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Looking for a little guidance. My wife is new to flyfishing and needs to catch a trout or two -- we both got skunked the first time we went flyfishing last summer. :-[ Catching something may be what she needs to stick with it. She's kinda on the fence now. I don't think she's ready to deal with moving water (line mending, etc.) yet. She can cast 20-30 feet pretty well, as long as she doesn't have to hit a precise target.

So, what I'm looking for is stillwater, room for backcasts, and lots of stocked keeper-sized trout, hopefully willing to take dries. We live in the SW Denver metro area, but up to a three hour drive would be fine.

Thanks for the help!

D
 

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In all honesty... My advice would be to hire a guide for a day. Lots of the flyshops around here do guided trips on private waters that are loaded with fish. You will be on the river, but the guide will help you out tremendously. Take my boss for instance, Jeremy, he takes you out and hes a great guy while working with beginners. He will get you into some fish. I think a little money on a trip is worth the knowledge you will gain from it. I have been on quite a few float trips where I went in knowing nothing and came out with so much base to actually go to a water to catch a fish. that sentence sucked... oh well... lol...

If you want some more information on guided trips, PM me...
 

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Well a guide is all well and good until you get the sticker shock of what it costs. So here is my suggestion. 11 Mile Canyon is just one of those spots that is easy to fish. I took a buddy up there Monday and got him to catch his first fish. I think the cool thing about up there is you can find pools with fish in them and see them which makes fishing a little more interesting than blind casting into a river and hope theres something by that big rock. My other suggeston is have someone else teach her. I have taught several of my buddies wives just for the fact theres not the whole married together stress involved in fishing. So find someone that you both get along with and try having them teach her. Hopefully that helps


Fish
 
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I would suggest finding a smaller stream in your area that is loaded with brookies. Catching fish is what it's all about so why not make it easy on yourself. Making long fancy casts is not what it's about, at least not when you're starting. I taught my wife, two kids and a couple of others so I know a little of what I speak.
Or, if you got lots of money, you could cheat, hire a guide and you'd have instant success.
 

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ok... yes I will admit hiring a guide is expensive, I never tried to hide that fact, I outright told it. And it is not cheating, I said that hiring a guide would teach you a lot. Who better to teach you than someone who fishes 200+ days a year? All I was saying was hiring a guide for one day would teach you so much. For that matter, DONT go on a private stream, hire them to take you to Deckers or the dream stream or even elevenmile canyon. so you can go back and use the knowledge they taught you. Its cheaper and you can use the specific knowledge for that section. Take the line control skills you learn from whoever, do like I did, and spend about an hour each day in the fly shop before you fish. That is what I did.
 
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Sorry TimberlineArcher, I used the wrong word to try to convey my point. :-[ But it's coming from a fly fisher that's never hired a guide, mostly because of money, maybe partly out of stubborness. No, come to think of it, it's pretty much the money.
Hiring a guide doesn't mean you're a cheater, it just means you have the dough and you can take a short-cut. It's kind of like hiring a professional trainer to get in shape instead of setting up your own regime and trying it solo. There's nothing wrong with it, but the thought is foreign to me.
Anyway D-Moe, if you've got plenty of time and not too much money, get out and do it yourself. If you got the cash and don't have as much time to figure it out on your own, hire a guide.  :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the good input!   :)
   
I (personally) think getting a guide to work with a novice would be a big waste of money.  I may look into warm-water opportunities.  The wife has never caught anything on a flyrod.  Practicing casting and landing a few panfish may be just what she needs.  I'll probably wait a few weeks and hit the S. Platte Ponds.
     

   
 

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I don't know if this will help, but my wife and I signed up for a "free" class with - I think it was The Hatch Fly Shop in Evergreen. Anyway, it was a two day deal. The first day they taught us about technique, knots, casting, etc. The second day, we went fishing for a half of a day to a stream of our choice (Although, he had a few suggestions). We ended up going to fish the South Platte out of Deckers.

The nice thing about the program was the guide spent most of his time with my wife showing her the proper techniques (or at least the techniques familiar to him). What I really appreciated though was the fact that he taught us the techniques to use streamers, nymphs, drys, and wets. It was a lot to learn on one day on the river, but my wife was not intimidated and was willing to learn from a stranger (Sometimes, I just don't have the patience). The best part of the whole deal was my wife caught a fish and I caught some too.

Even though the class was "free", we ended up purchasing some flys that they recommended and we tipped the guide after the half day of fishing. All in all I think we were out $50 at the end of the experience.

Trust me, I'm cheap but the whole experience really seemed worth it to me. Although I had some experience in fly fishing prior to the class, I did learn a few new tricks (truth be known, I always learn a few tricks everytime I go fishing - some good, some bad).

Sorry for the long post, but I hope you consider trying one of the classes. I learned about them from the Denver Post sports section.

Sharptail
 

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haha... my next post was going to be about a class with the Hatch... sadly no more hatch in Evergreen, but there still is one in pine junction. The Hatch offers some great classes
 

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What has worked for me and my wife may not work for yours, but here goes.
There is a small pond at Alma SWA that we have caught as many as 30 stocker bows in an hour. It's small, it's not real pretty but the fish usually cooperate. The same can be said for Fairplay Beach right in town behind the Pizza Hut. This area is a bit more grown up with vegitation, again, ugly but the fish usually bite. After this why not try Tarryall or Spinney which offer better suroundings and bigger fish. Both of these offer tons of OPEN areas to cast. I would personally have her work on roll casting until she feels comfortable and starts to catch some fish and then progress to backcasting. I am no expert, by any means, but this has worked for me. Also if she isn't getting happy with this method, a lightweight spinning outfit can often work wonders. I know some people distain them, but there are times when they are very effective.
 
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whadleyco said:
There is a small pond at Alma SWA
I have to strongly agree with this suggestion. Was there last November and I had a fish nearly every cast. The bite was wide open - all fun stockers. It was the first time I fished it (was driving by so I stopped and took out the rod). I could see a potential issue with wind (since it is at the base of the pass) but I didn't have a problem when I was there.

A possible day trip would be down HWY 285 then towards Hoosier Pass/Breckenridge. Stop and get some practice there, then head into Frisco and try the Blue at the factory stores. Things don't work out - there's shopping and other things to do. Between last Sunday and Memorial Day, you shouldn't have the big crowds going home!
 

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People often frown on the price of a guided trip...however, as I am just getting into the industry I am learning a lot about what drives that price. Let me start by saying fly shops don't make squat through guiding. Let's consider the fee's they have. The worst of which is liability insurance. For anything involving water, liability insurance protecting a company against being suide in the event someone should drown; carries a rediculous price (somewhere in the range of 20,000/year). There are also additional fee's which must be paid in order to commercially make profit of public water (another high total but I dont know the exact numbers). The other fees go to the guides actually taking you out. typically on a trip that costs 350 the guide will pocket 100-150 of that. Now considering the costs of equipment, paying the bills of a building etc... you can see there isn't any money in it. So dont blame the shops for the price...blame the system--water fees, jackass's sewing, insurance, taxes and everything we hate in this day in age. So if a guided trip could cost 150 dollars...believe me they would. Unfortunetly, if that was the going rate there would be no more guide services. Where the guide shops make there money is through retail...The hopes are that after you have a good day on the river, you might continue to shop through that fly shop and buy a rod, waders etc.
 

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spend the money on the guide. She did not catch fish last time because she was not listening to you and you both were frustrated with each other. ..... She will listen better to some else. If she gets frustrated. It is with the guide not you. Guides have very good patiences with their clients. You both will have a good time. fish or no fish.
 

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I have heard that a spouse or boyfriend or girlfriend should never teach someone to flyfish. I just think people learn better with other people for whatever... not their spouses...
 

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Hey D-Moe I agree that a guide trip would be a great way to start your wife into some fun stress free fishing. I used to guide on the S. Platte and sometimes I would have to put the husband on one part of the river and the wife on another,not for the reason you would think. It was usually because the husband would tell me to spend my time teaching his wife and after 1-2 hrs of instruction she was outfishing him!lol
It was always easier to teach women how to flyfish because their egos arent tied up in how well they do,some would just as well watch the fish as fish for them.
Eleven mile Canyon is a good place for beginners,you can see the fish and you dont have to cast too far or be that precise,just need the right flies. I fish almost every week,mostly Mondays or Tuesdays but on occasion on the weekends. I would be happy to help if we can get our schedules together,I have equipment for several people or you can bring your own. PM me if your interested.
 

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Went last weekend with first time EVER fly fishing wife, guided float at Grey Reef, North platte. She had a ball , was worth every cent. Fisrt Pic. Shops can teach her alot without guiding her and give you a few places to try out on your own. Wife's 2nd day was wade fishing, no guide. clumsy but fun and caught a 21" bow on size 18 PMD nymph



 

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I was in the same exact situation as you are 7 years ago. I got a guide for my wife her first time out and she caught 40-50 fish. As soon as we finished fishing she insisted that we get her a full set up of gear and tackle of her own for fly fishing. We now fish regularly together and she usually catches fish. Its the best $350.00 I ever spent. Now we have a great common interest in the mountains we can enjoy together. If the experience was bad she would have been very reluctant to go again...let alone want all of her own gear. Getting her off to a great start got her excited and motivated to do it and she was convinced she could catch fish on a fly rod since she caught 40-50.
 
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