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I'm about to order some jig n pigs with pork trailers. I've never fished this way before so any good suggestions would be appreciated. So far I've only researched this, finding this to be one of the best methods for early season largemouth. I do consider largemouth my weakness & not in a good way. I've caught decent quantity in CO, but the quality has been subpar. What brands/styles do you recommend for the jig & any ad ons? Maybe you could throw in a few tips on the way to fish it. Thanks
 

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My best advise is tie on a jig and fish with NOTHING ELSE, for months, until you are comfortable with the jig.
That is the only way to learn a technique. There are no shortcuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
swimbait said:
My best advise is tie on a jig and fish with NOTHING ELSE, for months, until you are comfortable with the jig.
That is the only way to learn a technique. There are no shortcuts.
Yeah but I don't want to fish all spring with the wrong jig ??? Surely, there are better ones like any lure type.
 

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I still prefer the original #11 Uncle Josh pork frog on a 1/4 to 5/8 oz rattle back type jig with a black/blue flash or black/chartreuse or all black skirt for the ponds and small lakes around here.

That's my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
gofindyourowndamnfish said:
I still prefer the original #11 Uncle Josh pork frog on a 1/4 to 5/8 oz rattle back type jig with a black/blue flash or black/chartreuse or all black skirt for the ponds and small lakes around here.

That's my 2 cents.
I was reading about Uncle Josh a few days ago & noticed tackletour gave a great review. I don't believe this is the #11 your refer to: http://www.tackletour.com/reviewunclejoshjig.html
Is there a difference?

This caught my eye too: http://www.tackletour.com/review2009jigroundupp8.html
 

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Pork trailers are awesome....but plastic trailers work good also. You can't go wrong if you stay with natural colors...brown...green...black.
 

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I use jig n pigs all of the time, it is a big fish bait! I just buy BP enticer 1/4 to 1/2 oz black jigs and use Uncle Josh black #11, Jumbos, and Big Daddy depending on what the fish want. Don't get to caught up in the fancy colors. This bait is extremely productive in early spring through spawn.
 

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bassboy said:
Pork trailers are awesome....but plastic trailers work good also. You can't go wrong if you stay with natural colors...brown...green...black.


I like the pork trailers and I've caught bass on 'em. The draw back to the pork trailer is it is messy and hard to remove from the hook when your done. I'd say get some of both, plastic and pork. Zoom trailers are good {plastic} and not expensive at all. All I've ever used as far as pork is uncle josh and those are very good. One thing I'll say is that when you're done fishing don't forget to remove the pork trailer or it can ruin the whole jig when it dries out. Some times I'll cut into the pork with a pocket knife to make placing it on the hook easier. I've done well with black blue and dark green. But those are mainly the colors I throw, I've seen the while jig&pigs and have heard they're good but I haven't fished 'em. I like the booyah jigs with rattles, but they are a little more expensive. I've also done well with bass pro jigs w/ out rattles and you can get those for about $2 a jig. Methods for fishing 'em can very greatly, this time of year I'd use 'em slow for the most part. Also jigs&pigs can be really good for a vertical presentation, with fish tacking the jig on the fall, so be ready as the jig drops through the water. Also if you feel anything at all with the jig give it a pull. If It's just a rock ex. it will usually just go right over it. Sometimes those little bumps are bass sucking it up and you'll feel the weight when you pull. Anyway that's my two cents hope that helps.
 

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FISHAH0LIC said:
swimbait said:
My best advise is tie on a jig and fish with NOTHING ELSE, for months, until you are comfortable with the jig.
That is the only way to learn a technique. There are no shortcuts.
Yeah but I don't want to fish all spring with the wrong jig ??? Surely, there are better ones like any lure type.
When in doubt, go for average. Most folks use 3/8oz, and black/blue is the most common color. But you make a good point. It is hard to get up to speed with a new technique that you have yet to develop confidence in. :-\

But honestly, if you look at the advice from "pros", again and again this is what they say. It has worked for me. Deep cranking, slab spooning, drop shotting, jig 'n pig, all of these I learned by doing nothing else until I felt confident in, and comfortable with, the tactic. You need to mix it up within any given context, this forces you to understand where a tactic is best suited, and where it may be weak. For example, a lot of people think that a drop shot is a deep water, vertical presentation. This is simply not the case! I catch more than a few fish treating a drop shot like a Carolina rig... The same with jigs. I got on an unbelievable bite at Lake Fork burning a jig over hydrilla. They would not touch a 'trap, did not want a spinnerbait. They wanted a jig, and they wanted it skipping across the water as fast as I could move it!

"Force" the bait to work! That is the whole deal... to make a bait work when others would not even consider it a possibility. That is the definition of a comfort zone!

Cheers!

Shaun
 

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swimbait said:
My best advise is tie on a jig and fish with NOTHING ELSE, for months, until you are comfortable with the jig.
That is the only way to learn a technique. There are no shortcuts.
Shaun, thats really one dimensional and boring. Respectfully, my suggestion is to focus on one particular technique as well,however, forcefeeding fish a bait isnt always the answer. Adaptability and being open to changing techniques while on the water is key to productive days here in Colorado. Diversify your approach (especially in the spring) when fishing slow presentation lures.
 

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JWurgaft said:
bassboy said:
Pork trailers are awesome....but plastic trailers work good also. You can't go wrong if you stay with natural colors...brown...green...black.


I like the pork trailers and I've caught bass on 'em. The draw back to the pork trailer is it is messy and hard to remove from the hook when your done. I'd say get some of both, plastic and pork. Zoom trailers are good {plastic} and not expensive at all. All I've ever used as far as pork is uncle josh and those are very good. One thing I'll say is that when you're done fishing don't forget to remove the pork trailer or it can ruin the whole jig when it dries out. Some times I'll cut into the pork with a pocket knife to make placing it on the hook easier. I've done well with black blue and dark green. But those are mainly the colors I throw, I've seen the while jig&pigs and have heard they're good but I haven't fished 'em. I like the booyah jigs with rattles, but they are a little more expensive. I've also done well with bass pro jigs w/ out rattles and you can get those for about $2 a jig. Methods for fishing 'em can very greatly, this time of year I'd use 'em slow for the most part. Also jigs&pigs can be really good for a vertical presentation, with fish tacking the jig on the fall, so be ready as the jig drops through the water. Also if you feel anything at all with the jig give it a pull. If It's just a rock ex. it will usually just go right over it. Sometimes those little bumps are bass sucking it up and you'll feel the weight when you pull. Anyway that's my two cents hope that helps.
Pork trailer's already have a slit in them for the hook. easy to put on and off.
 

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discloco said:
Shaun, thats really one dimensional and boring...
Perhaps. But I am here to tell you I can fish a jig. ;) I understand completely what you are getting at. But there is no way around it; if you want to learn anything, it is best done by massive amounts of repetition. Andre Agassi hit one million tennis balls as a kid. I am pretty sure it was boring, but he got good at it. It all comes down to what you want. If you want to get good, it will be a frustrating and tedious process. On the other hand, the rewards are great.

Not trying to argue, just representing a hardworking, boring viewpoint.


bassboy said:
Pork trailer's already have a slit in them for the hook. easy to put on and off.
+1! Pork is the greatest. There is something about it... they don't call 'em "Jig 'n Plastisols" ;D

I prefer a real pig if I am on a primary jig bite, in other words if the jig rod stays in my hand all day. If I have a jig rod sitting on the deck and am throwing a trap or spinnerbait, covering water, and tossing the jig at isolated cover, then plastic is very practical due to it's ability to withstand drying out. The last thing you want in this world (besides Guinea worms) is a mummified pig cemented to your jig. THAT IS hard to remove! The thing with a pig, like bassboy said, is it has a little slit punched in it. It runs perpendicular to the front of the bait, and the best way to remove a pig is to TURN IT SIDEWAYS IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE HOOK!! Otherwise, the barb prevents the pig from dis-engaging. Good thing too, or we would go bankrupt replacing our pigs! The real thing is you just CAN NOT force a pig off the hook. You have to just finesse it and wiggle it... and it will just pop right off easy as pie.

SS
 
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