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I recently decided to start fly fishing and today was my first time on my own (I have gone with a guide before). I thought I would try out Boulder creek because it is fairly close to Denver. I spent more time losing flies in trees and on the bottom and only hooked one fish ( i didn't land it but that was my fault). There was also always someone swimming, throwing rocks, or letting go thier dog play right where the fish were. Does anyone know a good river within an hour of Denver with good fishing and is not lined by thick trees everywhere? I don't care about giant fish, I just want a chance to catch a trout while I slowly improve my bad presentations?.
 

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I recently decided to start fly fishing and today was my first time on my own (I have gone with a guide before). I thought I would try out Boulder creek because it is fairly close to Denver. I spent more time losing flies in trees and on the bottom and only hooked one fish ( i didn't land it but that was my fault). There was also always someone swimming, throwing rocks, or letting go thier dog play right where the fish were. Does anyone know a good river within an hour of Denver with good fishing and is not lined by thick trees everywhere? I don't care about giant fish, I just want a chance to catch a trout while I slowly improve my bad presentations?.
Boulder creek is a fantastic creek to cut your teeth on.

Flies in trees is just part of the game until you get better at casting. Using the current to tension cast with a single motion forward, sidearm casting keeping the line just above the water instead of up where branches are, compacting your cast, and reducing your number of false casts to one will all come in time.

Losing flies on the bottom - reduce your weight and or shorten your bobber length. You will need to adjust these components from hole to hole and run to run to account for current and depth. Experienced fly fisherman are constantly tweaking their rigs for the circumstance. You will run into these issues no matter where you fish.

Regarding crowds, go earlier in the day if you are gonna go to the human stretches, or drive up the canyon a bit. You can easily find isolation on BC and it's all good water, trust me.

Clear Creek and Bear Creek should be on your radar as well.
 

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Hit the free stone streams with elk hair caddis. It is a very forgiving fly while you are refining your presentations. The naturals will skitter some on the surface, some dive to lay eggs and they all swim up when they are hatching. So if you get a little drag here and there or flub your mend all is not lost. Also free stones with soft hackles, cast up and across, dead drift, then let it swing thru the current, water load and forward cast. Eliminates the need for false casting, you can work on mending/dead drift. I have taken fish with both elk hair caddis and soft hackles while looking thru my fly box with line out at the end of the swing and the rod under my arm. And last but not least learn to roll cast.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRaCV5c63mY

http://www.intheriffle.com/fishing-videos/fly-tying/guides-choice-hares-ear/
 

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Clear Creek has great pocket waters for beginners. Try the furthest West exit. Use big attractor patterns on top in the pocket waters. It's fun to see the browns come up and grab the flies. I like a size 14 or 12 parachute adams. Or a size 10 black woolly bugger works as well.
 

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I can't remember what this trail area is called right now, but the South Platte above Chatfield reservoir has a bountiful population of browns and rainbows. You can hike or bike the trail all the way to just below Strontia Springs...I think. It has been a while. But a small elk hair caddis, or blue winged olive in cloudy conditions, or dropping just about any 18 or smaller nymph in the usual suspects (RS2, WD 40, Black Beauty, copper johns, etc will produce fish. Easy access, and as I recall not a lot of pressure. Lots of hikers and bikers, but I don't recall seeing a lot of fishermen there.

Good luck.
 
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