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I started this topic on WSA out of Grand Junction and the consensus for Western Colorado was an 18' aluminum multi-species with a 150 engine.
How about opinions for all of Colorado? ( I was the odd-ball, like my 17' Walleye Skeeter with 115 mercury 2plus2)
 

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Depends where you are fishing and what you are fishing for.

I think a good drift boat is best if your fishing any river here in Colorado.

Best all around I would say a 16'-18' wide bottom Canoe, they are very stable you can add a motor to them, you can carry them down to lakes with no boat ramps. The wife and Kid fit in it very well with you.


But its all prefrence, my dad would say a 26' pontoon.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Clarification: IDEAL COLORADO FISHING BOAT; any species in Colorado and small lakes to large reservoirs. To help those looking for their first boat avoid many mistakes, like buying a 10' flat bottom boat for Blue Mesa, or like I did, buying a general family boat with reclining seats, then tearing out and building casting decks to make it into a fishing boat. Advantages of specific combinations and which accessories to add. Example-my Skeeter has the Mercury 115 4 cylinder, very economical, then runs only on 2 cylinders under 1800 rpm, lets it troll under 1 mph. Others prefer kickers, electric autopilot for trolling etc. Downriggers, how many, what brand? tips, tips, tips!
 
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I disagree with the deep V being a must. I have a shallow V and have gotten into places where folks with a deep V couldn't (and caught fish - like at Chatfield). Have also been comfortable in some pretty rough water in it.

Depends on where you go. I like my boat in certain lakes (19 foot bass boat), would like to have a boat like Talo's or Moby's in other lakes.

Then again, I like the Blue Mesa ranger patrol boat - a 20 foot Boston Whaler with twin Merc 115's. A livewell in front of the console and I'd be flyin' in front of everyone else in a tournament.
 

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To be safe on Colorado`s larger water impoundments I highly recommend a deep-V. Almost every year we hear of some poor souls that did`nt make it out of 11 Mile, Spinney or Grandby. When the weather comes up as it often does in Colorado, a flatter bottomed boat or one with little free board will capsize or take on too much water. I fish out of a 17` open , deep V aluminum boat. I consider this a minimum safe requirement. I`ve had times when even this seemed a bit shaky. I can fish virtually anywhere with safety and confidence. Fish out of a smaller boat on large impoundments and I personally think you could be pushing the envelope.
 

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I'm with Mr. Ed. I like my shallow V bottom as well. When that water starts getting rough I can open it up a bit and glide right over the tops of the waves. and when you want that shallow water, there's no problems.
 
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racer said:
To be safe on Colorado`s larger water impoundments I highly recommend a deep-V
I've fished all of those places including Blue Mesa and Lake Mac out east. Been on the water when most people are off the lake because of rough conditions. Had a situation a couple weeks back were Capthook was with me at a lake and the water was a bit rough. No troubles for us - we were one of two boats out (and it wasn't that bad).

A shallow-V will suit you just fine anywhere in Colorado as long as you don't do the stuff that you aren't supposed to do (anchor the stern, back troll, over-load it, etc.). ANY BOAT (including a deep-V) will capsize if it takes on too much water. In that case, it is usually the operator and not the boat that is the problem.
 

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A full walk-thru windshield is a must. Warm and dry versus cold and wet. It is AMAZING the diff with a full w-shield!
 
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Adding to Slayer's post...I would consider a bimini top a must-have creature comfort as well. In the high mountain lakes, that sun can get bright and the rain can get cold. On the plains, you just plain need to have shade over you in the summer. It's worth the extra cash.
 

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Thanks everyone. I'm looking at buying a bout in late summer or early fall and would and will be asking this question and a few other. I have never boated before so from what I gather here is have some type of V bottom and stay away from a flat bottom john boat if I want to go to the larger lakes.
 
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bassboatjockey said:
Wonder how a bimini top would look on a bass boat? hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Got one - works great! $350 from iBoats.com. Essentially covers the center area and you can stand underneath it. Rear seat gets shade depending on position but front seat is always in the sun. Mine is gray

 

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ePiC said:
Depends where you are fishing and what you are fishing for.

I think a good drift boat is best if your fishing any river here in Colorado. 

Best all around I would say a 16'-18' wide bottom Canoe, they are very stable you can add a motor to them, you can carry them down to lakes with no boat ramps. The wife and Kid fit in it very well with you. 


But its all prefrence, my dad would say a 26' pontoon.
Epic-  I think alot of people would disagree with you on a drift boat.  The number of rivers and time of year(adequate water flows) are very limited.  In fact HYDE pulled their dealership out of Colorado due to all the warranty related damage to their boats on the Roaring Fork alone.  Those Boulder Boat Works dory's are sweet but $$$$.

An inflatable raft is a better all around choice, though you tend to get a bit wet.
 
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Needlesxx said:
Thanks everyone. I'm looking at buying a bout in late summer or early fall and would and will be asking this question and a few other. I have never boated before so from what I gather here is have some type of V bottom and stay away from a flat bottom john boat if I want to go to the larger lakes.
In all honesty, if it's your first boat, here's what I would do if I had to do it all over again...

- About 16 or 17 foot aluminum hull deep or shallow v - you'll be able to take it anywhere and beach it without worrying about wrecking the hull in sand
- Between a 70 or 90 horse outboard - big enough to get you moving, small enough to get you to troll at slower speads on that sized boat
- Bow mounted remote trolling motor - you won't need to constantly have your foot on a pedal when trolling at really slow speads
- Full Front Windshield
- At minimum bimini top, full enclosure option for rainy days
- At minimum one live well
- EZ-Loader trailer as opposed to one with rollers
- Isolated battery from motor to run accessories (if you troll a lot, the alternator on your motor will not be able to keep up while you run other accessories like a live well, radio, gps, fish finder, etc.)
- Everything else is an accessory that you can ad on later (down rigger, net, rod holders, etc)

Don't forget to add in the price (or negotiate in the price) the required equipment - paddle, life jackets, throwable flotation device, fire extinguisher, etc.
 

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Thanks Mr. Ed.

Those are a lot of the questions that I would have been asking. Just some food for thought if anyone late this summer has a boat like what Mr. Ed has listed I just might be interested in it. Me and the wife have been reading and talking and that sounds about what we want.
 

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I second the motion on the Bimini Top. Without it I would have litterally fried out on the water during the summer. It`s a nice thing to get under during a shower as well.

I have a two stroke 35 H.P. `Big Johnson` that does well enough across the water and trolls all day long with great fuel economy................. that being said I`d not be opposed to a 50 or so. Let your budget make your decision.

Be patient while shopping and choose something you really want..............
& don`t settle for a sales pitch . ::)
 

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I don't think that you can pick one boat out as perfect for Colorado. It really
depends on where you spend most of your time. I have a 14' aluminum V-hull
with a small outboard and trolling motor. It does very well on most lakes, but
I have been plenty nervous on Granby with white caps. I can hand launch it
if necessary and most docks are no problem, no matter what the level of the
lake is.
 

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Well, since I own one ;), I think aluminum walleye boats are perfect for Colorado. In all seriousness, though, it really depends on where and how you want to fish! I like the high sides of a walleye boat to protect you from the coooold water and waves when the wind picks up and aluminum for banging against the rocks. I also like the full windshield which allows you to put a full fishing cover up for the nastier weather (like tornados ;)). In general if you plan to fish the mountain lakes, a larger motor also comes in handy as you lose something like 3% HP for every 1000' of elevation above sea level and there are times when you want to get off the lake ASAP. My boat has a casting platform up front which I use for spin casting or flyfishing. Finally, these boats are also nice since they have a lot of room for mounting things such downriggers, rod holders and other stuff you need for trolling and deeper water.

I have never fished from a center console boat, but I see how they could be nice because of the easy way you can get around without navigating around.

Anyway, looks like you've been given some good advice. Now go out there and try out some boats to see what you like!
 

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since i live in colorado now and have for 7 years or so i have come to the conclusion that the ultimate colorado fishing boat is a 40' trawler docked in san diego for those weekend getaways when it is too windy to fish here

fresh ahi tastes sooooooo gooooooood!
 
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