it seemed like all the fish in the lake would be caught.

Me and my friends liked carrying around 8.5' long fiberglass fly rods as we walked to the local pond. They were cool. They had a pushbutton automatic reeling device that you would crank up once in a while to tighten up a spring. We used a lot of Eagle Claw gear and usually used corn or salmon eggs as bait.

I played the original Pong and was the best player in my family. I remember seeing the commercial on TV and thinking, wow, how to they get that to appear on your TV screen? Is it a plastic covering or something?

I was into computers in the 8th grade. There was a group of us geeks but no formal computer classes. We were teaching our teachers how to write programs. We had to dial up the computer in Boulder using an acoustic modem that you placed the handset into. Then you would wait and wait as the teletype device would "think" when it got too busy. It was an IBM 360. Later, we got one of those cool new TI thermal printer terminals.

One of my friends had one of those home built computers, before the TRS-80. I remember waiting and waiting for programs to load from cassette tapes. I wanted one of those so bad, but we couldn't afford one. I swear, even though computers do vastly more than they did in those days, today we are waiting the same amount of time for them to boot up.

When I started my current job at 19, there were no personal computers. In 1983-4, we decided that we should buy a couple of them for our group so that we could "keep pace with technology". They were Compaqs, cost $4500 each, and used the 80286 processor. Soon afterward, sombody predicted that we would have desktop computers on every desk and I thought they were nuts. I taught mechanics how to hunt and peck type and watched them become fairly proficient over the years. They used to complain so much about having to use them (and they still do today!).

So far, the ride has been fun and I can't wait to see what the future brings...
 

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I try not to think about it! Whenever I start to feel old,I hike to a high mountain lake cause I figger if I can still do it,I aint that old.
 

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Walking Eagle, thanks for reminding me of my first "real" cane pole. Little fellers who have a tackle store outfit courtesy of Gramps or Dad will never know the joy of that first hand pole longer than they are high. I think mine was a 10' or so hand me down that I shortened a foot off the tip for a stiffer "big game" action.

A sewing thread spool on a shortened pencil with a nail for a handle works like a fly reel - strip cast, thumb drag, 1 to 1 retrieve ratio. With "real" fishing line(mono) could handle anything in our local streams. Luckily the tilapia topped out at a thumb burning pound or two. Paper clip guides had to be rewrapped frequently cause masking tape doesn't like getting wet. Pole about 4' "light action" bamboo.

The "flies" were weighted with split shot pinched onto the hook shanks. Our early hair jigs were mostly black cause there were no white boys in our hood.

I learned to use a computer in "intermediate" school - the kind with rows of beads on wire spindles in a wood frame. Don't see em around much anymore...
 

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Grumpa said:
Our early hair jigs were mostly black cause there were no white boys in our hood.
No pets around, I take it...

For some reason that line just strikes me as really funny, because I'm picturing that the first kid that shows up with light hair will go home missing a big chunk of it.... LOL !
 

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No pets around, I take it...

The best manapua(steamed "pork" buns) on the island of Oahu when I was a kid was offered by Libby Manapua Shop in Kalihi. Fast food burger joints hadn't been invented yet and with my parents' survival wages manapua was the ultimate treat - I remember nursing one for hours stashing it in my pocket and taking little nibbles. Well, I remember when I got to employable age in my teens there was a front page scandal involving our beloved manapua shop - some Health Dept. person got wind that family pets in the area were disappearing - there were no leash laws then - and there was a conspicuous absense of stray cats. Libby remained in business for quite a few more years but I don't recall that we enjoyed their manapua after that.
 
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