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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be spending a lot of time near Granby in the next 10 years and am interested in getting started ice fishing there. I have a few questions as to what I would need. 1) Are those sleds with the the pop up tops that weigh about 100 lbs (with probably another 100 lbs of gear including an auger) fairly easy to pull out on the lake or do I need a snowmobile to make that work? (I'm 62) 2) How thick does the ice get in winter? 3) Is the fishing mostly for Lake Trout?

Thanks in advance
 

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I'm going to be spending a lot of time near Granby in the next 10 years and am interested in getting started ice fishing there. I have a few questions as to what I would need. 1) Are those sleds with the the pop up tops that weigh about 100 lbs (with probably another 100 lbs of gear including an auger) fairly easy to pull out on the lake or do I need a snowmobile to make that work? (I'm 62) 2) How thick does the ice get in winter? 3) Is the fishing mostly for Lake Trout?

Thanks in advance
1) I think you answered your own question. No they are not easy to pull by hand, specifically if there is a lot of snow on the ground. It is very helpful to have a snowmobile or something with a motor to pull it for you. You can still make it work without a snowmobile, but you'll definitely break a sweat.

2) Ice verys per year. Usually by the end of March the ice is about 20" thinck.

3) The most targeted fish in granby is the lake trout, but the lake also has kokanee, rainbow trout and brown trout.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, that's helpful. The snowmobile part really adds to the complications but I suspected that was true.
 

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You don't necessarily need a flip over shack though. You can buy a sled and a popup hub shack it will make you much more mobile without having to purchase a snowmobile.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll look into that setup. If I pull a sled on top of someone's previous snowmobile tracks to avoid plowing through snow, is that a reasonable idea to make it work?
 

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I pulled a clam one man flip over through a foot of fresh snow a few weeks back. It was 3/4 mile each way. Way out was not too bad because the prospect of fish, but the way back was pretty miserable. I won't do that again any time soon. If theres more than 6 or so inches on top of the ice, I'm fishing within 1/4 mile of where I access the water. Also I am 28, not 62.

The other sled I use to pull my hub style shelter is a lot lighter. I'd recommend that if you think you'll be dragging long distances. The Flip over style are really nice though, if you want to use a shelter but also move a lot. Have not fished Granby but I assume it gets a lot of wind. Hub style shelters can definitely stand up to wind when properly anchored, but they are pretty hard to set up by yourself if its super windy.

I know this doesn't give a definitive answer, but hopefully it at least gives you some personal experience to think from.
 

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I'm close in age and still pull by hand. this limits your range but still very fishable. Atv r good until deep snow. Following tracks help. I find closer areas known to catch fish. Most are friendly but a bit personel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
All are really helpful answers, I really don't want to get the snowmobile/ATV/trailer and deal with maintaining it/storage and all that. So I thought I need some advice before I take the plunge. I'm perfectly fine with not getting too far off the beaten tracks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Weight is obviously the issue, I thought a power auger was a necessity. But if I'm not drilling more than a few holes per trip, is a hand auger reasonable to consider? Or would that be a big mistake? I'm not bringing this up trying to save money, just wondering if reducing weight is more important.
 

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Again I have not iced Granby, but from what I hear, it is a lake where you would not want to use anything less than an 8 inch auger. 8 inch power drill combos do not work as well, especially going through 20 inch ice. If you are going the hand auger or drill auger route, I would definitely use a 6 inch, which may put you at risk for the occasional fish that won't fit through (on Granby).

On a side note, I just used my dad's power auger (propane) on a 4 day ice fishing trip in Northern MN 2 weeks ago, and it was awesome! The ice was 20+ inches and the motor was constantly getting very close to the ice surface. Can't imagine using my 8 inch hand auger on that stuff. It also sucks to not move as much as you want to because you don't wanna hand drill holes. If you can afford a power auger, and are going to be primarily fishing granby, I'd say don't let the weight scare you away. They aren't that heavy. Just bring 6 less beers when you go.
 

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I use an 8" nils powered by a milwaukee 2704 and have absolutely zero problems punching holes. I had it at Granby last weekend and it ate ice alive. I left my 10" jiffy pro 4 at home and will be doing so again this weekend.
 

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Last weekend at granby ice was 10 inches and I drilled a a little over 40 holes. When I tested the battery the day after it said it was at 75% capacity. From what I've seen on youtube and reviews you can expect about 1000 inches of ice with the 2704 and a 5ah battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
6 less beers is a lot! The drill method sounds interesting, again a good tip, I wouldn't have thought of going that route. Any suggestions on which auger to pair with it? Is the Nils beter than others?
 

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There is a big tournament there this weekend, hundreds of people will be ice fishing the lake and it's a good opportunity to talk to people and get ideas and opinions about fishing in this area. Budget Tackle in Granby is a good shop to get info also. I ice the lake often and am always on foot with a hand auger. For me mobility is more of an issue than drilling ice for the most part due to snow or slush on the lake. There is a lot of good fishing within a 1/4 mile walk once you get to k ow the lake.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the info, I was aware of the yearly tournament but didn't know it was this weekend. I'll be out there, snooping around. :)

I have been to Budget Tackle.....summertime advice was good.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Can anyone provide some help with what weight of line I should use and what type of jig for lake trout? Any preferred colors? I have heard a lot about using sucker meat on the jig, what size of piece works best?

I'm trying to get a jumpstart on the learning curve :)
 

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For line you will get different opinions. My experience is that a 15-20# braid/superline with a 5' 10-20# flouro leader works best. I wouldn't use any sort of bright colored line as lakers are very keen on that. Thats the reason you use a flouro leader to avoid any line visibility at all. In CO lakers live in extremely clear water and they visibility is good. As for jigs and sucker meat, the go to is a 3-4" white tube jig with a piece of sucker meet about the size of your thumb nail. Some go bigger, some go smaller.
 
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