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OUTDOOR AGENCIES RESUME MUSSEL MISSION


DENVER - As the weather warms and boat owners ready for spring, the Colorado Division of Wildlife and Colorado State Parks are launching the annual effort to protect the state's lakes, reservoirs and rivers from aquatic invaders. The focus of this year's efforts will be zebra and quagga mussels, but boat inspectors will also check for New Zealand mud snails, rusty crayfish and other invasive species.

"This will be the fourth year of Colorado's active boat inspection program and we continue to make the process more efficient, more effective and more convenient," said Elizabeth Brown, who leads the Division of Wildlife's statewide invasive species efforts. "Boaters stepped up to help improve this process and educate each other and we truly appreciate their partnership with us."

Since 2007, officials have stressed the "clean, drain and dry" message to educate boaters on how to make sure their crafts aren't moving anything from one water to another.

"Boats that are clean and dry will get through these inspections more quickly," Brown said. "Dirty, wet boats are going to get a longer look and may need decontamination before being able to proceed."

Specially trained State Parks' staff will inspect boats entering the water at 29 State Parks. Seven State Parks that are open or will open this week for the 2011 boating season are: Barr Lake, Boyd Lake, Chatfield, Cherry Creek, Highline Lake, Jackson Lake, John Martin and Lake Pueblo.

"Inspections at other State Parks will start as the warm weather thaws the ice and the water is available for boating," said Gene Seagle, invasive species coordinator for Colorado State Parks. "We have a great boating resource and appreciate the growing understanding of the need for these inspection programs within the boating community."

Division of Wildlife teams have begun boat inspections at Jumbo and Prewitt Reservoirs in northeastern Colorado's Logan County. The reservoirs opened for boating Friday, March 11. Douglas Reservoir will open to boating April 1.

Other Division of Wildlife inspection operations will be carried out at waters around the state as boating access becomes available in April and May. The Division of Wildlife offers boat inspections on dozens of lakes and reservoirs.

In just the past two years boat inspectors have intercepted more than 30 boats with mussels attached coming into Colorado. Those boats have been stopped from entering Colorado waters, preventing the spread of these invasive species. Because of the success of these interventions, no new zebra or quagga mussel positive waters have been discovered in the state since 2008.

Boaters who live or are traveling through Denver, Grand Junction or Hot Sulphur Springs also have access to the Division of Wildlife's permanent boat inspection facilities. Boats inspected at these facilities can be affixed with a seal that will allow the boater to get through reservoir inspections much more quickly.

"A lot of boaters find that it is more convenient to run the boat over to the Division of Wildlife office and get the inspection done a few days before they head out," Brown said. "That way, when the day of the fishing trip comes around, they can get through the inspection and onto the water much faster."

Inspection stations at the Division's Denver headquarters at 6060 Broadway in Denver, Northwest regional office at 711 Independent in Grand Junction and Hot Sulphur Springs area office at 346 Grand County Road 362 are available weekdays during regular business hours.

Colorado State Parks has a series of short videos about the topic available on their website at:
http://parks.state.co.us/Boating/Pages/BoatingProgramHomeaspx

To also help boaters learn more about invasive mussels and to help boaters understand the inspection process, the Division of Wildlife has posted several videos on its website. The videos are available at:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/Videos/Mussel.htm
http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/Videos/watercraftinspection.htm

Below are hours for some recently opened State Parks inspection operations. For additional details, see the State Parks website at http://parks.state.co.us/Boating/NewBoatInspection/Pages/BoatInspection.aspx

Barr Lake State Park: inspection hours will be 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. weekends only in March with expanded hours beginning April 1 (see website for additional information)
Boyd Lake State Park, main boat ramp, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mon.-Thur., 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. Fri., Sat., and Sun. through May 1, when hours will expand from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily
Chatfield State Park: north boat ramp open 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. South ramp opens April 1 and hours at both ramps extend May 1 to 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.
Cherry Creek State Park, East Ramp, 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily
Highline Lake State Park, main boat ramp, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily
Jackson Lake State Park will open for boating Friday, March 18, inspections 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon. through Fri. and 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sat. and Sun. On May 1, the hours will be 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. daily.
John Martin State Park will open Wed., March 16, inspections 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mon. through Fri. and 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends.
Lake Pueblo State Park, main ramp, 5 a.m. - 11 p.m. daily (see website for additional information)


Below are hours for some recently opened Division of Wildlife State Wildlife Area waters. For additional inspection sites and hours, see: http://wildlife.state.co.us/Fishing/MandatoryBoatInspections.htm.

Prewitt Reservoir, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Fri., Sat., Sun. and Mon. Beginning April 1, inspections will be seven days a week from 6 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Jumbo Reservoir, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Fri., Sat., Sun. and Mon. Beginning April 1, inspections will be seven days a week from 6 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Douglas Reservoir will open to boating April 1.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.
 

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In just the past two years boat inspectors have intercepted more than 30 boats with mussels attached coming into Colorado. Those boats have been stopped from entering Colorado waters, preventing the spread of these invasive species. Because of the success of these interventions, no new zebra or quagga mussel positive waters have been discovered in the state since 2008.
Translation---

The only real risk of infecting waters is from boats coming in from out of state and, perhaps, those leaving waters that currently show evidence of mussel infestation, e.g., Pueblo Res.

The inspections ought to be limited to boats coming from out of state and those leaving waters that have tested positive for the mussels. The remainder of the $2.5 million we're spending annually on this is money we're just pissing away.
 

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[
Translation---

The only real risk of infecting waters is from boats coming in from out of state and, perhaps, those leaving waters that currently show evidence of mussel infestation, e.g., Pueblo Res.

The inspections ought to be limited to boats coming from out of state and those leaving waters that have tested positive for the mussels. The remainder of the $2.5 million we're spending annually on this is money we're just pissing away.


[/quote]

that sounds good but it won't work. how do you figure you could make it work? how could you stop out of state boats and inspect them? how could inspect all colo boats that have been out of state and have been in infected water? you still have 6 lakes that have tested positive.
 

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walleye seeker said:
that sounds good but it won't work. how do you figure you could make it work? how could you stop out of state boats and inspect them? how could inspect all colo boats that have been out of state and have been in infected water? you still have 6 lakes that have tested positive.
First of all, you set up inspection points at points of entry. That takes care of boats coming from out of state.

Second you inspect boats leaving any waters that currently test positive. That may only be Pueblo at the moment. I know it's no more than half a dozen, and Granby, Grand Lake, and Shadow Mtn will come off the potentially "positive" list with one more year of negative tests.

It's not that hard.
 

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walleye seeker said:
there are over 40 points of entry that would have to be open 24-7-365 that has already been thought of
There are about 3 months every year (Dec - Feb) when you wouldn't have to staff them, because the lakes are frozen and the weather is such thatb the mussels attached to a boat couldn't survive anyway.

You don't think that's cheaper than staffing all the boat ramps? It has to be.
 

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ramps are operated by inspectors that are part time employees at the rate of $7.70 per hour. entry points would have to have 2 enforcement people at the rate of about 3 times that plus they would have to have a patrol car available. this has been thought out before. also the 2.5 mil is partly paid by fed grants
 

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walleye seeker said:
entry points would have to have 2 enforcement people at the rate of about 3 times that plus they would have to have a patrol car available.
Why 2 people? And why at a higher pay rate? They could still be part time. There are patrol cars there any way. Why does there need to be another one? It seems to me that in today's climate of agency consolidation and cost cutting that this is a way to cut costs, make government smaller, and increase personal freedom.

I don't see any huge impediments.

This might just be the governor who would look seriously at something like this.
 

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gofindyourowndamnfish said:
walleye seeker said:
entry points would have to have 2 enforcement people at the rate of about 3 times that plus they would have to have a patrol car available.
Why 2 people? And why at a higher pay rate? They could still be part time. There are patrol cars there any way. Why does there need to be another one? It seems to me that in today's climate of agency consolidation and cost cutting that this is a way to cut costs, make government smaller, and increase personal freedom.

I don't see any huge impediments.

This might just be the governor who would look seriously at something like this.
cut costs, smaller government, increase personal freedom!! Are you a closet conservative?
 

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you are talking of weigh stations not port of entry. weigh stations are not all open 24-7 and only operate on the major highways. to be effective a point of entry would have to be on all county roads that cross state lines. also enforcement personal cant be part time. it apears that you dont hunt, i have crossed state lines 10 times in one day and never got off dirt roads and that is just kansas where all the lakes are infested.you can come into colo on I-25 from NM and bypass the weigh station if you are going to trinidad
 

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walleye seeker said:
you are talking of weigh stations not port of entry. weigh stations are not all open 24-7 and only operate on the major highways. to be effective a point of entry would have to be on all county roads that cross state lines. also enforcement personal cant be part time. it apears that you dont hunt, i have crossed state lines 10 times in one day and never got off dirt roads and that is just kansas where all the lakes are infested.you can come into colo on I-25 from NM and bypass the weigh station if you are going to trinidad
Come on, Byron-- Get reasonable. What is the likelihood that someone coming into this state on I-70 is going to get off the highway and wander around on dirt roads to avoid a 10 or 15 minute mussel inspection? Not gonna happen.
 

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bassboy said:
cut costs, smaller government, increase personal freedom!! Are you a closet conservative?
Ask him about how he thinks people busted with marijuana ought to be dispositioned. Dude's a right wing nut.
 

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ya see Don it only takes one boat, maybe we should stop them at the borders also

another thing they are inspecting for is aquatic weeds that are found in several colo lakes, such as trinidad, lathrop state park lakes and brush hollow is suspected to have them also.

there are 7-8 invasive species that they are inspecting for
 

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Millions being pissed away, Byron. Inspect incoming boats at the borders and those leaving infected waters. Cheaper and less hassle for anglers.
 

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We might just need to get used to it, It would be nice while they are out there if they also did creel census or other things to help even though they are just low paid temporary help.
 

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gofindyourowndamnfish said:
The only real risk of infecting waters is from boats coming in from out of state and, perhaps, those leaving waters that currently show evidence of mussel infestation, e.g., Pueblo Res.

The inspections ought to be limited to boats coming from out of state and those leaving waters that have tested positive for the mussels. The remainder of the $2.5 million we're spending annually on this is money we're just pissing away.
::) Oh brother! :D

Oh, Mr. cynical is back too!!
 

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gofindyourowndamnfish said:
walleye seeker said:
you are talking of weigh stations not port of entry. weigh stations are not all open 24-7 and only operate on the major highways. to be effective a point of entry would have to be on all county roads that cross state lines. also enforcement personal cant be part time. it apears that you dont hunt, i have crossed state lines 10 times in one day and never got off dirt roads and that is just kansas where all the lakes are infested.you can come into colo on I-25 from NM and bypass the weigh station if you are going to trinidad
Come on, Byron-- Get reasonable. What is the likelihood that someone coming into this state on I-70 is going to get off the highway and wander around on dirt roads to avoid a 10 or 15 minute mussel inspection? Not gonna happen.
Some people will always look to avoid checkpoints, for a number of different reasons. Mainly because they are doing or carrying something illegal...bucket biologist....drunk drivers.
 
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