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The swimbait game is absolutely brutal when first starting out, and I don't think there are many people that are exceptions to that rule. Obviously you have to be prepared for lots of time on the water without fish but I think the part that is worse is that first year when it takes forever to learn the basics (casting, timing bites, finding waters where fish may actually eat them, learning to fish for reaction strikes vs. feeding strikes).

I would suggest never asking another question about swimbaits and try to forget they ever existed. Otherwise your life will spiral downward at an incredible rate, leading to things like divorce and bankruptcy. :D

In all seriousness, the best way to go about it is take it very slow at first. Buy three baits at most, probably just two. Don't spend a week straight fishing them, not while you are just beginning. Throw them a bit each time you go and just try to learn something each time, not matter how small. Sometimes tiny details make all the difference in fishing.

It's a penis size/inferiority complex thing. They feel better about their shortcomings if they huck 8" dildoes around. OOPS I meant swimbaits-

OOOh looky at this massive Hudd I just picked up--(wink,wink)
You sound like my Dad. Which means you probably still haven't learned to use a baitcaster. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I would suggest never asking another question about swimbaits and try to forget they ever existed. Otherwise your life will spiral downward at an incredible rate, leading to things like divorce and bankruptcy. :D
Hehe, noted. Not buying anything now. Just learning.
The current goal is to learn to make use of my fishing maps and find some good spots. Eventually to catch some perch and give them a treatment they deserve with no stinky foot smelling cheese.
 

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The swimbait game is absolutely brutal when first starting out, and I don't think there are many people that are exceptions to that rule. Obviously you have to be prepared for lots of time on the water without fish but I think the part that is worse is that first year when it takes forever to learn the basics (casting, timing bites, finding waters where fish may actually eat them, learning to fish for reaction strikes vs. feeding strikes).

I would suggest never asking another question about swimbaits and try to forget they ever existed. Otherwise your life will spiral downward at an incredible rate, leading to things like divorce and bankruptcy. :D

In all seriousness, the best way to go about it is take it very slow at first. Buy three baits at most, probably just two. Don't spend a week straight fishing them, not while you are just beginning. Throw them a bit each time you go and just try to learn something each time, not matter how small. Sometimes tiny details make all the difference in fishing.



You sound like my Dad. Which means you probably still haven't learned to use a baitcaster. :D
Dude you could hand me a brand new baitcaster and I'd throw it in the lake. those things. I have absolutely no need for one- GAWD i hate those things.
 

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Hahaaaa. Don't knock the blue cheese till you try it. My buddy brought me in a butterflied trout the other day stuffed with blue cheese and onions. I thought I was gonna die but nope. It was really good.

I watched a guy hurl a big swimbait once up at lake dead prez once. It was crazy. I know I've seen him on a fishing show before. Can't remember who he was though. Some quide outta aurora or something. I didn't look to close at his rig but it was fancy. Trying to look up
Rigs now
 

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The swimbait game is absolutely brutal when first starting out, and I don't think there are many people that are exceptions to that rule. Obviously you have to be prepared for lots of time on the water without fish but I think the part that is worse is that first year when it takes forever to learn the basics (casting, timing bites, finding waters where fish may actually eat them, learning to fish for reaction strikes vs. feeding strikes).
Solid

I would suggest never asking another question about swimbaits and try to forget they ever existed. Otherwise your life will spiral downward at an incredible rate, leading to things like divorce and bankruptcy. :D
Even in jest, so very true...


You sound like my Dad. Which means you probably still haven't learned to use a baitcaster. :D
LMAO! Yep, you called it! :D
 

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Geez just when things were getting fun. We were just about to discuss the finer points of Anal sex!
 

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Do it in the Off Topic section and don't ruin a great informational thread!!! :nono:
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
do the super flukes (and jr) count in the "don't even try it" super secret ninja spy land of swimbaits?

grabbed a couple of those on clearance at gander mtn for spring.
 

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In all seriousness, the best way to go about it is take it very slow at first. Buy three baits at most, probably just two. Don't spend a week straight fishing them, not while you are just beginning. Throw them a bit each time you go and just try to learn something each time, not matter how small. Sometimes tiny details make all the difference in fishing.
This is good advice - see if you can find a couple swimbaits you can throw with heavy conventional gear if you don't want to drop the cash for a swimbait specific rod. Most heavy casting or flipping rods can handle the lighter ones. Then go to a lake where you know the fish are on the chew and throw them all day, and if you can handle it, all night.

The hardest thing about swimbait is that you're often fishing for one or two bites per trip - it can be painful watching others land fish left, right, and center on conventional gear while your thumb erodes to a bloody nub and your rotator cuff slowly but surely turns into something akin to pulled pork, complete with blood-red barbecue sauce, and nothing is willing to go leviathan on your lure.

On the flip side, it's fun, addictive, and can be a great way to catch big fish, and to skunk spectacularly. CO has some swimbait addicts, some of whom hide in the dark, and we have at least one world-class swimbait rod builder.
 

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In all seriousness, the best way to go about it is take it very slow at first. Buy three baits at most, probably just two. Don't spend a week straight fishing them, not while you are just beginning. Throw them a bit each time you go and just try to learn something each time, not matter how small. Sometimes tiny details make all the difference in fishing.

Idk. Personally, I think if you are serious about throwing swimbaits you need to rig up with swimbaits, and only swimbaits. Maybe a jig or senko rod just incase... but IMO gaining any amount of confidence with swimbaits is going to take a hell of a lot longer if you only make a few casts each trip. I personally would recommend spending a week straight fishing them. To each their own, either way to the OP take the majorities advice and run the other way :D
 
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