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Discussion Starter #1
ok, so in my very limited fly fishing experience so far I have found that while trying to fish breaks in faster currents or ripples, my dry flies become tossed around and turn into wet flies which end up a few inches below the surface as they drift into position.

I haven't worried about it too much so far because I have had plenty of action and I can still see the fish swirl as it strikes (though the fly itself is hard to follow)

Is this a common practice in these conditions? should I be switching to nymphs in these conditions? I have been trying to match my flies to be similar to the majority of what I can see around the river and like I said, it seems to work ok. anyway, I was just curious of what you guys thought on the subject.
 

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Are you putting that silicon floatant stuff on them? If current is fast enough my flies sometimes go under but if I'm still getting bites then I'm (you) must be doing something right.
 

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i agree if your catching fish you must be doing something right
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I haven't tried the flotant on the fly yet, just my line. I wasn't sure if the smell/ taste would turn the fish off. I will try it tomorrow but I kind of like the amphibious fly action, it seems to work. perhaps it could be a new category...amphibious flies
 

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i like to fish wet flys at times like black nats and such they look like dry flys but with softer hackels i like to tie some with a foam body so they dont float high but stay in the surface film cause a lot of bugs when they get wet are just barley floating under the surface
 

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Fishing Green Drakes in that method is a good trick a buddy of mine that guides on the Frying Pan uses...ive never tried it, but hes told me later on during a hatch he will put his clients onto fish when others wont by using this trick. he also cuts the bottoms off his hackle and "squares" them off so they ride lower in the water....might be something to consider if you see fish turn on your fly and only hit what appears to be emergers...epecially if there are a lot of bugs on the water and fish are being selective.
 

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You sure aren't doing anything "wrong", but maybe just old-fashioned. Frank Hornberg started tying the Hornberg fly that's still used today in the 1920's. He believed it should be fished as a dry during the drift with a downstream mend made at the end of the drift to pull it under the surface for a swing across the stream (like a wet fly) and then stripped back upstream (one way a streamer can be fished). Fish can be caught at every stage of the presentation. Hard to beat for efficiency and it says something for its effectiveness that there are still guys who fish it that way today.

You do need to coat most flies (CDC being one exception, for example) with floatant if you want to maximize the amount of time you fish it "dry." And you don't need to "switch" to a nymph. Just tie some tippet to the bend of the dry and tie on a nymph to the end of that. This is the wildly popular "dry/dropper" or "hopper/dropper" rig you'll see or hear about.
 

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I would say another thing to consider is what is happening to real bugs and flies. If they are sinking under these conditions, then it seems to me that you would want your artificial fly to do the same...

Anyway, just my $.02.
 

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Even though this isn't really fly fishing,I think its pertinent-Many ,many times while fishing a dry with a bubble,I'll fill the bubble all the way with water and this causes the dry to cruise just underneath the surface,and it just slays 'em! Just an observation.
 

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You need to learn the art of "Mending" this is when you try adjust your fly line with out moving the fly. Hence presenting the most natural appeance to the fish. When you do this, first cast up stream let the fly line drift just below you and then do a short roll cast up stream this will allow your fly a longer and more effective drift. The key is not moving your fly, that is most often a turn off to trout.
 
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