Colorado Fisherman Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. I am about to give ice fishing a try this year. Right now, though, I hope to keep the expenses down as much as possible. With that in mind, can anyone provide me with some advice on what I might need (equipment, lures, bait), places to try (I'm in Thornton), and techniques that would help out a beginner. My grandfather is sending out an auger and some tip up traps from Maine, but otherwise, I don't have much else. Thanks for your help in getting someone started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Welcome to the site this is a great place to start. I to live in Thornton and sometimes have room for another. Certainly not an expert but can show some things I've learned along the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
It doesn't take a whole lotta special gear to get started ice fisn'n. Warm clothes, ice auger,ice scoop,& your regular old rods & reels,hooks,weights,a few jigs & maybe a sled to pull your stuff out with.That should get you started.Just get out there & talk to people,see what they are using & take it from there.Most fishermen are more than happy to hand out advise,& even a few secrets now & then 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Stores such as Kmart, etc. usually have those plastic kids sleds on sale really cheap when it becomes warmer. This won't help you this year but keep an eye out about the end of march. If you don't see any, ask someone to check in back. I did this last year and got a couple of nice ones for 2.50 each; regular 10 bucks.

A good 5 gallon bucket helps too.

A nice place to start out might be golden gate state park just up from golden. The fish arent big but there are lots of 'em. It would be a good place to get the feel for it.

Buy some spring bobbers too. They are cheap and work really well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I can't emphasize strongly enough,SAFETY!!! Try to go with some seasoned guys to learn from.It can be a ton of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
In addition to safety stuff and warm clothes, here's what I'd get to avoid breaking the bank:

Ice fishing rod and reel - $10-$25
They have some decent rods for cheap at GM.

Cajun Red Line - $4
This is my favorite monofil.

Bucket - $5?
Great to haul stuff in and great to sit on.

Tipup - $10-$18
Why not have another pole in the water to increase your chances for success?

Tipup line - $5

Small Tackle Box - $10

Tube jigs - $8 These seem to work well on all trout. To save money now, buy them as you need them. For example, if you are fishing Tarryall this weekend, buy micro and small orange or charteuse tube jigs and a pack of meal worms.

Ice scoop - $7? I forget what they cost, but when it gets cold and your holes start freezing over, you'll be glad you bought one.

Hand auger - $70

Walmart sled - $8
They work ok for hauling your stuff across the ice

Can cooler - $1
Nothing worse then grabbing an ice cold beer with ungloved hand ;D

Total - $138
I spend half of this on gas in a weekend. :mad:

Total with 10% GM discount - $125.00

I'm sure there are some other great suggestions from other folks on this board!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
Fortunately you may already have a lot of the stuff if you have been fishing for a while.

Some of the items can be gotten for free or very cheap.

5 gallon bucket you can often find these at restaurants (they get pickles in them) or at bakeries (they get frosting in them) they throw them away right and left.

Rods can be made from broken rods and broom handles some glue, a drill, electrical tape and reel and you are set.
Be sure to have large guides if possible to keep them from freezing.

You don't need a lot of tackle and very often all of your tackle needs will fit into trays that come with various tackle systems. If you don't have a system with trays you can pick up a couple for a few bucks at wally world.

For an ice scoop I know a guy who nailed a tuna can with a bunch of 6d nail holes in it to a piece of broom stick.

Glow jigs and small tubes can be bought fairly cheaply at any fishing store or center. Be sure to buy a hook sharpener to make sure they are razor sharp. Fish bite notoriously light in the winter and an even slightly dull hook will cost you fish.

The more expensive things like augers, let a friend bring it don't buy anything like that until you are sure you are making an investment that will be used.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
"Rods can be made from broken rods and broom handles some glue, a drill, electrical tape and reel and you are set."

Dan, this is almost exactly what my brother and I used as kids. We would use the old rod tip, a large wooden dowel, 2 nails, glue, and some fishing line. Voila! An ice fishing rod!

Aaahhh, the memories!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
deputycinnamonbear said:
for an inexpensive ice fishing pole check this thread.
good luck http://www.coloradofisherman.com/forum/index.php?topic=4263.0
Thats cool, i like the whole idea of making your own gear...although i have a history at Cabela's that would say otherwise.

Soooo...whats the biggest fish any of you guys have caught on homemade ice fishing rods? i imagine it would take some serious gear to pull big a laker or pike out of the water...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
wraithR1 said:
Ice fishing rod and reel - $10-$25
Cajun Red Line - $4
Bucket - $5? 
Tipup - $10-$18
Why not have another pole in the water to increase your chances for success?
Tipup line - $5
Small Tackle Box - $10
Tube jigs - $8
Ice scoop - $7?
Hand auger -  $70
Walmart sled - $8
Can cooler - $1
Missing your first three fish to poor hooksets.... Priceless!

Of the things you're not getting from Maine, here are some refined prices:

You can get an ice scoop for $2 (Sportsman's Warehouse)
vinyl line for two tipups is about $4 (Sportsman's Warehouse)
A spool of Cajun Ice line (enough for two ice spin reels) for $2 (Sportsmans again)

For a new Mora Auger, Jax (Fort Collins) has them for $40.

You can do without the sled, as most of the stuff will fit in your bucket and you can carry your auger in your opposite handle. An alternative to a bucket is a backpack and a folding chair (which you may already have). Use a small tackle box from your summer kit (you don't need a big box for ice fishing). You can use the same tube jigs you use during the summer, unless the colors are just way off (1-1.5" crappie/trout sized to 3" size tubes - depending on your quarry).

You can really do this with a small outlay of cash - even less than $100. If you don't like ice fishing (can't imagine that scenerio), you haven't invested much.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
wraithR1 said:
"Rods can be made from broken rods and broom handles some glue, a drill, electrical tape and reel and you are set."

Dan, this is almost exactly what my brother and I used as kids. We would use the old rod tip, a large wooden dowel, 2 nails, glue, and some fishing line. Voila! An ice fishing rod!

Aaahhh, the memories!
My kid and I made one just the other day...........I still need to catch a fish on it though!

Dan
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top