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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just got back from a 3 day trip on the Green. Weather conditions were pretty much like any other year. Wind, sun, clouds, snow, a little of everything. Flows were right around 1750CFS. Not a bad flow. Last year was 9000 CFS, so this was a real treat. The 1750 flow covered up many of the bumper rocks in the lower stretches, making for easier rowing. Air temps during the day were 38*-55*. Pretty much what is expected. Bug life was right on, Baetis coming of around 11:00-3:00 with midge hatches throughout the day.

Only thing missing? The fish. Normally, the river is an aquarium. Fish can be seen all up and down the 7 mile float. Not this trip. I bet my boat saw 10 fish cruising during the 3 days. Of course we did see some mouths, but maybe 10% of what we normally see. And any boat in the area were going after what was rising. No real scum line to speak of. Probably 90% of fish spotted were in the last 2-miles. Two of the 3 days the guides were running the B section rather than the A section. Point being, the catching flat out sucked. I think my boat caught 6 fish. My youngest hooked 3, my oldest got 2 and I got 1 fish. All but 1 were stocker Rainbows. Roughly 12" , but they were very dark in color. Some different strain? This was not the traditional Green River experience. That said, we still had a great time. Catching is just gravy on top. Just always fun to be with friends.

Anyway, I bring this to the forum not to *****, but rather find out if others have had the same lack of success? Was the fishing conditions due to the long term 9000 CFS flows last year? Did that flush out the bug life, thus moving the fish further down to section B? I heard that the flows fluctuated greatly this week, 1700 cfs during the day. Right around dark, dropped to 800 cfs for a couple hours, them 3000 cfs till sun up. Not sure why, but perhaps the fluctuation stressed the fish to the point that they split for deep water in the middle of the river. I have zero idea why the fishing was so slow. Any theories?

***edit*** I think I got the fluctuation wrong. 1700 during the day, 2500-3000 around 6:00pm till 10:00pm then drop to 800 till 4:00 am or so
 

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I haven't fished the Green in many years. IMO, I doubt that last years increased flows had any impact. We saw run off here peaking at 12,000 with very high sustained flows for most of the summer and winter and the fishing has been normal to date. Actually low flows now :(

As to the low fish numbers that is strange. Green is a good fishery and from your report it would make people think otherwise. The fluctuations in water can play havoc(as you know), especially when the frequency is increased. If your flow numbers are correct, then the river is in a state of flux more than 50% of the time. Add in no shoulder flows and wow. I would have been looking for deep water holes where fish didn't have to relocate multiple times in 24hrs. Interesting to say the least. Maybe someone else will chime in with more direct knowledge.

Still sounds like a great trip. If the numbers of fish was the worst part, sounds like a very successful outing! (Just a bit jealous here BTW). lol
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I haven't fished the Green in many years. IMO, I doubt that last years increased flows had any impact. We saw run off here peaking at 12,000 with very high sustained flows for most of the summer and winter and the fishing has been normal to date. Actually low flows now :(

As to the low fish numbers that is strange. Green is a good fishery and from your report it would make people think otherwise. The fluctuations in water can play havoc(as you know), especially when the frequency is increased. If your flow numbers are correct, then the river is in a state of flux more than 50% of the time. Add in no shoulder flows and wow. I would have been looking for deep water holes where fish didn't have to relocate multiple times in 24hrs. Interesting to say the least. Maybe someone else will chime in with more direct knowledge.

Still sounds like a great trip. If the numbers of fish was the worst part, sounds like a very successful outing! (Just a bit jealous here BTW). lol
Looking back at things, that is exactly what I should have been doing. Looking for them in deep water. I was rowing my boys and with the wind, it was hard enough to get them on good drifts. Lengthening their leaders was the last thing on my mind. LOL.
 

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The fish should be use to the fluctuations in water levels. Typically pattern of change day vs night, I believe. I know unless you fish the water daily like the guides fishing from the boat can be challenging, in my experience. Why usually we use the boat as a shuttle vehicle to next wade location. That's where we catch all the fish. Easier to change setup, etc. Fished it last November, I know things have changed, but it was absolutely fantastic, especially down by Little hole. Hands down best fishing on the Green I've had. Still day dream of the trip at work....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One bit of info I heard was that the water is still coming from the bottom of the dam. Normally the water is drawn from the middle of the dam by April 1st. This year they were having some issues and couldn't begin drawing from a higher point, thus the bug life was down and the fish were deeper. Not sure how accurate this is but is is a theory I heard from a local. Interesting for sure.
 

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Getting used to fluctuations is true but the numbers given account for 275% change daily. It's not that the water level is changing, but the rate and frequency. Without shoulder flows this can lead to difficult fishing. Shorten feeding times as they need to relocate and adjust. I have seen fish shut down with <10% change. Is this the problem? Who knows. Just a factor worth considering.

Bottom of the dam with ice off? Hmmmm. Spring mixing. Ice on and I can guarantee 4 degree C discharge. Ice off and I'd have to put the thermometer in it. Bug life spot on. I'll rule out any nitrogen saturation as this would have hit a few different forums. Could be that you just floated over all the good holds. LOL. I've floated a stretch of river near me in early spring. Fishing was real slow in the boat but when we stopped and hit holes from the bank we tore them up. Whether it was being able to hit the prime parts of the hole without the boat shadow or just spending a bit more time in one spot; I don't know. Anyhow, trying to figure out slow fishing from the computer and not being there is about as absurd as trying to write a post while on the river.

Good luck this year!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Getting used to fluctuations is true but the numbers given account for 275% change daily. It's not that the water level is changing, but the rate and frequency. Without shoulder flows this can lead to difficult fishing. Shorten feeding times as they need to relocate and adjust. I have seen fish shut down with <10% change. Is this the problem? Who knows. Just a factor worth considering.

Bottom of the dam with ice off? Hmmmm. Spring mixing. Ice on and I can guarantee 4 degree C discharge. Ice off and I'd have to put the thermometer in it. Bug life spot on. I'll rule out any nitrogen saturation as this would have hit a few different forums. Could be that you just floated over all the good holds. LOL. I've floated a stretch of river near me in early spring. Fishing was real slow in the boat but when we stopped and hit holes from the bank we tore them up. Whether it was being able to hit the prime parts of the hole without the boat shadow or just spending a bit more time in one spot; I don't know. Anyhow, trying to figure out slow fishing from the computer and not being there is about as absurd as trying to write a post while on the river.

Good luck this year!
Good stuff and agree. Must be out to actually catch. Wish I was there now. Slow fishing or not, way better than what I'm currently doing.
 

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Getting used to fluctuations is true but the numbers given account for 275% change daily. It's not that the water level is changing, but the rate and frequency. Without shoulder flows this can lead to difficult fishing. Shorten feeding times as they need to relocate and adjust. I have seen fish shut down with <10% change. Is this the problem? Who knows. Just a factor worth considering.

Bottom of the dam with ice off? Hmmmm. Spring mixing. Ice on and I can guarantee 4 degree C discharge. Ice off and I'd have to put the thermometer in it. Bug life spot on. I'll rule out any nitrogen saturation as this would have hit a few different forums. Could be that you just floated over all the good holds. LOL. I've floated a stretch of river near me in early spring. Fishing was real slow in the boat but when we stopped and hit holes from the bank we tore them up. Whether it was being able to hit the prime parts of the hole without the boat shadow or just spending a bit more time in one spot; I don't know. Anyhow, trying to figure out slow fishing from the computer and not being there is about as absurd as trying to write a post while on the river.

Good luck this year!

^^^^well said. Much more informative than I could ever come up with. But again hitting the runs from the banks is much more productive than from the boat. If dialed in fishing from boat can be solid but more often than not have one drift to get the fly into the fishes zone. Even if fish aren't feeding wade fishing gives a guy or girl infinite opportunities to present the fly for the taking. Its like holding a bowl of M&Ms in front of somebody who doesn't want them. Eventually they'll cave and dig into the bowl....
 

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Have to agree with the last couple of posts. I have floated the A and B sections of the Green with my pontoon. Float and stop - wade the bank and then float on to the next area. Then again I have never floated it with a guide in a boat so not sure I would do well if just floating straight through without stopping and doing some wading. Only one chance at a bank or whatever just doesn't give you the same opportunities that stopping and wading do. But then, what do I know. I have only floated the Green once and that was after Labor Day and the few drift boats that my partner and I encountered seemed to be stopping quite a bit also.
 

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The Green must be a wide river to have flows like that? 3000 CFS on the Ark will kill you.
 

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With 14,000 fish per mile, the fish were there. It sounds like there were plenty of bugs out too, but doesn't sound like many fish were keyed in on top. Hard to tell why the fishing was slow. Could be that there was so much food, the fish were gorging themselves early, or being super selective. Bummer, cuz this should be prime time up there right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
With 14,000 fish per mile, the fish were there. It sounds like there were plenty of bugs out too, but doesn't sound like many fish were keyed in on top. Hard to tell why the fishing was slow. Could be that there was so much food, the fish were gorging themselves early, or being super selective. Bummer, cuz this should be prime time up there right now.
Has been for the last 18 years. The biggest thing I'm taking from everything I've heard was that the water was still coming from the bottom. They usually begin drawing from the middle the 1st of April. This year the dam wasn't working properly and the flows continued to com from the bottom. Thus the fish were in the middle of the river, in the real deep stretches. I guess the bugs don't really get going till the water warms up a bit. As stated before, the bugs were there, just not in the normal numbers. I should have run deeper, but the thought of my boys casting 12'+ leaders makes me a bit squeamish. LOL

The Green must be a wide river to have flows like that? 3000 CFS on the Ark will kill you.
Last year it was at 9000 cfs. That was crazy big. Actually washed everything out.
 

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Pete the river is very deep in a lot of spots for it's width so it can handle 3k pretty well but I prefer 850!

The Great Green is a tricky river and the A section even though well stocked has an elite and educated pack of trout.

When the flows are up and the fish are down I will always default to deep dredging with a 14 scud and two small nymph patterns (this time of year one is always a Baetis emerger) trailing behind the scud. You have to fish in the deepest fastest seams with a ton of weight but the fish really stack down there.

Find big holes with fast deep seems with a good eddy and ride it back up and run the same slot multiple times.

I am headed that way in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Pete the river is very deep in a lot of spots for it's width so it can handle 3k pretty well but I prefer 850!

The Great Green is a tricky river and the A section even though well stocked has an elite and educated pack of trout.

When the flows are up and the fish are down I will always default to deep dredging with a 14 scud and two small nymph patterns (this time of year one is always a Baetis emerger) trailing behind the scud. You have to fish in the deepest fastest seams with a ton of weight but the fish really stack down there.

Find big holes with fast deep seems with a good eddy and ride it back up and run the same slot multiple times.

I am headed that way in a few weeks.
Yep. That sounds about right. The few fish the boys did catch were in the deeper runs. Should have stayed there. Good luck to you on your trip. Regardless of the catching, the float is always beautiful and fun.
 
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