Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Continuing our push to make available better data about wild and native trout in Colorado, we've just posted a dataset providing extraordinary mapping detail for Rocky Mountain National Park. As always, WildTroutStreams.com is a non-commercial site and the data is free for download. You'll need to view it in Google Earth, the National Map, or similar.

Every named stream and lake in the park is mapped. Coloring indicates whether the water body holds Native fish only (blue), Non-natives only (red), or a mix (purple). More information is available here.

Enjoy!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Where do you pull the data for this? I mean, how accurate is it?
My guess is it's pretty accurate. Certainly, if you're planning a trip to the park and a stream segment or lake is shown as barren, it almost certainly not worth fishing. Specific species are probably a bit hit or miss. Transitions from one species mix to another even more so, except where there are specific barriers that cause them. I did not include abundance info in this dataset, though there are tables in the report which provide them (those are probably much less accurate).

The source document for all of this is the 2000 Fisheries Management Report which you can also download from the website. I did correspond with a fisheries biologist for the park. He feels that the info is still pretty accurate.

One complication he did mention is among the streams in the Colorado Headwaters section. There's a ditch that connects all of those streams up near the headwaters and at certain times of the year fish will migrate along the ditch and drop down into streams that are shown on the map as "barren". Most of the year, however, they really are barren. I decided NOT to show the ditch, or to worry about that complexity. I certainly wouldn't want to hike all the way up into the headwater on the off chance that a few fish have dropped down from the ditch. A conservationist might care, but not an angler.

The lake info, according to the biologist I corresponded with, is still extremely accurate. Since they haven't stocked any stream or lake in the park since 1969, if a population dies out in a lake, it's gone. He told me about one change from the 2000 report, which is reflected in the dataset I published.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top