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Hey guys, just curious if the salmon snag at GM ever got off the ground this year or is that lake knocked out due to gill lice? I have not been up there and I have not seen anyone talk about it either.
 

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Hey guys, just curious if the salmon snag at GM ever got off the ground this year or is that lake knocked out due to gill lice? I have not been up there and I have not seen anyone talk about it either.
There won't be any snagging available for quite some time.. Season before last kokanne stocking was reduced by over half. According to Ewert The idea is to not give the gill lice anymore fish to thrive on. Hopefully reducing the gill lice populations and stronghold. Once the gill lice subsides then it sounds like they plan on stocking it back up with jokes.
 

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There won't be any snagging available for quite some time.. Season before last kokanne stocking was reduced by over half. According to Ewert The idea is to not give the gill lice anymore fish to thrive on. Hopefully reducing the gill lice populations and stronghold. Once the gill lice subsides then it sounds like they plan on stocking it back up with jokes.
As long as cattle graze into the river and lake, the fish will always have worms.
 

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As long as cattle graze into the river and lake, the fish will always have worms.
Sorry, I have to speak up here because this is one of the most extreme cases of absolutely incorrect information to pop up here in a while. I would hate to think that anyone would read that and think that it's true. Gill lice are an aquatic parasitic copepod that don't live any part of their life cycle outside of water. They have no relationship whatsoever with cattle. They're not worms, and not really that wormlike at all. Here's a list of reservoirs, their gill lice status, and the grazing situation (subjectively) in their watersheds:
Wolford - no gill lice, heavily grazed. Williams Fork - heavy gill lice, moderately grazed. Granby - no gill lice, minimally grazed. Clear Creek - heavy gill lice, lightly grazed. Blue Mesa - no gill lice, heavily grazed. Green Mountain - heavy gill lice, moderately grazed at most. There is no relationship between grazing in the watershed and the occurrence of gill lice. What there is a strong relationship with, is the occurrence of gill lice in close proximity to waters that are, or have been, heavily privately stocked.
 

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Jon, if there is a relationship between gill lice and privately stocked waters, does that mean that the stocked fish have come from infested hatcheries?
 

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When I had a bad case of gill lice at my ponds after being stocked by a private hatchery the manager there told me that Gill lice are natural everywhere and when fish get stressed out they are susceptible. The suspicion is that since the private hatcheries may not be 100% clean that they may be spreading the gill lice. My Rainbows are doing fine now but Kokanee are more susceptible to becoming infected with them and have a harder time getting rid of them.
 

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When I had a bad case of gill lice at my ponds after being stocked by a private hatchery the manager there told me that Gill lice are natural everywhere and when fish get stressed out they are susceptible. The suspicion is that since the private hatcheries may not be 100% clean that they may be spreading the gill lice. My Rainbows are doing fine now but Kokanee are more susceptible to becoming infected with them and have a harder time getting rid of them.
That makes sense, just like the pine beetles have always been around and when the pines got stressed from the drought they got a strong foothold. The effects of our drought are going to be felt for a long time.
 

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Tight quarters of hatcheries allows disease to spread quickly, so it is easy for trout to get gill lice. Once in a lake, trout spread out more, so less contact, less likely to spread gill lice. When the gill lice reach Kokes, it spreads faster because Kokes school tighter than trout. Drought force more fish into less water, sort of like a hatchery, so the gill lice can spread more easily.

Think about it like children at school and head lice. Preschool and elementary school the kids all play closely together on smaller play grounds, and lice spread easily. Middle school and high school, kids spread out, have different cliques and do more things than play in the sand box, so lice are less prevalent.
 

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Sorry, I have to speak up here because this is one of the most extreme cases of absolutely incorrect information to pop up here in a while. I would hate to think that anyone would read that and think that it's true. Gill lice are an aquatic parasitic copepod that don't live any part of their life cycle outside of water. They have no relationship whatsoever with cattle. They're not worms, and not really that wormlike at all. Here's a list of reservoirs, their gill lice status, and the grazing situation (subjectively) in their watersheds:
Wolford - no gill lice, heavily grazed. Williams Fork - heavy gill lice, moderately grazed. Granby - no gill lice, minimally grazed. Clear Creek - heavy gill lice, lightly grazed. Blue Mesa - no gill lice, heavily grazed. Green Mountain - heavy gill lice, moderately grazed at most. There is no relationship between grazing in the watershed and the occurrence of gill lice. What there is a strong relationship with, is the occurrence of gill lice in close proximity to waters that are, or have been, heavily privately stocked.
Welp, I'll admit when I'm wrong. And I apologize.

I just figured the gill lice were like worms in cattle ponds, since most of the lakes I seen the lice at had cattle on them.

Carry on.
 

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When the kokanee population goes way down those bigger lakers are going to waylay even more suckers. In the long run, less suckers is best for the kokanee. The few big Lakers that are bigger then 20" are a benifit to the fishery. Please release them.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wow, it's been too long since I have fished Green Mountain. I didn't realize there were pike in there. I would rather catch those than salmon all day! Is it a pretty good population?
 
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