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I have never done this, would like to try it. I have 1 1/2" Kastmasters, chrome/pink and chrome/chartreuse to start with. Any tips would help. Do I need smaller spoons with a single hook? I will be fishing in late August. Also I was looking for some 1/16oz Croc spoons and found that no one is USA sells them, only Canada.

Chris
 

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I use to catch them on a 1/6 oz Cripple Herring spoon and Little Tazmanian Devils. You will probably need more weight in August as they go deeper. Bobco is the go to guy for late summer jigging.
 

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I jig for them every year with good success. You will want something with some more weight. The lightest I go 1/3oz crippled herring... but I will only use that if the bite is slow. Kokes seem to prefer the smaller presentation, but as pathway said; they are deep and it is beneficial to have a heavier jig to get down faster. I typically use 1/2oz or 3/4oz jigs and occasionally will go with a 1oz or 1/3oz. Crippled herrings are good, the PK panic is good (but expensive)... the best cost wise is the cabelas "Reel image" and it will get the job done. Green glow, pink, fire tiger and white are all colors I would recommend. Probably the most important thing is to get yourself some corn to tip your hooks. Just like most kokanee fisherman, I use white shoepeg and scent it. My particular scent recipe is a closely guarded secret, but I would recommend getting some krill oil or something fishy to scent your corn with... and marinate it for at least a few days. People use garlic, coffee, whiskey, anise and all sorts of different scents to help entice them to bite. Get a reel with a line counter or some bobber stops to mark out 10 foot sections in your line because knowing your depth is absolutely critical. Use a medium action pole (preferably one with the blank exposed as they like to peck at your jig and it helps you feel those bites.) Also, you should always be able to feel the weight of your jig--particularly on the downstroke as that will be where 90% of your bites happen. Slowly drop down on your jig so that you can still feel it's weight... if you slack line on the downstroke you will not feel them bite. Good luck.
 
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