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Hey guys! I've recently moved to Boulder from Melbourne, Australia. I've wanted to get into fly fishing for years and after taking a beginners course at a local fly shop it's time to get the ball rolling.

I'm wondering if you guys can recommend me a setup under $300 to get me started with a decent setup that I can catch pretty big (and small) fish with and won't have to upgrade for a long, long time?

I was thinking either the Redington CT (classic trout) 9ft, line weight 5 rod ($89.95 on sale) + the Lamson Konic II ($100). That setup would be about $200.

The other option I was looking at was the Echo Carbon ($170) 9ft 5wt + Ross Flyrise reel ($100).

Is there any reason to spend nearly $100 more on the Echo rod over the Redington? Any other setups you think might suit me better? This setup would be mainly used fishing larger streams and rivers in Colorado, Montana and Wyoming, though I would also like some flexibility to use it in smaller creeks as well.
 

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Don't know anything about fly gear, but as with everything in life; you get what you pay for. I'm sure the 100$ more expensive rod is a much better rod
 

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Don't know anything about fly gear, but as with everything in life; you get what you pay for. I'm sure the 100$ more expensive rod is a much better rod
Well, the CT is usually nearly $100 more (it's on sale). Otherwise it would be about the same price.
 

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I'd do the Echo with the Lamson as a combo if it was me, but you may want to see if you can find a place to cast both rods and see which one works for your casting style best.

The reel part is just a personal pref for the Lamson designs on my part.
 

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Invest in a good rod, line and terminal tackle. The reel is just a vehicle for the line. I wouldn't spend more than 80 on a reel. A good double taper floating lone will run you 60+. It's a good investment.
 

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Thanks so much for the assistance guys.

If I changed it up a bit and said I was getting a Tenkara Iwana for the small creeks around here in Boulder, as well as for backpacking around the high alpine creeks/lakes, would you still suggest the 9ft, 5wt rod for fishing in larger rivers going after larger fish (like in Montana/Wyoming)?
 

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If you're only going to own one rod..stick with the 9 foot five weight..A tenkara rod for small creeks great..for alpine lakes...bring your nine foot five weight.
 

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If you're only going to own one rod..stick with the 9 foot five weight..A tenkara rod for small creeks great..for alpine lakes...bring your nine foot five weight.
Noted.Is the 9, 5ft decent for those larger rivers in Wyoming and the larger fish?
 

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I really haven't fished Wyoming. I currently only own one rod..a 9 foot six weight...a cheap St Croix. When I first started fly fishing, I used an old tonkin cane..my next rod was fiberglass and than a Browning boron 4 weight. I stopped fly fishing for quite a few years and only really picked up the fly rod again a few years back. Loving it again. This winter, I spent about 75 hours just casting in the yard..figured I only have the one rod...I may as well get better at using it. I made casts to every tree, rock, bush and car in the yard..with the wind..against the wind..wind from both sides.. trees at my back..short casts..longer casts and everything in between. I plan on using my fly rod much more this season..just something different to do again..It's always nice mixing things up.
 

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I really haven't fished Wyoming. I currently only own one rod..a 9 foot six weight...a cheap St Croix. When I first started fly fishing, I used an old tonkin cane..my next rod was fiberglass and than a Browning boron 4 weight. I stopped fly fishing for quite a few years and only really picked up the fly rod again a few years back. Loving it again. This winter, I spent about 75 hours just casting in the yard..figured I only have the one rod...I may as well get better at using it. I made casts to every tree, rock, bush and car in the yard..with the wind..against the wind..wind from both sides.. trees at my back..short casts..longer casts and everything in between. I plan on using my fly rod much more this season..just something different to do again..It's always nice mixing things up.
That's some dedication right there!
 

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If you're only going to own one rod..stick with the 9 foot five weight...

^^ ^^

This.


Start with the 5 weight. If you "feel" you need more punch for the wind and larger rivers in Wyo, get a 7, then you can go on the quest for a 3 for Boulder Creek, but start with the 5 weight as it's a good all around choice.
 

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Craigslist is a great tool to use while looking for a new rod. A lot of times you can get a higher end rod for way less than it would retail for and sometimes said rods even still have their warranty card.

That's great that you have already taken classes- my next advice is (and its hard to be patient when you just want to get a new rod) go cast as many rods as you can. Try to go to at least 2 different fly shops and try a couple rods at each. Take it from someone who got impatient and didn't do his due diligence the first go around. I just recently picked up a new rod after lurking on CL for a couple months and doing my research in the meantime.

At the price point you are looking at you can absolutely get a great set up- some people believe in spending as little as they can and some believe in spending the extra money for higher end rods, it's all what your comfortable with.

This is an awesome forum and especially when you are seeking advice or have questions.....as long as its not about someones hot spot.

There are a couple threads in the fly fishing section, the first one is at the top- "all you need to know about fly fishing" or something like that. Another one with lots of good info on fly rods is "favorite stick".

Good luck!

PS- my go to is a 9' 5wt, but as you are about to find out, the idea of the "best suited" rod for CO gets a little convoluted.
 

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Get the best rod and reel you can afford, in a 9' 5wt if you only have one. If you cheap out now you'll just end up having to buy another one next year when you realize you bought a dud. DON'T get sucked into the ultra-fast action rods, they will not help you get better at casting, and most guys that have them end up over lining to slow them down anyway...
 

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I would recommend a 9ft 6wt if you're going to be using it for heavier stuff too. That's what I use and I've caught everything from tiny bluegill, crappie, perch, and more to pike, lake trout, bass, carp, etc. Its got a little extra backbone to help with the bigger stuff but is also light enough to handle the smaller stuff without feeling like you're fishing with a crane. Of course that stuff would depend on the manufacturer and rod, too. I bought a sage vantage like five years ago and continue to use it a ton til this day. It's a great all around rod and I'm glad I made the purchase. As far as a
reel is concerned, the Ross flyrise 2 has treated me well. You can get both for about $300 total and you should get a case with the rod.
 
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