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Same old story, it's not the same lake it was in the 80s, they cleaned it up of nutrients and now the Kokanee starve, the on going high water is the worst situation for the kokes, there main purpose there now is a cheap feed for the Lakers, they are doing there job.
We have other egg supplies now that are successful and we are better at collecting eggs from smaller reservoirs with the Merwin traps so it's not such a big deal.
The last several years they shut the operation down there early because they didn't need the eggs, hatcheries can only handle so many.

I'd like to see studies started on introducing lake Whitefish, they are bottom dwellers, feed on Mysis shrimp and are a good food source for the lake trout, they would take pressure off the Kokanee while helping the low nutrient situation. The only thing helping reduce Mysis populations currently are the lakers.
 

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I certainly wouldn't mind seeing a few whitefish in CO. That would be another fun species to target. But from what I've read there is a delicate balance and it seems as if no one has found the perfect medium yet. As long as they keep up the studies and don't do anything drastic I will support the biologists.
 

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What's the Over/Under on a Granby Death Fleet? Three years?
 

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It looks like CPW is cranking up the hype machine and the Denver Post is playing the role of shills also...its all the fault of those ravenous and voracious lake trout...the article is written to sound like Little Red Ridingkoke bumps into the lake trout on the way to Grandmothers Roaring Judy house...

http://www.denverpost.com/willoughby/ci_27179862/granby-kokanee-egg-count-down


SCOTT WILLOUGHBY

Granby kokanee egg count down
By Scott Willoughby
The Denver Post

GRANBY — Disturbing as Friday's announcement that the ailing upper Colorado River will soon lose even more water to trans-mountain diversion may be, most fishermen and fans of the Middle Park region saw that one coming. Northern Water had no intention of allowing the Windy Gap Firming Project to fail.

But it turns out there's even more Trouble in river city than any of us knew. And yes, that's with a capital "T," which rhymes with "P," which stands for pool.

The pool in this instance would be Lake Granby, coincidentally the storage pool for Windy Gap water pulled from the Colorado and eventually pumped across the Continental Divide through the Colorado-Big Thompson Project. The deep-water reservoir traditionally serves as one of the top two egg producers for kokanee salmon in Colorado along with Blue Mesa Reservoir in Gunnison County.

Or at least it did.



Colorado Parks and Wildlife crews just wrapped up their yearly kokanee salmon egg collection at Lake Granby and nearby Wolford Mountain and Williams Fork reservoirs, discovering a significant crash in salmon populations and egg production at historically productive Granby. The large lake yielded only 72,000 eggs this year, where egg numbers are typically measured in the millions.

Because Colorado's landlocked salmon do not successfully reproduce at rates high enough to sustain themselves, the manual collection of eggs is critical for their survival. Each year, crews collect the eggs during the fall spawning season. The eggs are then transported to CPW's Glenwood Springs fish hatchery where they are hatched, raised, then stocked into the various reservoirs the following spring when they are 1 to 2 inches long.

CPW biologist Jon Ewert, who heads up the egg collection operation in Grand County, blamed the sharp decline at Lake Granby on multiple factors, including predatory lake trout, increasing populations of mysis shrimp and parasitic gill lice.

According to Ewert, the high water level in Lake Granby creates ideal conditions for a substantial increase in mysis shrimp numbers, which compete with kokanee for plankton, their natural food. A similar phenomenon occurs at Dillon Reservoir in Summit County and is blamed for stunting fish growth there.

Lake Granby faces the additional issue of predation from a dense population of ravenous lake trout, which can decimate kokanee numbers. Blue Mesa Reservoir has already experienced such an impact, with a kokanee population that once peaked at more than 1 million fish diminished to fewer than 280,000 as a result of the voracious lake trout introduced to the impoundment. Blue Mesa also saw a decline in kokanee egg collection this year, biologists said.

The news is not all bad on the salmon front, however, as the relatively new kokanee fishery at Wolford Mountain Reservoir stepped up to make up for the decline at Lake Granby. Wolford produced 1.78 million eggs, enough to support Lake Granby as well.

"Wolford was the great overachiever, producing almost 18 times the number of eggs that we need to restock it," Ewert said. "As a result, we will use the excess eggs from Wolford to shore up Lake Granby's kokanee population."

Williams Fork Reservoir produced enough eggs to sustain itself, but Wolford remains the only Middle Park reservoir without lake trout, mysis shrimp or gill lice.

"And we absolutely need to keep it that way," Ewert said.

Scott Willoughby: [email protected] or twitter.com/swilloughby
 

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How did they clean the nutrients out of Granby?
3 lakes water and sanitation brought in sewer lines around the lakes to the shore front homes that used to have leach fields.
Fraser Valley through winter park added Sanitation plants that cleaned up the water in the river that gets pumped up out of Windy gap into Granby.

With the upcoming Windy gap firming project that will fill the new Chimney Hollow Res. west of Carter Lake, we may not see Lake Granby full (like it is now) in the future. Water levels at Granby change the dynamics of the lake and the Kokanee's success rates the lake level is also determined by the snow pack, right now we are getting lots of Snow.

Willoughby over sensationalizing an old story... Comparing what's going on now to the hey day of the 80s is Apples to Oranges.
Those Lake Trout that we love to catch are just Voracious!!!
Good thing these guys don't write about Saltwater, the oceans full of Voracious monsters,lol.
Luckily the Kokanee eggs are no longer all in 1 or 2 baskets, we have multiple new very productive egg supply areas now.
 

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result of the voracious lake trout introduced to the impoundment, fucking things been in there for 40+ years idiots! perch are the ones the bozos should be looking at, opps standard answer at CPW brainwashing sesssion "the lake trout ate them" works every time.....
 

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These articles always make me want to go beat my head against a brick wall.

When they try to help reduce trophy sized lake trout populations by increasing limits with no trophy protection, We as fisherman are the ones in control. We just need to keep releasing any lake trout over 22". The word has been spread. The vast majority of guys that fish for lake trout are releasing the larger fish despite the regulations. Especially at Granby.

Every balanced fishery needs good population of healthy predators.
Look at Dillon for an example. We all know that for years the fishing opportunity has been stunted kokanne, hammer handle browns, and stocker rainbows.
But recently, brown trout body conditions and #'s are increasing drastically due to to the introduction of fingerling rainbows(thank you jon ewert!) as well as tens of thousands of fingerling arctic char(thanks again).
Now there's lots of little fish paired with a growing population of arctic char that are reaching sizes big enough to prey on little fish. With bigger browns, and 18" plus sized arctic char, Dillon now has predetors and we now just starting to experience some real fishing, along with the best kokanne fishing we have seen in many years. So now we have Arctic char eating kokanee, browns eating kokanee, arctic char eating rainbows, browns eating rsinbows, predators eating each other and there own fry, and most importantly arctic char and browns eating suckers. And because arctic char eat mysis, they are the heroes of the ecosystem. Big fish eating little fish is not a terrible thing. With out lots of little fish, and lots of big fish eating little fish, you have a crappy fishery. Predetorial and non predetorial fish are both good. When you read these newspaper arcticles, its is very evident that the over all thought at the CPW is that lots of lake trout wich is a bad fish eating little fish is "tragic".

"voracious" fish are not bad fish. The CPW views Arctic Char as good fish, and Browns as good fish, yet they do the exact same thing as lake trout do which are bad fish.

Any big fish that can naturally reproduce and eat lots of small fish is a great thing. Especially when you can keep putting more small fish in. Add in the factor that when a big fish is small it controls certain over bearing zoo plankton populations, you have the best fish possible. And this is why lake trout are the best fish in colorados deeper reservoirs. Just like arctic char are the heroes of Dillon. Lake trout are the heroes of every Colorado reservoir they inhabit.

A 22" arctic char, eats a 5" fingerling rainbow has one its throat 2 in its gut. And takes a 4" jerk bait. Voracious?


A 26" brown eats a 10" acrctic char and still tries for a CD11 rap. Voracios? I absolutly love this scenario and was so stoked to see this. Its a great example of 2 naturally reproducing predetors wich are both viewd as good fish keeping themselves in check.

 

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It looks like CPW is cranking up the hype machine and the Denver Post is playing the role of shills also...its all the fault of those ravenous and voracious lake trout...the article is written to sound like Little Red Ridingkoke bumps into the lake trout on the way to Grandmothers Roaring Judy house...

http://www.denverpost.com/willoughby/ci_27179862/granby-kokanee-egg-count-down


SCOTT WILLOUGHBY

Granby kokanee egg count down
By Scott Willoughby
The Denver Post

GRANBY — The deep-water reservoir traditionally serves as one of the top two egg producers for kokanee salmon in Colorado along with Blue Mesa Reservoir in Gunnison County.

Or at least it did.



Colorado Parks and Wildlife crews just wrapped up their yearly kokanee salmon egg collection at Lake Granby and nearby Wolford Mountain and Williams Fork reservoirs, discovering a significant crash in salmon populations and egg production at historically productive Granby. The large lake yielded only 72,000 eggs this year, where egg numbers are typically measured in the millions.

Because Colorado's landlocked salmon do not successfully reproduce at rates high enough to sustain themselves, the manual collection of eggs is critical for their survival. Each year, crews collect the eggs during the fall spawning season. The eggs are then transported to CPW's Glenwood Springs fish hatchery where they are hatched, raised, then stocked into the various reservoirs the following spring when they are 1 to 2 inches long.

CPW biologist Jon Ewert, who heads up the egg collection operation in Grand County, blamed the sharp decline at Lake Granby on multiple factors, including predatory lake trout, increasing populations of mysis shrimp and parasitic gill lice.

According to Ewert, the high water level in Lake Granby creates ideal conditions for a substantial increase in mysis shrimp numbers, which compete with kokanee for plankton, their natural food. A similar phenomenon occurs at Dillon Reservoir in Summit County and is blamed for stunting fish growth there.

Lake Granby faces the additional issue of predation from a dense population of ravenous lake trout, which can decimate kokanee numbers. Blue Mesa Reservoir has already experienced such an impact, with a kokanee population that once peaked at more than 1 million fish diminished to fewer than 280,000 as a result of the voracious lake trout introduced to the impoundment. Blue Mesa also saw a decline in kokanee egg collection this year, biologists said.

The news is not all bad on the salmon front, however, as the relatively new kokanee fishery at Wolford Mountain Reservoir stepped up to make up for the decline at Lake Granby. Wolford produced 1.78 million eggs, enough to support Lake Granby as well.

"Wolford was the great overachiever, producing almost 18 times the number of eggs that we need to restock it," Ewert said. "As a result, we will use the excess eggs from Wolford to shore up Lake Granby's kokanee population."

Williams Fork Reservoir produced enough eggs to sustain itself, but Wolford remains the only Middle Park reservoir without lake trout, mysis shrimp or gill lice.

"And we absolutely need to keep it that way," Ewert said

Scott Willoughby: [email protected] or twitter.com/swilloughby
You got it right Zman...Hyping it up when they Don't need the eggs...Pour little red riding hood...

Blue Mesa's low egg take this year is due to a die off of Kokanee due to Algae problems..
3 record egg takes in a row and then a natural crash?? Not Lake Trout??

Scott forgot to mention we have multiple options for eggs these days and Nighthorse Res. produced close to 5 million eggs from 75k fry at a 1500 acre lake....There is no egg shortage..

Bobco, Blue Mesa's Lake Trout are Voracious they must grow very quickly.

Granby's Lake Trout grow very very slowly and are just Ravenous not Voracious...

I sure do miss Ed Dentry and Charley Meyers, they told both sides of the story and weren't just koolaid drinkers..
 

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I sure do miss Ed Dentry and Charley Meyers, they told both sides of the story and weren't just koolaid drinkers..
BINGO!!!
 

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Dentry loved predetorial fish. Taylor was his favorite place to fish for pike. He stopped in at Gene Taylors back in the day and i spoke with him a few times.. He was a passionate angler no doubt.
I remember a cool article Meyers wrote about lake trout when Steve took him fishing.
Who knows Maybe the author of the article prefers trolling cow bells with leadcore. Maybe high likes standing shoulders to shoulder and snagging kokes. To each his own I guess. But at Granby most everyone that fishes there is fishing for Lakers and wants it to be a trophy lake trout fishery. The article makes it sound like its a tragety that there is a high population of lake trout in granby.. Not the case. It is a Lake Trout destination, people go to Granny from all over for Lakers, not kokanne. Nobody cares about kokannee in Granby. We want lake trout.
 

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I bumped into Marsh several times. I remember one time up at Spinney I sat on a log with him and talked about fishing for about a half hour. Really nice guy!!!!!
 
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