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Howdy all, I'm new to colorado (east coast my entire life) and also new to fly fishing so i welcome everybody who is willing/able to guide me on gear for beginners and areas! I'll be taking my first fly fishing beginner course in early May and have a list of gear i'd like to acquire over the next few months, however, the biggest part to this is what rod and reel or even combo would be great for someone just getting into fly fishing? there are so many options here on the level of just starting but would like to hear from the people. I've fished with a spinner and rod combo since i was a kid and know that when you buy the combo setup and generally the lesser expensive of them, you end up graduating from that purchase rather quickly. So i'm looking for something i can learn on but not the cheapest.

thanks in advance and looking forward to hearing from anyone and everyone!!
 

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Hope you enjoy learning about fly fishing it’s been rewarding for me and Colorado is a great state to experience it. The combos are something to generally stay away from in fly fishing also. For reels I like Lamson. They all have a sealed drag which makes them submergible without issue and I do use my drag often on larger fish. I have the lightspeed model ($300) but they make a liquid model for under $100 which is a good deal and I have been seeing the speedster model on sale for $200. The liquid also has some spool/reel combos if you will be fishing a variety of line types it would be a good option. In my 20+ years of fly fishing I’ve found the rod warranty to be super important. I mostly fish expensive rods ($500+ G loomis, sage) but have heard good about less expensive brands like echo and tfo. For Colorado I would recommend a 5 or 6 weight ten foot rod for tailwaters, freestones and stillwaters. I prefer 6 weight for extra backbone on bigger fish. Ten footers are just better all around at casting. I’m self taught and time on water is number one to learning but you can shortcut with a guided trip or going with a friend which I would both recommend over fly fishing classes. Hope this helps.
 

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I'm on my second year of fly fishing; I too used spinning gear my whole life and since getting into fly fishing I don't even think about picking it back up. I love fly fishing. I initially carried both when I went fishing, but the best advice I got was to not do that. Force yourself to use the fly gear as you'll push yourself to learn and deal with challenging situations (like wind).

Where (types of water) and what you want to fish for (cold and/or warm water species) will matter for rod-reel choice. If you're crawling around the brush following a tiny creek ("blue line" which references how they are represented on a map) where a 10" fish is huge, a 3wt or smaller is preferred. If you're looking at creeks which are bigger but not huge, then you'll want more rod length and maybe come up in size. Many will say a 9' 5wt is the best all around for Colorado... and I'd say that is true if you're looking at larger waters and fish which I've done only a little bit of thus far.

I started cheap on the gear, and haven't reached the point where I feel like my gear is holding me back, so I don't have recommendations on that front.
 

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I wouldn't invest a great deal of money in any outfit to start out. Who knows if you will enjoy fly fishing more than any other type of fishing. I bought a Cortland combo from Walmart for my grandson and it isn't bad to learn on. No it isn't the greatest rod in the world but it isn't 500 bucks either. Remember that ' the tug is the drug ' it really doesn't matter to me what kind of rod is in my hand.
 

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I wouldn't invest a great deal of money in any outfit to start out. Who knows if you will enjoy fly fishing more than any other type of fishing. I bought a Cortland combo from Walmart for my grandson and it isn't bad to learn on. No it isn't the greatest rod in the world but it isn't 500 bucks either. Remember that ' the tug is the drug ' it really doesn't matter to me what kind of rod is in my hand.
My father visited from out of state last year and wanted to try fly fishing (has done many other kinds in his life). He picked up a Cortland combo from Walmart while getting a license, and after I gave him some pointers, was catching on dries on stillwater. He left it here when the trip was over, and I took it out recently. I caught with it. I think I'm going to try for carp this year and that may be the rod I do it with... we'll see.
 

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Howdy all, I'm new to colorado (east coast my entire life) and also new to fly fishing so i welcome everybody who is willing/able to guide me on gear for beginners and areas! I'll be taking my first fly fishing beginner course in early May and have a list of gear i'd like to acquire over the next few months, however, the biggest part to this is what rod and reel or even combo would be great for someone just getting into fly fishing? there are so many options here on the level of just starting but would like to hear from the people. I've fished with a spinner and rod combo since i was a kid and know that when you buy the combo setup and generally the lesser expensive of them, you end up graduating from that purchase rather quickly. So i'm looking for something i can learn on but not the cheapest.

thanks in advance and looking forward to hearing from anyone and everyone!!
I agree with the other members. No need to invest a lot of $ in a set up to get started. The Redington “Classic Trout” rod (5wt) is an affordable option that I highly recommend. No need to spend more than a $100 bucks on a decent 5/6 freshwater reel. My biggest piece of advice is just to get out there and start fly-fishing and have fun, make mistakes, learn, and adjust. As soon as you start catching fish on your own that will be the biggest thrill….Ray
 

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I second the Reddington Classic trout, although there are a lot of comparable options. The reviews on that rod are outstanding and I like it so much I have 5 of them in multiple different sizes. Pair that with maybe a lamson liquid and a scientific anglers line and you'll have a setup that will see you through pretty much anything. It's still one of my favorite rods especially in the 3wt range and I have probably 20 including a couple $800 rods. You can't beat reddington as a whole.
 
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