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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks,
Was looking around the web the other day for rods that are "drop shot specific", and most all of the threads I read were for 1 piece rods. Don't get me wrong, I like one piece rods, but I travel on occasion and I don't want to bring a 7' rod tube with me ... done it, it sucks. I go up to MN on a regular basis since I have family up that way, and we drop shot there for smallies quite a bit. They're just suckers for the drop shot. Use the technique out here on occasion too, but with a rod not actually made for drop shotting, and was hoping to get a dedicated set up.

So I really have two questions. First, why do most of the reviews say you want a soft action on the tip? One of the big issues I have with drop shotting is doing it in the wind, and I can't see where having a softer tip is going to do anything for sensitivity. Any thoughts?

Much more importantly though, what 2 pc rods are out there that you'd recommend as drop shotters. I'm willing to consider just about any price range within reason ($500 is not reaonable).

Best regards,
Dogwood
 

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It looks like a bunch of people on the web use the Shimano Clarus for drop shotting and it comes in 2 piece...
 

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So I really have two questions. First, why do most of the reviews say you want a soft action on the tip? One of the big issues I have with drop shotting is doing it in the wind, and I can't see where having a softer tip is going to do anything for sensitivity. Any thoughts?
I use light weight braid exclusively with a mono leader. For me, the softer tip provides a smoother presentation. Ideally, you want the weight to rest on the bottom and provide action using your hand/arm. With a stiffer rod, you tend to lose contact with the bottom, jerking the "bait" violently. A soft tip allows you to wiggle the "bait" while keeping the weight in contact with the bottom.
 

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dropshot, do you use a spinning rod or a baitcaster?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dropshot,
So I get what you're saying about a soft tip kind of dampening the force applied when trying to impart a bit of action onto the bait, thanks for taking the time to write out a few sentences. Not sure I see how a "soft tip" or "fast action" improves sensitivity, but that's just something I'll have to come to grips with! FWIW, I'm generally throwing something like 8-10 lb nanofil with a couple feet of 6 lb flouro leader ... it's pretty thin, wouldn't want to go any lighter when dealing with 3-5 lb smallies. Been fishing a drop shot on a 7'0" St. Croix Premier (I think it's a Premier). It's a 4-10 lb 2 pc stick, think it's about a $100 rod these days (I bought it better than a decade back from Bobby Hix when it was about $80) ... it does OK, but wanting to see if there are any other options out there that might improve sensitivity, decrease arm/shoulder wear, and possibly improve the number of hookups.

Zman (the guy with a cove named after him!),
Thanks for the recommendation, I'll definitely have a look.

Ratt,
Tenkara my furry white nutsack! Tell you what, if you don't like your wrist, grip strength, or shoulders, go and drop shot with a flail stick for a few hours and let me know what you think. The first day I drop shotted for a long while (blind casting an area, not vertical presentation), I did it with an 8' St. Croix Eyecon (which is a great slip bobber rod) ... after 2 hrs, I was ready to hit the bars. Even a 7' stick is more than enough for jiggling a little soft plastic ... not sure that length is an advantage for drop shotting.

Thanks again, gents.

Best regards,
Dogwood
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Live, or rubber? I drop shotted live ones the other day, but at the rates I was getting bit (and missing as much as not, and hence one part of the original question regarding sensitivity), I would have went through all 3 dozen in a few hours if we'd have kept at it. A guy can get poor that way given what they're charging for leeches! Being that I didn't buy those 3 dozen, it didn't seem fair to my underemployed friend to use up all those baits. Plus, they ate em just fine under a cork. They seem to not steal nearly as many under a bobber than using the drop shot (this actually makes perfect sense). They ate the rubber variety with enough regularity to keep my interest.
 

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Live only. Same report from today and was using both dropshot and slip bobbers. I am an absolute neophyte at these techniques. Wind was honking at 20+ and the boat was swinging all over on Spot Lock. Trout were being caught on deep choronos.
 

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dropshot, do you use a spinning rod or a baitcaster?
I fish from a float tube, so most of my presentations are vertical, and frequently deep. Not a lot of casting for distance. I have one of each on board, the baitcaster helps reduce line twist and is used mostly as a dead stick, but I don't focus on the reel as much as the action of the rod.
 

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I use Power Pro or Suffix 832 and I think the braid transmits the sensitivity I need.

Most people put too much action into their dropshot presentations. No need for a violent hook set like slab spooning. Jerking up and down is overkill and sometimes counterproductive. I get more bites with less action/no action. When the water warms up fish will slam your "bait," but during a tough bite, you will need to coax them to bite.

When using leeches of a piece of nightcrawler, keep contact with the bottom and if/when you feel a tap, use just a gentle lift to feel the fish, then reel up. 99% of the time they will be hooked in the roof of the mouth.
 
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