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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in need of a knife sharpener... Since I got my new filet knife in early April, I've been using the hell out of it and I have a f***ing dull blade that won't possibly filet another fish.

I've been looking at a few, and was wondering if you guys had a preference.

There's the cheap one:




There's the more expensive one:




And there's the classic knife sharpening rod:




Preferences for a fish fileting knife?
 

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What I like is a double or triple sided oil stone. The last one (a steel) will realign the edge on blade that is partially dull, but really won't bring back an edge to a blade that is totally dull. A steel should be used kinda regularly to maintain an edge especially if you're doing a ton of knife work. But once the edge is gone I go right to the stone.
 

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Something like this, JW?



Yep exactly. Only difference is the one's i normally use have like an oil reservoir on the bottom so that as you rotate the stones they go through the oil. Really not necessary tho, just as good to add a lil oil when youre using it. I don't know what kinda price you're seeing 'em for but a lot of the three sided one's are expensive. A double sided would prolly do ya right and cost less..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea, I was hoping for something under $20. The one Andy posted is under $5, and that's even better. ;)

Might not be as good, but right now, the cheaper the better. I have probably one more filet trip before the fish fry, and if I can get my blade sharp for $5, f*** it.... works in the short term... long term, probably the oil stone you suggested.

I've got to feed 14 people fish... I'll probably need the rest of Buck's limit in gills to finish off the supply. (he has 8 in the freezer now... another 12 small ones or 6-8 bigger ones and we're set)

On the menu:

1) Rainbow trout from Grand County
2) Mackinaw from Grand County
3) Bluegills from Denver County
4) Bluegills from Jefferson County
5) Crappie from Denver County

I bet the gills from Jeff Co taste better than the ones from Denver Co. =) LOL
 

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I usually sharpen my filet knife between fish, not between seasons. Good old ceramic rod or a stone. Andy's option occasionally too.
 

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I SUCK at keeping a consistent angle when I sharpen and it tends to mess up my edges. So I use a Gatco. It has a T shaped base that holds the knife at a certain angle. The a rod comes out of the stone's handle and goes into one of several slots on the T. There are several different angle you can select, but it keeps your stone at the smae angle for every stroke. A little more expensive, but even I can't screw it up!

http://www.cabelas.com/product/GATCO8482-Edgemate8482-System-Knife-Sharpener/732414.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Ntk%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dgatco%26x%3D0%26y%3D0%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts&Ntt=gatco&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products
 

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For the amount of fish you are cleaning one of these should work fine
they come with most rapala knifes. If I'm using a good knife I go with your third pic.
 

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I just use a fine stone, and never let the knife get real dull. I just need to touch it up.

Seems much easier than having to build a new edge.
 

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Something like this, JW?

I have that set up and it does great on my knives. Practice a little on getting your angle correct and you'll never use anything other than an Arkansas stone again. I have several of the pull through sharpeners in the kitchen drawer now. Not even close to what a stone can do.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This is the one I bought last night. Not fancy, but gets the job done.



The first 5 or 6 passes were real rough and "grinding". The next 5 or 6 were smoother, but still like nails on a chalkboard. After that, it just goes right through like butter. I tried it out today separating skin from filet on some salmon we caught up in Grand county. This knife wasn't this sharp when I first got it.

And at $5.00, you can't beat the value.

I'll probably get a stone in the future, but this works perfectly for now.
 

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Waterstones. I use them on my chisels. Literally, razor sharp. I call it good when I can shave hairs with it. Knives are a bit tougher on waterstones but there is less material loss in the long run so the knives last longer. I usually use a Rapala knife for skinning fillets and a regular kitchen knife for the rest. Preferably serrated to cut through the ribs easier.
 

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The electric ones like the one in your post work well. I used one in my kitchen for years. Fast and foolproof. The ceramic ones work well but only for a short time for they clog.
 

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I use just a standard sharpening steel (rod) between every fish or two. And about once every 3-4 fillet sessions I'll bust out the Lansky and bring the edge back to its original shape. I've had the same Rapala knife for 15+ years and its still sharper then any knife I've ever seen!



 
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