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going up to a mountain lake about 12,000 feet. its a 5.5 mile hike. i read there are brook trout in there. its a small lake, and about 35 feet deep. Ive never been to these high mountain lakes, does any one have any advice? I was going to try some flys w/ a bubble. what kinda flys should i use?
 

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it deppends on what the forage base of the lake is if it has the fresh water shrip/scuds then a small brown/light tan nymph fished deep sould work good. at 12000' you might find more cutts then brookies but if it does have brookies they may be starting to spawn so i would look to any inlets

if you wanted to fish a dry i have been told an orange asher it a great dry for high mountain lakes
 
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Slayer is the best one to ask, but start with a small, shiny spinner, such as a kastmaster, TB, or mepps. We did a long hike up to Gilpin lake, and the brook trout, which were BIG, wanted marshmallows! Just experiment. The fish will probably not have near as much pressure as most lakes, so they may take a lot of things.
 

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Howdy!
Fishing tips for high mountain lakes would be a forte of mine so I had to chime in. High mountain brookies can be caught with great consistency depending on their mood with a few things in your bag. My favorite lures woulb be a black body with yellow dots and gold blade panther martin this time of year and there is no sin in a rooster tail for that matter either. Lures throw well in wind and they fish deeper then does most fly patterns. This will work well and I would pinch down your barbs so you don't mess up the fish to bad as you might catch more fish then you know what to do with. For fly patterns a few favorites of mine are royal coachmen with most of the wings trimmed off in about a size 14. An intimidator in a 14 or 16 and an Elk Hair Caddis or Royal Wolf in a 14 for top water action. Most days, most brookies are really willing to attack just about anything, but the panther martin is my "no longer" secret weapon for catching fish when they are slugish or hard to intice. The inlet and outlet both normally prove worthy. Also any fallen logs or other structure can hide a good fish or 3. A shallow flat at the inlet side where silt has filled in the first part of the lake warms up nice first and so fish it early and late as the fish move shallow to feed. In the middle of the day, I like to fish the seam between the deep and shallow water and structure as fish are looking for an easy meal. Hope this helps and post pics when you get back. I miss them brookies the most!
Craig
 
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