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Has anyone ever hiked down into New York Lake off off FDT 2221 from the Fulford side? Trail information is pretty slim but looks like it intersects with FDT 1898 for Nolan Lake—though it’s not clear on the descent into the basin from the summit of New York Mountain.
 

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Has anyone ever hiked down into New York Lake off off FDT 2221 from the Fulford side? Trail information is pretty slim but looks like it intersects with FDT 1898 for Nolan Lake—though it’s not clear on the descent into the basin from the summit of New York Mountain.
this is a timely question because I was planning a trip there but can't recall if there were any fish in this lake? It seems like I hiked in there about 20 years ago, but I fish a lot of those lakes in and around that area and can't specifically recall the details for this lake?

The term 'scramble' is used a lot for this trail on the internet when it reaches the lake which infers climbing down and through rock formations :)
 

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I haven't, but I do believe going in from the Fulford side is best. You should be able to 4x4 up to the polar star mine and head south from there flanking the ridge on the west side of the drainage, then drop down through steep skri to the lake, which will be the most difficult and time consuming part. It has been on my bucket list for a long time. I grew up in Lake Creek and know that it will be well worth the effort getting in there. I would really be interested to know how the journey was if you make it in there.
 

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I hiked the New York Lake trail last Saturday. If you take 418 past Fulford a few miles you will come to the trailhead, it is called New York Mtn Trailhead. This will link up with the New York Lake trail which is #2221. I have been hiking up to a variety of Alpine lakes since 1996 and this was by far the most challenging, tiring and even dangerous at times trail to follow. It is lightly used, impossible to follow on most sections without using GPS with the trail marked on the map since the trail is not visible in most sections.

There is little to no water to be found along it and most of it is exposed, be aware of the weather changes since you can't really see the storms coming until they are on top of you due to the extreme angle of the canyons and valleys. You know it is going to be challenging when you break out of the treeline at the very beginning of the NYL trail and have to literally climb down using all 4 appendages into the valley and still have about 3 miles of hiking which involves at least 2 more ascents and descents to get to the lake.

With that said, the views are literally breath taking, there are sections of the trail which run along 1000' plus cliffs, bring your camera. Don't bring a child or dog along unless they are very athletic and can climb. I made it to within .3 miles of the lake and the lightning ran me out of the valley. LOL
 

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I hiked the New York Lake trail last Saturday. If you take 418 past Fulford a few miles you will come to the trailhead, it is called New York Mtn Trailhead. This will link up with the New York Lake trail which is #2221. I have been hiking up to a variety of Alpine lakes since 1996 and this was by far the most challenging, tiring and even dangerous at times trail to follow. It is lightly used, impossible to follow on most sections without using GPS with the trail marked on the map since the trail is not visible in most sections.

There is little to no water to be found along it and most of it is exposed, be aware of the weather changes since you can't really see the storms coming until they are on top of you due to the extreme angle of the canyons and valleys. You know it is going to be challenging when you break out of the treeline at the very beginning of the NYL trail and have to literally climb down using all 4 appendages into the valley and still have about 3 miles of hiking which involves at least 2 more ascents and descents to get to the lake.

With that said, the views are literally breath taking, there are sections of the trail which run along 1000' plus cliffs, bring your camera. Don't bring a child or dog along unless they are very athletic and can climb. I made it to within .3 miles of the lake and the lightning ran me out of the valley. LOL
Dang man, thanks for that info. I've heard it is a tough one getting in there. Bummer you didn't make to the lake, but probably the right decision to head back with the weather changing. How long would you say it took you round trip?
 

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Slayer, you slay me! I have been told this quite a bit over the years. :) I hike up to these lakes just about every weekend in the summer and fall, the non stop action of catching fish all day and the solitude is incomparable to any other type of fishing I have done here in CO. I bring my dog along to get her and me in shape for grouse, chukar and ptarmigan season in September and then pheasant after that.

It took me about 4 hours overall out and back not including the last .3 miles to the lake as the crow flies by GPS. Making the lake would have involved another steep scrambling descent into the valley and then a steep climb up the lake. I have been known to take the 'straight' path to lakes ignoring the trails, but the mountains around this valley are extremely steep and the valley is the safest route up to this lake. I suspect making the lake would have added another hour or so to the whole trip.

I would add, if you are afraid of heights, this trail will get your guts tingling LOL

I bet the fishing would have been phenomenal if I would have made it to the lake!!
 

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I bet it is a fun hike. I too like the solitude and heights. And truth be told I like dumb cuttys.
 

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Sounds like quite the trail; enough to keep most of the lead-feet and orvis army away!

Totally agree with Mtntop285; hard to beat the solitude and experience of high elevation lakes. I often find the sights along way so amazing that fishing just becomes icing on the cake... Really good icing. And the color/variations in the fish up high is just something else.. I'm so hooked on picking blue dots on the map that I pretty much forget about river fishing till mid/later fall.
 

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Sounds like quite the trail; enough to keep most of the lead-feet and orvis army away!

Totally agree with Mtntop285; hard to beat the solitude and experience of high elevation lakes. I often find the sights along way so amazing that fishing just becomes icing on the cake... Really good icing. And the color/variations in the fish up high is just something else.. I'm so hooked on picking blue dots on the map that I pretty much forget about river fishing till mid/later fall.
haha, orvis army, I love it. My pack usually has enough supplies to last me 3-4 days if I can't hike out for some reason. Depending on the lake and trail I often see folks with shorts and t shirts with a bottle of water and nothing else and some of them have the nerve to make disparaging comments about all of my gear LOL I suspect none of these Orvis army members have been caught up there in a white out with lightning in July???
 

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haha, orvis army, I love it. My pack usually has enough supplies to last me 3-4 days if I can't hike out for some reason. Depending on the lake and trail I often see folks with shorts and t shirts with a bottle of water and nothing else and some of them have the nerve to make disparaging comments about all of my gear LOL I suspect none of these Orvis army members have been caught up there in a white out with lightning in July???
I'm the same way when it comes to being prepared. My last day trip was only about 4.9 miles round trip, but my pack weighed in at about 44 lbs. Doesn't take much time in the mountains to gain a firm respect for the fact that mother nature can flip the table on weather in a heartbeat... and a "white out with lightening" sounds pretty intense, I'll pass on that if possible!

Mtntop285 I'm curious; do you carry bear mace or a handgun in the backcountry, or do you just go for it bare handed?
 

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Hi B, I have a very real fear of mtn lions and bears in the backcountry, with that said, I don't carry mace or a gun, I do however have a 6" fixed blade knife which I keep very handy but I rely more on their natural fear of us to keep em away.

I have never come across a bear or mtn lion while hiking or fishing, but have seen bears regularly while hunting grouse and around my house in the mtns when the neighbors leave their trash out. Last week my young black lab went after a bear that came up our drive and treed it, she is small but mighty. haha

Twice in in the last 20 years I experienced a primordial sense of fear that something was stalking me. In both instances on different trails I was descending through a narrow canyon with heavy vegetation and rocks on both sides and it was dusk. Gives me chills now just recalling it. LOL Nothing came of it though.
 

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I hiked the New York Lake trail last Saturday. If you take 418 past Fulford a few miles you will come to the trailhead, it is called New York Mtn Trailhead. This will link up with the New York Lake trail which is #2221. I have been hiking up to a variety of Alpine lakes since 1996 and this was by far the most challenging, tiring and even dangerous at times trail to follow. It is lightly used, impossible to follow on most sections without using GPS with the trail marked on the map since the trail is not visible in most sections.

There is little to no water to be found along it and most of it is exposed, be aware of the weather changes since you can't really see the storms coming until they are on top of you due to the extreme angle of the canyons and valleys. You know it is going to be challenging when you break out of the treeline at the very beginning of the NYL trail and have to literally climb down using all 4 appendages into the valley and still have about 3 miles of hiking which involves at least 2 more ascents and descents to get to the lake.

With that said, the views are literally breath taking, there are sections of the trail which run along 1000' plus cliffs, bring your camera. Don't bring a child or dog along unless they are very athletic and can climb. I made it to within .3 miles of the lake and the lightning ran me out of the valley. LOL
Thank you so much for your advice. Have a nice day !
 

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Hi B, I have a very real fear of mtn lions and bears in the backcountry
Yeah the cats are what make me most nervous. Those sneaky critters can have their mouth around your neck before you even hear them coming. Tho I realize the chances of that are VERY slim.
 

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This may be a morbid thought, but if I had to get killed by a wild animal, I would choose a mtn lion, at least they try to kill ya before they eat ya! maniacal laughter....
 

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I heard something interesting about being chased by a big cat... true?... i dunno. Throwing down articles of clothing etc. while fleeing causes the cat to stop and tear up what ever has your scent on it and buys you some time. I would give him plenty of excrement to take his mind off of me lol. Personally, I am never unarmed when in the high/back country. Also, I would think the risk of attack would increase in a period of extreme drought like we have been in due to the lack of natural prey that may diminish with drought.
 

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I hike up to these lakes just about every weekend in the summer and fall, the non stop action of catching fish all day and the solitude is incomparable to any other type of fishing I have done here in CO.
I totally agree. For me this is the most addictive type of fishing. When you go up into the high country, the fishing is always good, even if the catching isn't. I too used to go about every weekend in summer, but adult life has caught up with me. Between a 4 year old, a 2 year old, and another kiddo on the way, I am lucky to get about two or three of these types of hikes in a year.
 

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I heard something interesting about being chased by a big cat... true?... i dunno. Throwing down articles of clothing etc. while fleeing causes the cat to stop and tear up what ever has your scent on it and buys you some time. I would give him plenty of excrement to take his mind off of me lol.
Haha on the excrement... Honestly if anyone can remember and have the dexterity to throw out clothing while running from a cat, I seriously commend them!

Personally, I am never unarmed when in the high/back country
Whatcha carrying if you don't mind?

I always have my clunky Taurus 357 strapped to my side, but I'm really hoping I can convince santa I need one of these (13.8oz empty): https://www.smith-wesson.com/firearms/mp-340

risk of attack would increase in a period of extreme drought like we have been in due to the lack of natural prey that may diminish with drought
I was thinking about this before too. I talked to some folks who run a campground up on monarch pass a few weeks ago and they said no sightings of bear/cats this year because of low snowpack... Makes me think higher snowpack yrs drive them down because the snow depths make it difficult to survive up high. I honestly don't know tho.
 

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wow, 3 kids, my wife delivered my daughter (now 14) when I was 40 and she was 39, we gave up after that :), I can see why you are busy!!!

I have a Ruger Blackhawk 44 magnum handy when I camp w the family, we primitive camp and the 2 legged varmints scare me more than 4 legged haha
 
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