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D-Moe said:
   
Nutmg1 said:
I think I read in a fishing mag 2 years ago that there was a private lake in the Fort Collins area with stealhead.  Did anyone else see that?
   
   
No offense bro, but, ...
   
1.  What does it matter if someone puts a salmon or a Vietnamese three-eyed catfish in his private lake?   

2.  I don't think a rainbow trout is considered a steelhead until it returns from the ocean, so it's difficult to figure how steelhead could be in a private lake (in Colorado). 
   

Actully BRO, there are a strain of steelheads in some of our waters they are called Donaldson steelheads.
 

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D-Moe said:
   
littlemac said:
just to chime in but a steelhead does not have to come from the ocean, ask anyone from the great lakes areas what there fishing for in the spring and fall!
   
   
Yep, that's true; all kinds of salmon live in the Great Lakes and run up feeder rivers/streams to spawn.  Good point. 
     
Agreed. Also, in the Great Lakes region, Steelhead are Steelhead whether they are in the lake or in the rivers.
 

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grod_001 said:
Actully BRO, there are a strain of steelheads in some of our waters they are called Donaldson steelheads.
   
     
Well, I've visited fish farms in Puget Sound where they raise "Donaldson Steelhead" in salt water pens to replicate the natural life of steelhead.  Those fish have been genetically engineered to grow fast for sale to supermarkets, etc. 
     
If you took fertilized eggs from those fish, hatched them, and put the fingerlings in a lake in Colorado, you'd have rainbow trout.  People might call them "Donaldson Steelhead," but ....
       
 
G

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You learn something new everyday. I've heard of "donaldson Steelhead" for years and always just assumed, I guess, that the name Donaldson referred to river where this strain of steelhead was native. I had no idea until this thread that it was a "designer" fish, genetically engineered for aquaculture. :eek:
Here's a link to a short interview with Lauren Donaldson concerning his development of the fish: http://www.aquaseed.com/publications/e&s_donaldson.htm

Interesting.
 

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I used to talk to the guy who was the head fish biologist for the state, the only thing he cared about was kokanee salmon and rainbows. He hated the macs and didnt care about browns either. The guy was just a biologist and not a sportsman, he looked at things in a different perspective than I did. He knew all about fish but nothing about how to catch them.
 

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sakalmon said:
the only thing he cared about was kokanee salmon and rainbows. He hated the macs and didnt care about browns either.
Well there's a surprise.

Koke & Rainbows=Money
Big Lakers and Browns eat=Money

It always comes down to the same thing. 'Save the kokes'


[me=Jay_In_Centennial] [/me]
 

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Kitchenmonkey said:
Seems like we had enough food for an 11 pound king salmon in Williams Fork.  WF is up in the mountains, right?   nearly all of the high mountain predatory (read lake trout) I've caught in mountain lakes have been pretty fat.  Not every chinook will grow to 11 pounds, most will be in the 2 to 3 pound range (Im guessing)when you catch them, thus making them about the same size as a decent "eater" lake trout, good sized rainbow, or brown trout,  all pretty voracious predatory fish and I don't see them eating themselves out of house and home.  I don't think our lakes would have any problem supporting a population of chinooks.  Bring on the kings ;D
A 2-3 pound king is not a king. Thats a waste of resources for an already wasteful agency. My last king was 42#, my smallest to date is 23#, I don't want to catch a 3# king just to say I did it in CO. Let's figure out how much it would cost to introduce Chinook Salmon to Colorado and then spend that money on easements for access to solid trout fishing, education on things like this New Zealand Snail thing, or perhaps the continued rehabilitation of the fisheries that were so severely damaged in the drought a few years ago. A 3# king would not give you the fight of a 3# rainbow. Last year I caught a 28" steelhead while king fishing, I also caught a 36# king the same day. The king was fun, the steelhead flat out rocked my world. Stick with what works in CO in my opinion.
 

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D-Moe said:
   
Nutmg1 said:
I think I read in a fishing mag 2 years ago that there was a private lake in the Fort Collins area with stealhead.  Did anyone else see that?
   
   
No offense bro, but, ...
   
1.  What does it matter if someone puts a salmon or a Vietnamese three-eyed catfish in his private lake?   

2.  I don't think a rainbow trout is considered a steelhead until it returns from the ocean, so it's difficult to figure how steelhead could be in a private lake (in Colorado). 
   
My bad,
My memory isnt so good. It was an artical in the Colorado Fishing Mag that use to be sold at 7-11. I thought steelhead were salmon. In any case the artical was about a private lake that did stock salmon. (NOT kokanee) I'll look around and see if I can find it. I assumed someone here would know what I was talking about.
 

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Seems like we had enough food for an 11 pound king salmon in Williams Fork. WF is up in the mountains, right? nearly all of the high mountain predatory (read lake trout) I've caught in mountain lakes have been pretty fat. Not every chinook will grow to 11 pounds, most will be in the 2 to 3 pound range (Im guessing)when you catch them, thus making them about the same size as a decent "eater" lake trout, good sized rainbow, or brown trout, all pretty voracious predatory fish and I don't see them eating themselves out of house and home. I don't think our lakes would have any problem supporting a population of chinooks. Bring on the kings ;D
obvioisly this is aquite old post but Williams fork does not have enough food for chinook. Not even close. That 11 lbs was a recently stocked (at the time) salmon. Keep I. Mind they don’t stay alive after the spawn. They die.
Williams Fork barely has enough food for the Pike and just having like in those waters alone obliterates any decent food for the Salmon. Also, like mentioned earlier, baitfish is almost non existent in those waters.
Simple matter of the fact, when Colorado got wild years ago putting Pike and Tiger Muskie and Bass in all the waters, they effectively ruled out Salmon. Those fish use up anything Salmon eat. In larger bodies of water, it’s not a big deal but the waters in Colorado can’t handle all those species. Baitfish don’t survive well in our lakes. At all. That’s what it all comes down to.

this is from someone who grew up fishing all over northwestern Colorado.
 
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