Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I went and bought the Clam 2000 shelter yesterday. I've read many of the past posts about anchoring it, but am still having a hard time figuring out a good method. Here is the problem I see...no gromets to attach anything to. After seeing that most stores are now out of ice anchors, I was planning to buy lag eye screws to use, then attach a rope to them and the grommets based on what some of the previous posters had said. HOwever, after opening and putting it up today at home, I don't see where you would attach any rope to. I know some have said they just rest the shelter against their screws, but I'd worry it would raise up some in the wind. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
We take a cordless drill and some six inch lags with large washers, we just sink the lags through the sled portion and keep our feet on the frame when the wind really picks up. Never had any problems, even in heavy winds
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I was up at georgetown yesterday and the wind kicked up which I wasn't ready for and all I had was a ratchet tie down so I took my gas auger and drilled it into the ice then used the ratchet tie down and looped it around the auger and it held us there.

Shorty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
I have seen a lot of ideas on here and I have also tried many. The best thing I have found was using ice climbers spikes(screws) that are unrated ( as the rated ones are expensive). You may be able to search the internet for them. McGuckins in Boulder sold them awhile back, not sure if they still do. These are fantastic as they go in fast and do not require bringing a drill to put them in and take them out. What we did was in the inside of our hut simply buy a drill bit the same diameter and find the most solid place  in the corners to drill and make holes for your ice screws. I have used this method for many, many years and have never had any problems as I have a Shappell 3000 hut. The screws will go in solid to the floor and the wind cannot lift the hut up on any side. I have seen many comments on here for anchoring, but feel this is the simplest and best method available. Finding the ice screws is the hardest part for most people.

Good Luck...

RW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
On my clam, I also use climbing ice anchors, try to find ones that are self cleaning (the ice comes up through the center) I drilled four holes through the plastic shell, one in each corner and then screwed in a eyelet/bolt to the outside. I then used some metal wire for tie offs to the achors. I've been up at Golden Gate on the wind blown bare ice and had the wind blow so hard it nearly picked up the house off the ice but the achors and the wire held it in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I dont like the idea of drilling any holes thru the bottom of my sled so I drilled a hole on each side of the sled tub up on the vertical area and strung a foot long piece of cord with a flat washer and a knot on the inside- with a knot on the outside. then I use 4 or 5" lag eye-screws in the ice after a pilot hole has been drilled. Ive had no problems with this set-up-- and nothing in the tub gets wet from any slush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
You might take a couple pieces of rebar
(12-14 inches or so)and some rope. Drill a couple of holes and drop the rebar in when you pull the rope tight the rebar sits tight under the ice. attach to your sled however you want.
To get loose, just work the rebar to the side and it'll come out. and if that dosen't work just cut the rope. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,666 Posts
i would definetely try to get the rebar out. im thinking snow covered, snowmobile,four wheeler,rebar sticking out, probably not a good thing. or pound it all the way down. that might ruin your day if it's sticking up..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Good ideas. I was wondering why the ice screws i've found online were so expensive. I'll have to try one of these suggestions.

On another note, since someone mentioned getting slush on the inside, what do you do with the slush you clear from your holes during the day (or don't they freeze up like they would outside).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
The expensive ones are the rated ones they use for ice climbing- I think they are rated for holding strength and that is why they are so expensive. I had a hard time finding some for friends a couple years ago that were non rated. You might look at McGuckins/Boulder to see if they have a website and ask if they carry non rated ones still. They used to sell them there 2 years ago.

On the slush issue- once you set up your hut usually it stays warm enough they don't freeze over when you are fishing inside plus most people use small heaters inside when it is cold out. We drill our holes first then clear slush off to sides, set hut up over holes, anchor hut down and take remaining outside slush and build up on outside bottom edges of hut to stabilize it in case really bad winds come up. It makes a strong foundation for the bottom and usually slightly refreezes over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
jetx said:
Drill a couple of holes and drop the rebar in when you pull the rope tight the rebar sits tight under the ice. 
I think what jetx is doing is putting the rebar down through the hole to the bottom of the ice (underneath). If you cut the rope, the rebar falls to the bottom of the lake. We have done this a few times with a piece of 2x4. Only problem is you have an open hole behind, or on the side of you house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Thanx Johnny O thats xactly what I meant. Still...You could use that hole for your fishfinder or as another fishing hole to try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
When I used one of the type shelters like you have, I had very good luck by screwing an eye-lag bolt into the ice on either side of the hut, outside the door, then running a ratchet strap across the floor between them. I've been in windstorms where the frame bent, other guys huts were getting blown apart, and have never had any problems.

The one thing I liked about this system was the ability to quickly strap it down before erecting the frame in the wind. Otherwise, with the screws inside the hut, you have to flop around in there under the tent, in each corner, in the wind, before you can erect the frame.

Places like Uncle Miltys and other good fishing stores sell eye-lags especially for that. Very inexpensive, and 1/4 of the thread is cut out from top to bottom to provide a cutting edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
We initially set our hut up after we drill our holes, then move it into place and anchor it down with the ice screws.  So no, we don't screw it down then set it up. Even if you strap it down if there is wind it would still flop around while setting it up I suspect. Don't know of any huts unless they are plywood that would not flop around in the wind while being set up.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top