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Discussion Starter #1
well I started my new job today... wasnt bad worked my *** off today but hey thats how it goes... construction is what im doin now... I am working down at Chatfield Res and we are redoing all the campsites in loop A and B I dont know how it looked before but everything I seen today (which was the entire site) was brand spankin new....Im doin the prep work and framing for the concrete to be poured on each new campsite....every campsite has there own water pump as well as electricity Im not sure if that was there before but this is all brand new we should be done with the whole project by March so if anyone happens to stay there in loop A or loop B I built those campsites!!!!BTW I get into chatfield for free now everyday can even probably go fish on lunch and after work which is pretty cool.....today though the lake looked pretty slushy from where I was....
 

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Congrats and good luck on your new job, pitbull. I just secured two jobs, of sorts, for next year. I just signed a contract to consult for the Colorado Division of Water Quality to help set temperature standards for state water to insure healthy warm and cold water fish populations statewide (messy issue), and negotiated another to help write a species assessment for brook trout for the forest service region in our part of the country. Last couple days at the office haven't been half bad. This is really going to cut into my fishing time for next year, however.

If anyone knows of someone who needs a fishery consultant for any projects they're working on, I've still got a lot of time to fill up next year.
 

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congrats on the job pitbull. I'm building a log home up by Turks head for a couple and with a twenty power spotting scope I might be able to see you.
 

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Spend nearly half your life in college and grad school studying fish and biology, fail to find a real job, and fall back on consulting.  If you're good at consulting, real job not necessary.  Too early for me to know if I'm good enough to keep myself working as a consultant, so I'll continue to look for full-time jobs.  Fisheries is a good field to be in for jobs.  Lots of work available.  Another way to start is to work seasonal jobs as a fish or wildlife technician while your working on a college degree.  Sets you up for full-time jobs when you graduate, if they're available.  You won't make a killing, but a lot of the work is great - electrofishing streams, sampling lakes - you see lots of big fish and learn where they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
well thats pretty cool that would be a pretty fun job I would think....doin all that would definitely give you a edge on fishing and if your a fisherman that would be a dream job I would think (besides a pro fisherman) hmm im gonna look into that sounds interesting.........and mojo I will be there!!!
 

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Oh, the part I forgot is that you might also end up with many thousands of dollars in student loan dept to pay off when you're done!  It's really great!

Despite all that, I don't really have much to complain about. I love fishing, and I love biology. I figured 'why not be a fish biologist.' You pretty much need to research how to do it, then strategically plan to make it happen. It took me longer than most people, because I did a few other things along the way (attention deficit).
 

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Cutthroat, you're living my dream. Out of high school I wanted to be a Fisheries Biologist but got side tracked with work and house payments and never got into it. :'( Sounds like you are making it work for you and I hope it's as fulfilling as it sounds. Keep us posted on what you find out this year. Looney.
 

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I am living a dream, of sorts.  I would still rather be fishing, though! 

A little known fact about doing fish research and graduate school is that you generally get paid to do it.  If you finish college and can get into a graduate program, you usually get a stipend (or salary) for being a research assistant, to work on your graduate project.  Or, you may get paid to TA classes.  Either way, your tuition is either waived entirely, or paid for by some of your research funds.  It's not a bad deal, but work is work.

Everything aside, it is fulfilling.  I can't really think of another job I would prefer, other than no job (just fishing).  Something's got to pay for that hobby, though.  I think I'm a fisherman with a research habit.
 

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EARLIER THIS YEAR, DOW HAD ENTRY SEMINARS FOR WILDLIFE OFFICERS. DID YOU GET A CHANCE WITH THAT? WITH THOSE DEGREES , YOU SHOULD BE A GOOD CANDIDATE. WHO KNOWS STILL SOMETHING MIGHT BE THERE
 

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They are looking for regional wildlife biologists/managers. Although that sounds like fun, they tell me I am overqualified for that. Masters degree is about what they are looking for for those jobs. That's the problem with getting more and more education, it can start to limit your job opportunities, at some level. If they were hiring research biologists, I'm sure I would be considered a candidate, though. They just don't hire many research biologists.

Fortunately, 30 years ago there was a big boom in hiring for fishery and wildlife biologists throughout the federal and state governemnt agencies, and now lots of those folks are retiring, which promises to open even more job possibilities in the future. Many of those folks had bachelors degrees, and they will likely be replaced today by folks with Masters and PhD's.
 
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