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Studies have shown that a pike's preferred meal is 1/3 his own size. That 40 inch monster in your la

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Discussion Starter #1
Studies have shown that a pike's preferred meal is 1/3 his own size.
That 40 inch monster in your lake is dining on 13 inch walleyes.

Was this an actual study do you think, and is this True or False?
 

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they are able to eat something that size, but the smaller stuff is more available and easier to catch. i have seen 22 inch walleye with a 8 inch walleye down its throat and a 27 inch wiper with a 14inch wallete that it got caught in it's throat and died
 

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Nawanda said:
Studies have shown that a pike's preferred meal is 1/3 his own size.
That 40 inch monster in your lake is dining on 13 inch walleyes.
Few lakes in CO have those combination of predators. Believe most pike are dining on trout in this state.

Nawanda said:
Was this an actual study do you think, and is this True or False?
Yes. Something you copied off the net and placed here.


You being paid by Donald?
 

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I had to say false. Yes, pike are known to eat fish up to 1/3 their size (meaning, length) but I don't think you can say it's their preferred meal. Their preferred meal is whatever they can easily catch, and includes a large range of sizes.
 

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I would be interested to know the researchers methods, and what controls if any were used.

Here is my two ¢... fish eat food.

If they see a meal and it is not too hard to get, they get it. I got my PB pike on a 4" Roboworm. But I have no doubt that a fish will eat huge meals when they can. "Prefer" is a tough call, because fish don't have a great abundance of insight or self awareness (witness betas attacking their own reflection)

I think blanket statements are not great. But I don't want to make a blanket statement about it! "Always" and "never" are like Dave's Insanity hot sauce. A little goes a long way. But pike can -and do- eat some HUGE meals.

Nate Zelinski should chime in on this. He has caught or put clients on more donkey pike than anyone else around.

SS
 

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I caught a 30 inch pike one time at 11 mile that felt really heavy. When I cleaned her she had a 15 inch koke in her belly.

Fresh too.

I gave serious consideration to eating the koke as well.

With that fish in her belly and the tail halfway out her throat she still inhaled my 6 inch jerkbait.

I also caught a pike that had nine rainbows in her belly. Obviously all the rainbows were pretty small. She too was still eating. Both these pike were on the smaller side like 30-32 inches.

I have also caught bigger pike that had some serious bellys on them that I did not keep so I am not sure what was in there.

90% of the pike I have cleaned though have empty stomachs.....
 
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I would think that although they can eat someting that big, it might not be their preferred size of forage.
 

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Course its true, you have to go big, bait of lures, to catch a decent one. I never throw a jerk less than 5", and really thats too small.
 

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http://www.fishingfury.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/130cm_giant_pike.jpg

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2007/1106/20071106__20071107_D12_SP07MEYERS~p1_200.JPG
(caught on a bouface)

this was caught trolling a wedding ring for trout on 6lb.
http://www.mackslure.com/images/Record-Pike.jpg

I got one at 25lbs. on a 4" Roboworm. I know that is not a huge fish, but compared to the size of the pike the worm looked tiny.

We all know big baits get big bites. I sure do! But this idea that only big baits get big bites is just plain false.
The right bait in the right place in the right time is the one that gets the big bite.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
walleye seeker said:
they are able to eat something that size, but the smaller stuff is more available and easier to catch. i have seen 22 inch walleye with a 8 inch walleye down its throat and a 27 inch wiper with a 14inch wallete that it got caught in it's throat and died-----WalleyeSeeker
The most interesting fact brought to my attention, was something I did not really know.

It seems that Walleye, Wipers, and possibly all fish are willing to gobble down the biggest prey that they can get their mouth on.

It's like Fish really can't affort to "Just say No". It's always Yes and YES.

.
 

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We might frame the phenomenon this way; fish eat what is available. They happen to have an extraordinary range of acceptable forage sizes. The dramatic examples of very large forage are most impressive to humans, and therefore are the ones that we remember with the greatest clarity. These are awesome events!

I was fishing a front range lake (that shall remain unidentified) in the 90's and was watching a nice trout (18'' range) cruising and sipping chironomids. This went on for some time. At a point, I saw a flash of movement and looked over just in time to see a HUGE largemouth bass crush the trout. It grabbed it sideways in its jaws like a dog with a bone and bore down hard. Many people do not realize it, but bass have very powerful jaws. The bass turned the trout and swallowed it headfirst and blew a ton of tiny scales out its gills. It was a spine tingling event to witness. I would estimate the bass to be in the 24 - 26" range and in very good condition. State record potential. I started fishing swimbaits real hard after that.

It is still important to realize there are dozens, if not hundreds of smaller meals consumed by predators. We just don't see them.

I think when a lake is experiencing a maximum level of activity, for whatever reason, is when these big meals happen. Fish are not always active. A big meal will not appeal to a lethargic fish. A small meal will likely get ignored by a "hot" fish that is on the warpath.

We have to remember that there are few absolutes in anything.
 

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swimbait said:
We might frame the phenomenon this way; fish eat what is available. They happen to have an extraordinary range of acceptable forage sizes. The dramatic examples of very large forage are most impressive to humans, and therefore are the ones that we remember with the greatest clarity. These are awesome events!

I was fishing a front range lake (that shall remain unidentified) in the 90's and was watching a nice trout (18'' range) cruising and sipping chironomids. This went on for some time. At a point, I saw a flash of movement and looked over just in time to see a HUGE largemouth bass crush the trout. It grabbed it sideways in its jaws like a dog with a bone and bore down hard. Many people do not realize it, but bass have very powerful jaws. The bass turned the trout and swallowed it headfirst and blew a ton of tiny scales out its gills. It was a spine tingling event to witness. I would estimate the bass to be in the 24 - 26" range and in very good condition. State record potential. I started fishing swimbaits real hard after that.

It is still important to realize there are dozens, if not hundreds of smaller meals consumed by predators. We just don't see them.

I think when a lake is experiencing a maximum level of activity, for whatever reason, is when these big meals happen. Fish are not always active. A big meal will not appeal to a lethargic fish. A small meal will likely get ignored by a "hot" fish that is on the warpath.

We have to remember that there are few absolutes in anything.
+1 That's an excellent post
 

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That may not be as helpful as imagined. A three pound trout hangs around longer in there than a half pounder. A half pounder hangs around longer than a fathead minnow.
 

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95% of the pike I have caught their bellys were empty. That's 11 mile pike too not Spinney. I read some where that pike can go a year without eating. Not sure if that's true.......
 

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Nawanda said:
It seems that Walleye, Wipers, and possibly all fish are willing to gobble down the biggest prey that they can get their mouth on.

It's like Fish really can't affort to "Just say No". It's always Yes and YES.

.
Not when it's my lure they see!!!
 
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