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Hello,
My wife and I are not fisherman. The last time that I fished must have been about 30 years ago.
However, we just vacationed in Estes Park and one of the things that we did was take a 4 hour guided trout fly fishing expedition. We waded in the Big Thompson river and caught a fish.
This seems like something that we may both enjoy doing every once in a while.
So, that leads me to a few questions:
*) We live in colorado springs. We like the idea of fly fishing because you are always doing something. When I was younger, I fished in the midwest and we just threw a bobber line in the water or weighted line (for catfish) and then just sat around. This is too boring, so the idea of fly fishing intrigues us. How far would we have to drive to, to be able to fly fish in moving water?
*) If we buy equipment, what is good beginner setup that is not too expensive. I was looking at the Orvix Clearwater (but it seems fairly expensive) or the Redington Path outfit. Would those be good choices?
Is there anything else that you would recommend that wouldn't break the bank?
*) would it be better to buy a pre-setup outfit or buy a rod and reel seperately?
*) is a 9'-5 weight outfit what would be best?
*) my wife is 5'4. She used a 9' rod when we went out in estes park. Is this the recommend size for her or would she be better off with a little shorter rod (like 8'6 or so)?
*) in estes park we fished with a wet fly and a tiny bobber (or "fish indicator"). we could see this while we fished. Our guide had me switch to a dry fly and it seemed to be troublesome because after 7 or 8 casts, the fly would start sinking and it was hard to see the fly in the water.
*) Other than its ability to fit in smaller places, is there a difference between 4 piece and 2 piece rods?
*) I found a place called Angler's Covey in the springs that offers several types of classes. Would you recommend them or anywhere else?
*) What do we look for in the purchase of waders and boots?
*) other than flies, rod, reel, waders, boots, what else is needed?

thank you,
tim schaubroeck
 

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you only need to drive about 40 miles to get to the tail waters of lake pueblo for good fishing year round. a lot of smaller fish as well as some over 5 lbs and a few near 10 lbs. I don't fly fish but the lake can be a great place to fly fish from a float tube for bass and walleye. the best thing about pueblo is fishing in the winter in shirt sleeves in dec & jan. trout are the main fish in the river but you might catch a nice small mouth bass or a walleye
 

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Hello,
...
So, that leads me to a few questions:
*) We live in colorado springs...How far would we have to drive to, to be able to fly fish in moving water?
In addition to going south to Pueblo, you have the option from the Springs of going west, up US24 to Woodland Park and then down to Deckers to fish the South Platte in the big canyon, or farther west to Lake George to fish the South Platte in Elevenmile Canyon, or to the lakes and smaller branches of the Platte in South Park. The water is bigger than here in Estes Park, for the most part, and the fish are highly educated -- this means, however, more interesting fishing.
*) If we buy equipment, what is good beginner setup that is not too expensive. I was looking at the Orvix Clearwater (but it seems fairly expensive) or the Redington Path outfit. Would those be good choices?
Is there anything else that you would recommend that wouldn't break the bank?
*) would it be better to buy a pre-setup outfit or buy a rod and reel seperately?
A pre-configured rod/reel/line combination is a good start, and the two you mention here are fine (anything less expensive is likely not to be, though).
*) is a 9'-5 weight outfit what would be best?
Personally, I prefer light tackle and would pick a 8.5' or 9' four-weight to start with.
*) my wife is 5'4. She used a 9' rod when we went out in estes park. Is this the recommend size for her or would she be better off with a little shorter rod (like 8'6 or so)?
She'll be fine with either.
*) in estes park we fished with a wet fly and a tiny bobber (or "fish indicator"). we could see this while we fished. Our guide had me switch to a dry fly and it seemed to be troublesome because after 7 or 8 casts, the fly would start sinking and it was hard to see the fly in the water.
There are dry-fly floatants (goop you put on 'em) that will make the fly float longer. Generally, you'll catch more fish with underwater flies, although it's harder to know when the fly has been taken. Floating flies are more exciting to fish because you can see the take.
*) Other than its ability to fit in smaller places, is there a difference between 4 piece and 2 piece rods?
Not for these beginner setups. A four-piece is easier to take hiking.
*) I found a place called Angler's Covey in the springs that offers several types of classes. Would you recommend them or anywhere else?
I'd recommend a class for casting that includes other stuff (like knots and various tackle tips); I don't know about that shop, but it's probably fine for beginners.
*) What do we look for in the purchase of waders and boots?
Stocking-foot waders with separate boots will provide better footing (because you get boots that actually fit). I like boots with felt soles for traction; studs in the soles help with traction but damage floors and wo on if you forget. Breathable material (like Gore-Tex) will be less sweaty.
*) other than flies, rod, reel, waders, boots, what else is needed?
Ha! That's like asking a professional photographer what equipment is needed. Check out the gear at that fly shop, or online at Orvis or Cabelas, and you'll see what I mean -- fly-fishing can be hugely gadget-intensive. One thing to think about is what to carry the flies and all the other gadgets you'll end up with in, a vest or a chest pack, or what.

Mostly, have fun, and don't stress about any of this. HPH
 

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Orvis outfits are good quality and matched, can’t go wrong .

Stick with the 9ft 5 weight , it is a good all around set up.

Consider the Encounter outfit if the Clearwater is too salty for your budget.

Shorty rods aren’t for shorter folks but for brushy streams.

Classes would be an excellent way to get a head start on the skills needed.

4 piece rods store better.


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