Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need some help. I have a baitcaster that collects dust ( I know it's a SIN!!) and it kills me to see the rod and reel get abused year after year. I don't care how many rats-nest I get I am determined to figure it out.

Any help will be greatly thankful! Please help me end years of abuse to a good rod and reel. I will keep you posted with updates on how things are going. I plan to take it with me on every fishing journey along with plenty of line.

What is the best line to use?
How do you use flipping?
How to you prevent rats-nest?
How do you put line on a baitcaster?
Is there a web site, book, or video that is helpful?

Thank You for your help.

In Him,
ForgivenFisherman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
ForgivenFisherman I to am new to the world of baitcasters but this has worked for me. Keep the brake tight. This will hurt your casting distance but it will prevent backlash. Also using heavier lures helps. Just cast with the brake tight and slowly loosen it as you get more comfortable. In my case this is when I get cocky and say I have it figured out and then one cast and woosh birds nest city.

The best line depends on the fishing situation. I have heard that line with a wide diamiter won't cut into the reel as easily so you have less backlash.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I agree with Hatch for the most part, though not sure how old your reel is. Some have a lever to control the spool speed on the left hand side (controlled by magnets). Others have knobs you can tighten on the right by the spool (brake by tension). Still some, have plastic brakes located on the spool itself (don't remove them unless you know what you are doing). Either way, when starting, the more brake means less backlash.

Essentially, the object of casting it is the spool must never travel faster than the thing on the end of your line. You can slow the spool with brakes or your thumb. The spool should never turn after casting the lure/bait into the water. When you're starting out, also try not to cast into the wind (the wind will slow the travel of your lure/bait causing backlash).

Practice and use is the key. Pick up a 5/8 ounce plug to practice with. Line preference is whatever you want. If you have a flipping lever on your reel, essentially, all it does is lock the spool (you can also use your thumb). Spool the line on tight so if you hook a big fish, the line doesn't dig into the spool (because your drag is set).

Practice, practice, practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
There are quite a few prior posts on the subject. Just use the search button and type in baitcasters

Cheers,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the Brake. I will use it this week when I practice on the little pond I have.

How tight is to tight for line on the spool?
What are the differences between spinning set-up and baitcasting setups, besides that they look different?
Is one better for casting lure, live bait etc....?

Thanks Hatchmaster, Mr. Ed, work2fish.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts


It's all in the thumb.

I learned by doing just as the others have posted. Use alot of brake to start. A heavy object to cast. Additionally, I try to imagine "pushing" the lure out instead of whipping it out on the cast. I can't really explain it better but you want a gradual build up of speed and not a explosive build up. This is most important in my humble opinion,,,,use your THUMB to gradually slow the lure until the lure hits the water and you stop the spool from turning.  I think heavier line helps when it comes to untangling the nest you WILL create. Just my opinion and what has worked for me. I'm no Roland or Bill,,,, but it worked for me.
 

·
OG LOKE
Joined
·
18,957 Posts
laker taker said:


It's all in the thumb.

I learned by doing just as the others have posted. Use alot of brake to start. A heavy object to cast. Additionally, I try to imagine "pushing" the lure out instead of whipping it out on the cast. I can't really explain it better but you want a gradual build up of speed and not a explosive build up. This is most important in my humble opinion,,,,use your THUMB to gradually slow the lure until the lure hits the water and you stop the spool from turning.  I think heavier line helps when it comes to untangling the nest you WILL create. Just my opinion and what has worked for me. I'm no Roland or Bill,,,, but it worked for me.


MAN YOU HIT IT ON THE NAIL!!!

just as he said...its hard to explain...

what i do is practice pitchin' and flippin' in my office at home...put on a fairly heavy jig...say 3'8oz....put a bowl out and practice letting out some line to it...you will be amazed how accurate you will become after a few weeks of doing this...i can place a bait within a 2inch square length eveytime...just ask waterwolves :)
Also with a baitcaster...depending on what type of reel you have left hand or right hand retrieve...get used to pitchin' and flippin' with BOTH HANDS...this could save you from losing fish as the lure hits the water due to you having to switch hands to re-engage the reel...

give it a try man! pm me if you have any more questions ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
I learned to flip standing in the back of my pick up truck
and pitching to a hula hoop in my front yard. Simulates being on a boat at higher than water level.
I like the reels that have a flipping switch so you don't have to crank the reel handle to get the bail to engage.
Like the Fonz said, most everything is contolled by your thumb. When you are first starting out stay away from
using light lures or casting into the wind. This will only discourage you. I've also find it better to cast side arm vs overcast. Flipping is probably my favorite was of fishing for bass because you can do the B.A.S.S. method of setting the hook. Stick with it, you'll be a pro in no time.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top