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Just interested in understand the art of fishing with plastic worms. I have been doing some research in the internet and wanted to ask some questions that weren't answered.

When is the best time to fish with them? (specific season, water temp, water clearity, morning/afternoon/sundown)

If i am fishing with the 7 inchers, will i catch only bass?

Should i use Texas or Carolina rig?

If i give these a try at Lone Hagler will i have any luck (fishing on the East end by the dam)?

Anything will help. Thanks
 

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Plastic worms are a great bait for bass. I havn't used them in a long time but not because I have not caught anything with them. I used to catch bass at sunset and even at night using a big black berkley power worm. I still don't know how they would see it. I would go to my favorite fishing spot back home under this bridge and I would throw it right along the the middle pilelings (Spelling?) let it hit the ground and slowly bring it back.


To anwser some of your questings. I like Plastic worms all year except during the spawn but that is only cause I like to use other baits so much more then worms that I have never used them then. Carolina rigged is used more for deeper water I think. I perfer texas rigged worms in the shallows. I don't have a lot of experience with caroline rigged worms so take that into consideration when you read this. I have caught fish with both. Worms work even in the winter!!
 
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I agree Carolina rig typically for deeper water or when you are getting back-boated by your tournament partner! Trick is he keeps the boat positioned so you only see second-hand water or open lake. Put on a carolina rig and do the "non-boater" drag. Beat two hot-shots I fished with a few years back on Navajo with it. Caught the bigger smallies that hunkered down as they went over them pitching to the bluffs. Drop shotting works in the same situation unless your partner has the trolling motor on constantly while he thrashes the water with a crankbait.
 

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mikuliscool said:
Just interested in understand the art of fishing with plastic worms. I have been doing some research in the internet and wanted to ask some questions that weren't answered.

When is the best time to fish with them? (specific season, water temp, water clearity, morning/afternoon/sundown)
Evening and early morning are the traditional best times for bass, but they will bite at other times also, if you can find them.

If i am fishing with the 7 inchers, will i catch only bass?
Yes, unless you're fishing water with pike in it, even then you'll catch mostly bass.

Should i use Texas or Carolina rig?
The Texas rig seems to work best in these parts.

If i give these a try at Lone Hagler will i have any luck (fishing on the East end by the dam)?
Maybe, but I never have. I've caught almost all my Lon Hagler bass on the west half of the lake, say, from the inlet spillway and on west.

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One plastic worm technique I just love for bass fishing is something I call "skittering". I suppose other people do this too, but I don't actually know if they do or not.

I rig about a 6" worm in the Texas style, with no weight at all. You can cast this reasonably well if you have light line, say 6 lb. test. I don't use a worm hook, just a standard 2/0 Eagle Claw, and I thread the worm on the hook and over the eye until the hook comes out a good ways down the worm, at which point I turn it around and embed the point in the worm.

Now the worm should be rigged straight up the line, with the hook coming out somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 way down the worm. Try not to have any crooks or bends in the worm. Straight is good.

I cast it into relatively shallow water, about 1 to 4 ft deep, where there is some cover like brush or weeds (this is a very weedless bait). Then retrieve it as fast as I can crank the reel. The worm skitters along the top of the water, skipping and making little splashes like some creature that is fleeing in panic. This provokes reaction strikes from any nearby bass.

When a bass strikes at it, he invariably misses it. No problem. When you see the boil under it, stop, drop the line, open the bail, and wait. The bass will pick up the worm and swim away, taking out your slack line. DO NOT SET THE HOOK AT THIS POINT. He has it by the tail and doesn't have the hook in his mouth.

He will swim 10 to 20 ft. while you are feeding him slack line, then he will stop. Just keep waiting. After a while, just as you can't stand it any more, he will start moving off again. Now he has wadded the whole worm into his mouth, and you set the hook hard enough to cross his eyes. Fish on!

The bass always follow that same scenario: run with the worm, stop, turn it around in his mouth, then move again.

This is a really fun technique for bass, and I highly recommend it. It really tears up plastic worms; you will have to replace the worm every few fish. It doesn't work over deep water, and you should use black or purple worms to get the most action.

W. E.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks alot guys for the great advise.

I'll have to try that "skittering" technique. We'll see if i can hold off from setting the hook to early.
 
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Walking Eagle said:
and you set the hook hard enough to cross his eyes. Fish on!
LOL

When I was taught how to fish with plastic worms, I was always warned that if I set the hook like I was supposed to, and it was a bass, I'd be in for a good fight. If it was a trout that picked up the worm, it would fly out of the water and probably shoot passed my shoulder!

Another good technique is to ad a bead between the sliding sinker and the worm. Twitch it while you are retrieving every once in a while. The bead will "clack" against the sinker and make a sound similar to a crayfish "clacking" his claws. This is said to get some attention.
 

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Fishintim,
I hear that! My tournament partner (my son) is run and gun
with spinnerbaits and crankbaits.
I'll toss a slender fast sinking skirted jig with a grub as a trailer ahead of the bow and by the time it hits bottom it's right in front of me.
Having a partner who fishes the upper water column is good because we end up covering both. Have not dragged a carolina but have dragged a Lake Fork ring worm with split shot that has worked in tournaments.
As usual, my son has caught more bass in the front, but I've caught the bigger ones bringing up the rear.
Somehow we make it work.
 

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Mr. Ed said:
When I was taught how to fish with plastic worms, I was always warned that if I set the hook like I was supposed to, and it was a bass, I'd be in for a good fight. If it was a trout that picked up the worm, it would fly out of the water and probably shoot passed my shoulder!
I once saw my dad, with his heavy duty catfishing rig, set the hook on a catfish and jerk a 6 pound channel cat clear out of the water and over his head. Now that's called "setting the hook"! :D I was rolling and kicking on the ground, funniest thing I ever saw.
 

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Walking Eagle I understand where you are going with that technique but I was wondering if you deep hook a lot of bass that way? It just seems that you would. Since I am a catch and release kinda guy I worry about that kind of stuff. I really hate to make a bass bleed.
 

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Yep, leave it to W.E. to turn a plastic worm into a buzz bait. :D

I have deep hooked some bass that way, but surprisingly few, maybe 1 or 2 a year. I think the fish has two things going in his favor. First, as I mentioned, the bass always runs with the worm, then stops a while, then moves again. If you set the hook right then, he has not swallowed the worm yet, he just has it all wadded up in his mouth. If you wait too long after he moves out again, he will swallow it. So the few I deep hooked were my own fault. Second, I think having the point embedded in the worm helps protect the fish to some extent. The hook moves forward while ripping through the worm, making it more likely that he will be hooked in the mouth. He may not be hooked right at the edge of the lip, but the hook usually won't be way deep, either.

If you are concerned, you can always crimp the barb down on the hook, to make it easy to remove even if it's deep. As long as you keep some tension on the line while fighting the fish, you will still bring him in.

(You understand, when I call a fish "him", I'm not actually making any judgements about its gender. It's just that I'm inclined to be more gallant to females.) :)
 
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Walking Eagle said:
(You understand, when I call a fish "him", I'm not actually making any judgements about its gender. It's just that I'm inclined to be more gallant to females.)
Cripes! How politically correct do we need to get to post questions, advice, or fishing reports on the forum?

W.E. - you kill as many fish as you want and use whatever method you'd like. I'm not going to judge you either way...just going to enjoy fishing like I always have, absorb any advice offered and interpret that advice in my own way, and help out where I can.


[making note of rule #639 - never call a fish a he or a she as people will get offended - even if it was caught on a pink bait]
 
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